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Hello @janos and welcome to Seasoned Advice! The first thing that comes to mind would be to first wrap your food items tightly in plastic wrap and then vacuum seal them. However, if you open and close them frequently that could be a pain. But, if you on are only keeping the items 2 - 3 days, it could work. That said, plastic can absorb odors and allow them ...


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I had to look this up. It turns out that Swiss cheese is an American term for what Europeans call Emmentaler cheese. This cheese is characterized by the large holes created late in the fermentation process. As Wikipedia mentions, the byproducts of its special fermentation, acetate and propionic acid, give it its typical taste. This means that you can't ...


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Cheese sits out for years. I may think that the processed cheese may go bad, but never over night. It is crazy to even think that. You could probably leave it out for a day or two and it still would be good. I have left it out for that long many times and never got sick. Cheese was left out for years hanging from the ceiling before refrigerators were even ...


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You can prevent prevent cheese from separating as it heats by adding sodium citrate to the recipe. Sodium citrate is the same ingredient used as the binder in processed cheese and wine-based cheese recipes. I bought a bag from Amazon that will last me a lifetime: ...


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I don't know whether it's meant to be melted but it's not how raclette cheese in France or Switzerland is usually like. Livradois is not a region I would spontaneously associate with raclette either. Having grown up in the Alps, I would personally consider raw milk raclette cheese from Savoie or Valais as the most authentic and those cheeses definitely hold ...


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Turns out it's not mislabeled: it's actually Raclette Livradois. Embarrassingly enough, I just noticed that there's a fragment of the whole-wheel label wrapped up with it, with a "vradoi" that let me find it, and it's consistent with this picture. (Sorry, didn't mean to cheat with extra knowledge to answer my question!) Different pages describe it as ...


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I think it is mislabeled, at least as far as making raclette "the usual way" is concerned. I feel sure it could still be used as such, maybe spoon it into the tray and heat it up very quickly. Though probably much more difficult to get a nice "gratin" unless you can turn the heat up really high, or perhaps use an oven instead, on broil. What you got sounds ...


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It appears that a "cheese royale" is a fancy name for a custard made with combinations of soft cheeses, cream, eggs and seasoning. From this recipe: Whisk together the cream and eggs and season with salt and pepper. Fill the potatoes with the custard mix and sprinkle chives on top. As for using other cheeses, I really don't see why not, or why it ...


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Apparently the mould is fine (ie. relatively normal) for (unpasteurized) Brie cheeses of that nature. However, should the mould develop fur (white hairs) then discard the cheese. Or at least chop away the mouldy parts and a generous excess bordering the mould also.


3

No, there's no risk. Cheese has too much salt and acidity to harbor botulism even at room temperature; there's practically no chance of it growing in the refrigerator even with low-acid food, and literally zero chance of it growing in the freezer on any food. I don't think data is publicly available on individual botulism cases in the U.S. or worldwide, but ...


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Do you have a model that allows you to change the temperature? If so, lower the heat. I prefer medium to medium low heat for grilled cheese. It gives time for the cheese to melt, and the slow cooking means the bread toasts through more without burning the surface touching the pan. Here is a list of temperatures. I am not sure what the lowest setting on ...


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Not all cheeses run the same fat content. Generally harder cheeses have less water, more protein, and lower fat than soft cheeses. (Compare parmesan to brie) This is influenced with the starting milk. Fatter milk = fatter cheese. Fat is what nature puts in food to make it taste good. There are low fat cheeses. There are low fat cheese flavoured ...


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Try using a different cheese that melts better; try Gouda, Gruyère, Jalsberg or similar. Most Swiss cheese melts well.


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As previously answered, yes cheese is made of milk, and milk's fat can't really be broken out into saturated and non saturated. The ratio is fixed, but you can lower the total volume of it in a cheese. (or eat less cheese for the same effect) However, vegans have been innovating the the non-milk cheese category for some time. Cashew cheese is a pretty good ...


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No, there aren't such cheeses. All cheeses are made from the same basic product - milk - and there are no changes to the fat happening in the cheesemaking process. Whatever ratio of saturated to unsaturated fats goes in, the same ratio goes out. There are cheeses made from milk of different animals, and they do have a different ratio of saturated to ...



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