New answers tagged

-1

In reply to your question - "So what's the thought process behind the development and release of this product?" Answer - to trick you into buying their fake product by implying that it is vegan and doesn't contain dairy. I have noticed more and more fake vegan products coming into the supermarkets that all have some kind of animal by-product in it. Even ...


4

It's cheaper to produce than actual cheese. In fact, some years ago, technology in Eastern Europe caught up with the world but legislation didn't - and suddenly there was a scandal when people realized that what they are being sold as "cheese" is in fact something else. Even after the change in legislation (which required labelling of non-cheese alternatives ...


0

Some people are intolerent to the fermentation process used to make the cheese (intolerent to some sort of bacteries I gess) Some other people just don't like the taste of cheese, but like the other dairy products (e.g. yoghurts, cream) In both case, these cheese alternative are fine for them, and they can use it to cook meals that normally use cheese they ...


27

Lactose intolerance (which is different from a milk allergy, which is a smaller group) comes in varying degrees, so this may be useful for people who can have a bit of lactose (who can process casein fine). For example, many lactose intolerant people (who often avoid dairy) can handle non-dairy creamer fine (and varying amounts of cheese), even though it ...


3

I think it's worth the money, but buy in bulk like from Costco or Wholesale. You can get a big block for about 20 bucks and it lasts a long time in the fridge. Parmesan is rich in glutamates, the stuff that gives us the umami or meaty savoury taste. That's why we like it so much. If you want to replace it, try replacing it with another cheese that was ...


1

oh goodness, never considered parmesan that way - but maybe another sharp Italian cheddar would be more to your liking? Try pecorino romano, or a sharp matured asiago or maybe an aged provolone if you can find a sharp one? I tend to think if you got a better quality parmesan like Reggiano or Padano you may like it? it can be expensive though.


7

The 4th version you gave is optimal from a chemistry standpoint; the process of using heat to melt a soft fat and dissolve a powder into a liquid by stirring is going to be at it's most efficient when the ingredients can fully interact with each other without all that pasta in the way. It seems the main issue at hand here is the 10-15 minute wait for ...


1

I've seen a few reasons for this given. One I've seen says that the details such as acidity and temperature during creation can be a cause of unwanted texture. Another says that the moisture removal during the aging and cheddaring process can also cause the same. Being frozen in particular can cause unwanted crumbliness. The FAQ of Cabot Cheeses also ...


1

Kraft's website says they pasteurize or heat treat all their cheeses to kill bacteria and they are confident they are safe to eat. That includes their Kraft Parmesan grated cheese in the shaker container sold in the unrefrigerated aisle. Some brands I've seen don't say on the bottle "refrigerate after opening." Kraft does for legal protection, just to be ...



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