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3

Your sauce is thickening up too much because it's losing moisture. After you cook your cheese sauce to perfection and mix it in with your pasta 2 things are happening: The sauce loses moisture due to evaporation. It's hot, and even with the lid on you will still lose moisture The pasta will soak up water from the sauce. It's just starch, and starch sponges ...


4

I think your best bet might be to re-wax the cut surface with cheese wax, available from cheesemaking suppliers, and then store in the fridge, unless you have a cheese cave handy. In general a vertical halving will reduce storage loss by minimizing the cut surface - you could have had the same cheese availability by vertically halving the wheel (with a ...


1

Freezing the cheese is OK. Grana Padano is a hard cheese (it does not slice easily and does not spread); and will mostly be used shredded or grated; so texture loss due to freezing will not be an issue. As in all frozen things, freeze as fast as possible (make small portions, if possible to speed up the freezing process) and thaw as slowly as possible (in ...


0

I would tend to tear mozzarella for pizza or as a topping to focaccia. For other soft cheese, slicing it with a chef's knife works fine; putting the diced cheese into a bowl of water can help it stop sticking back together. For example, when making a salad with ripe brie, I slice the cheese during prep, then drain and add it just before tossing the salad. ...


0

I freeze the cheese then put in in small chunks into the magic bullet with the flat blade and in no time I have grated two pounds of cheese.


1

"Denaturing" is when something makes a protein unwind from it's normally stable, coiled state. The unzipped proteins are then able to tangle up with each other. In milk this action makes them precipitate out as the curd. http://www.thekitchn.com/the-science-behind-why-acid-curdles-milk-222962 There are a few things that make milk proteins denature: Heat, ...


0

Protein doesn't get denatured by adding citric acid during cheese making, however it makes them "clump" together, hence forming what is known generaly as lactic curd (or in this case it would be "citric" curd I guess). For example in a Crottin style cheese (lactic goat cheese), that's what makes the texture all crumbly by letting the bacteria produce a good ...


0

I substitute small curd cottage cheese for the ricotta cheese and i mash any large curds... i seriously dislike ricotta and cottage cheese and this way (whey) i don't notice it being in there. Also, I use 1/2 amount in recipe and this camouflages the ingredient as well. Hope this suggestion helps.


3

As others have noted, there is no standard. Pizza's nominally Italian it would make sense to stick to the Italian cheeses or at least start with them. And there's no point if you cannot taste the distinction between them, so why not go for cheeses that have distinct personality. Finally, while you can mix them evenly, also consider spreading them in ...


7

They all seem to use different cheeses depending on the brand. The most consistent cheese is definitely mozzarella, which makes sense as it's the default cheese on most pizzas. Second to that is some sort of hard grating cheese like Parmesan or Asiago... which also makes sense as it's a traditional pizza condiment. Other Italian cheeses also seem popular ...


0

In reply to your question - "So what's the thought process behind the development and release of this product?" Answer - to trick you into buying their fake product by implying that it is vegan and doesn't contain dairy. I have noticed more and more fake vegan products coming into the supermarkets that all have some kind of animal by-product in it. Even ...


4

It's cheaper to produce than actual cheese. In fact, some years ago, technology in Eastern Europe caught up with the world but legislation didn't - and suddenly there was a scandal when people realized that what they are being sold as "cheese" is in fact something else. Even after the change in legislation (which required labelling of non-cheese alternatives ...


0

Some people are intolerent to the fermentation process used to make the cheese (intolerent to some sort of bacteries I gess) Some other people just don't like the taste of cheese, but like the other dairy products (e.g. yoghurts, cream) In both case, these cheese alternative are fine for them, and they can use it to cook meals that normally use cheese they ...


27

Lactose intolerance (which is different from a milk allergy, which is a smaller group) comes in varying degrees, so this may be useful for people who can have a bit of lactose (who can process casein fine). For example, many lactose intolerant people (who often avoid dairy) can handle non-dairy creamer fine (and varying amounts of cheese), even though it ...



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