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0

Some mold spores can withstand high temps and the toxins produced by "bad" mold don't break down into something safe because they are heated. Brie and brie-like cheeses are supposed to have white mold, but green is a different mold, and unless you know that particular green mold is safe to eat, I'd cut it off.


2

It isn't a perfect match for the flavor and texture of regular pizza cheese, but soy cheese (Daiya mozzarella shreds, specifically) reheats beautifully and is even good cold. We switched cheeses because of a dairy intolerance, but found the storage properties to be a great side benefit. It does end up being a noticeable change to a pizza's flavor profile, ...


2

I've found that lower fat cheeses tend not to reheat particularly well. Full-fat mozzarella would be better than part skim. Also, keeping the cheese in bigger chunks gives better results than shredding, so slicing may be a better way to go. I use full-fat soft mozzarella which I pull apart or slice rather than shredding, and it has a much better texture when ...


2

While there are many cheeses to choose from, I find that provolone both heats and reheats well. Also, the flavor profile works nicely with most Italian dishes, pizza included. I've used smoked, unsmoked, mild, and sharp. Whether smoked or not, the mild tends to be a little "meltier", and more suited to the flavor I'm looking for.


7

The easiest solution is to use different cheeses. Most commercial pizzerias, like Domino's or Pizza Hut do not use expensive cheeses like Parmesean or fresh mozzerella... they use crappy cheese designed to be stretchy and to stay that way when warm instead of hot. In general, they use part-skim mozzarella, which is often sold pre-shredded and in hard blocks ...


1

I recommend putting your pizzas in a place where they stay warm. An isolated box, or in your bed in a carton box. The dough will get soggy eventually, though. Domino's gets away with this because the dough is thicker so it takes a while. If you want crispy, nice, fresh pizza, I recommend eating them fresh, especially because you are making them fresh ...


0

Can you get access to a grill or similar? Switch the problem to 'how can I get my ready-assembled grilled cheese sandwiches to work?' and it's a much easier problem! I've tried making batches of sandwiches on a sunday night and popping them in a freezer for the week, and it worked OK. I didn't try pickles; I imagine the water content in them, or in ...


-1

Queso DE papa in English it would be potato cheese


1

Also try sieving or blending the cottage cheese first, if you don't like the texture but don't mind its subtle flavour. It changes the texture totally, and my husband will happily eat it in pasta dishes, even though he doesn't like the texture usually.


0

Room temperature is out if you use any spreads like mayo, you'd need to refrigerate them or freeze them, neither of which is good for the consistency of the bread. In either case your bread will be soggy and/or stale. I'd say you could get away with one day in the fridge and still have it reasonably edible, depending on the bread and other factors. Of ...


0

The freezer is your only option. If you don't like the taste after unfreezing, then there is nothing you can do and have to make your sandwiches fresh.


0

My favorite vegan mozarella is Teese Vegan Mozarella from Chicago Vegan Foods. Indeed, a vegetarian friend of mine who does eat dairy actually prefers Teese on pizza to dairy cheese. Chicago Vegan Foods recently discontinued retail sale of Teese, though it's still available to food services. You can contact them to find an up-to-date list of distributors. ...


1

The "Mozzarisella" is based on rice and goes relatively close to the original one, unluckily it may not be so easy to find it. Personally I've never encountered it outside Italy.



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