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Typical standards are: Edam and Colby – up to 6 months Mild – up to 9 months Tasty – up to 18 months Vintage – up to 24 months Epicure – up to 36 months In our modern processed and bar-coded product world, cheese is auctioned/sold by the ton as either "frozen" for future ageing, or "young cheese" for ageing or processing See ...


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According to Dairy Australia, an Australian industry association (emphasis added): Cheddar Classifications Mild Cheddar - matures for one to three months. Semi-matured - matures for three to six months. Matured or tasty - matures for six to 12 months. Vintage - matures for 12 to 24 months.


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No, the article is bogus. There are many ways to coagulate proteins (although the exact method chosen will make a big difference in what the final result looks like). Heat, acid and enzymes all work for coagulation. And while you can't use heat to make milk, both acid and enzymes from various sources is OK. The enzymes suited for cheese making are called ...


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We always just used mozzarella cheese in lasagna and loved it. But it in layers and on top of the lasagna.


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I may have found the answer I was looking for from http://www.cheesemaking.com/store/pg/242-FAQ-Mozzarella.html Many folks try to knead their cheese like bread during the stretching phase. That will result in too much moisture loss which can cause your cheese may become tough and chewy. Instead, you want to use a process more like pulling taffy. Let it ...


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I think that your culture should be fine, given your storage method and sterility in handling. All you can really do is try making some cheese, and see how it turns out.


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Cheese is a durable food, and the date printed on it is more of a best-by date than an expiration date. While brie is rather soft (which is normally a problem because soft cheeses are more welcoming to bacteria), its colonisation by noble mold fills the ecological niche which would be otherwise claimed by pathogens. So, especially if you kept it in the ...


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Yes you certainly can. Brie is a robust cheese which has no problem aging a few months. I personally ignore use by dates on all cheese products. The older the better and dont worry about a small bit of mold either, just cut it off with the rind. I find use by dates a constant source of endless amusement. What do they think people did before the common body ...


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A simple way to make this is to add a teaspoon of baking soda to a few teaspoons of lemon juice, and heat in the microwave until all the reaction has ceased (about a minute). You now have sodium citrate Then add a cup of grated medium cheese and gently heat and stir until smooth You now have a form of plastic cheese


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Sodium citrate is a salt that is often used in making cheese sauces. When you dissolve it in water before melting the cheese into the same it will prevent the cheese fats and proteins from separating and thus prevents the sauce from becoming grainy. It can also be used to melt, thin, and remold cheese into new slices which have better melting characteristics ...


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See this article from Kenji Alt's Food Lab column. He makes slicable cheeses from various different types of cheese, using gelatin as a stabilizer that provides the rapid melting characteristics, and condensed milk.


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You'll likely offend people by calling it 'plastic' cheese, as the typical name for it is 'American' cheese. You should be able to find recipes for it under that name, such as this one.



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