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18

To make a good baked cheesecake, I was taught the following, and it has ALWAYS worked: Start with room temperature ingredients. DO NOT over-mix. This is a significant cause of cracking, as the incorporated air tends to souffle. When baking, always bake in a bain-marie (put your cake into a water bath for insulation). Bake half an hour at 300° F / 150° C. ...


15

Alton Brown and an Elvis impersonator called it a custard pie.


14

New-York style cheesecake shouldn't have much rise to it. The mixture is basically a custard and the only rise would come from steam created in bubbles that are incorporated during the beating process. While a REALLY smooth texture is the goal, you don't want to aerate the batter as in other cakes or you'll end up with cracking on the surface from the ...


14

My grandmother's favorite method for cutting cheesecake is dental floss. Waxed or unwaxed shouldn't matter, though waxed may help keep cake from sticking too much. Just be sure not to get a flavor! Grip the ends tightly, the way you would if flossing your teeth and pull evenly down through the cake. Then release one end and pull the floss through the ...


10

In my opinion, cakes rise, pies have crusts that are filled (and do not rise). By those loose definitions, I would consider it a pie. edit: Wikipedia says it's neither. Many types of cheesecake are essentially custards, which can lead a novice baker to overcook them, expecting them to behave like true cakes.


9

Cook's Illustrated recently discovered that placing the springform pan inside a slightly larger cake pan works. The slight air gap doesn't negate the water bath's benefits. And of course a cake pan is a solid piece of aluminum, thus completely water tight. (Haven't personally tested this yet.)


7

Alton Brown says never to cook a cheesecake in a springform pan. He uses a regular pan and lines it with parchment paper so that the cheesecake won't stick to the bottom.


6

If you have 18 inch wide heavy duty foil, pull a square that is 18X18, place your pan in the center of the foil and lift the edges of the foil up around the outside of the pan, effectively making a pan within a pan (spring form inside the aluminum foil pan. If you only have 12 inch foil, pull two pieces of foil about 18 inches long and put them on top of ...


6

Still tasty gives you 2-3 months on cheesecake in the freezer. It will be safe indefinitely at freezing temp, but the texture will change somewhat. As @ElendilTheTall says, foil and plastic wrap are your best bets. Additionally, I might try freezing it for a day to get solid, and then sticking it in a vacuum sealed bag. If your seals aren't airtight on ...


5

A simple alternative would be to make a ganache flavored with Frangelico or another hazelnut liqueur. This has the advantage of having much less sugar, and probably better overall flavor, than an even-more-sweetened Nutella, assuming you start with a reasonably dark chocolate. All you do is boil cream, and pour it over a similar quantity by weight of chopped ...


5

Similarly to what was said by @mrwienerdog, temperature and cooling are the key providing your mix is robust. Whenever I bake a cheesecake I tend to do the following: start with a short period, 10 minutes say, in a hot oven 220C (425F) then take the temperature right down quickly (leaving the door ajar to aid cooling) to a slow/very slow ~130C (260-270F) ...


5

I'd make a simple raspberry coulis by blending fresh raspberries with a little water in a blender, with perhaps a touch of sugar depending on their natural sweetness, then passing the results through a sieve to remove the pips. No need to get fancy, the cheesecake is the main event!


5

I know it sounds like a stupid question, but are you sure the oven wasn't in "broil" or "clean" mode? It seems unlikely that a regular shape of flammable would emerge from a fairly homogeneous mixture. It seems more likely that a heat source in the shape of the burn marks on the top of the cheesecake was radiating directly onto it. It could have been an ...


5

Okay, I undeleted my OP to this question (to be honest, not sure how similar the two are...., never checked that closely). The most important thing to watch for in terms of the 'silkiness' would be the mixing and ingredient temp. When all ingredients are at room temp, they homogonize much quicker, and require far less mixing, therefore less air is ...


5

Perhaps you're looking for the soufflé cheesecake, which has a moderate amount of flour in it. This style is also popular in Japan. The other style popular in Japan is the "rare cheesecake", which is set with gelatin instead of being baked. I think this is probably denser than what you're referring to, so I left it out of my first edit, but worth ...


5

I hope I am not making a wrong assumption here. But German quark is a soft cheese with somewhat creamy consistency which is made from a yogurt variety (or at least a cultured milk variety) . If "yoghurt cheese" is similar to quark in the way I think it is, you are probably better off not making a substitution, but use a recipe which was made for quark (or ...


4

I always make mine in a 9 x 3" Fat Daddio's anodized cake pan. You can buy precut parchment rounds for the bottom, and you can cut a 30 x 3" strip of parchment to line the sides of the pan (I line the whole thing - makes it come out easier, and WAY cleaner - looks picture perfect when it's done). I use Crisco to "glue" the 30 x 3 strip to itself (not the ...


4

You can cook it in a regular pan. Even a non-stick pan without parchment paper is fine. Just cut it like brownies. You'll definitely need to adjust down cooking times given that your cheesecake will be a lot less thick, but be careful in doing so, especially if trying to add a brownie layer. If you start making cheesecakes regularly, however, I strongly ...


4

I wouldn't keep it more than 3 days, 5 at the most if I was desperate for some cheesecake. I agree with your statement though I have never had a no-bake cheesecake last more than a day in my family. You could freeze it and I have tried with a piece, not a whole pie before and mine turned into cheesecake soup when I thawed it and tasted terrible. I am by no ...


4

put your springform pan in a slow cooker liner or a Reynold's turkey bag. Both are made to withstand heat and work well.


4

The cheesecake kept for 1 year just fine with no discernible off flavors or other problems. I'm a homebrewer and we wound up putting the cheesecake into the freezer section of our spare 'beer fridge'. That freezer is pretty much only used for overflow freezer space, and the refrigerator section is used for beer bottles and kegs, and we have had a few ...


3

Try letting it cool in the oven. The tip is from the blog "The Little Teochew", which writes: Leave to cool in oven with door ajar, about 30mins to 1 hour. Sudden changes in temperature may cause the cake to cool too quickly and collapse. Further tips can by found in the blog post: Japanese Cheesecake


3

Cake Straight sides No fruit (except as an optional topping) Holds its shape when sliced Pie Separate crust Not frosted Doesn't rise (except temporarily while baking) No crumbs Conclusion Who cares, let's just have some cheesecake. :-)


3

You pretty much have to use the sprinform pan with cheesecakes, otherwise you can't get the cheesecake out of the pan. If you don't care to remove the cheesecake from the pan whole, then you can use anything you want—a deep cake pan would work well, for example. There are two ways to help keep the springform pan from leaking: Wrap the sprinform pan (the ...


3

Cheesecake is a custard, so your very best indicator of doneness is temperature. There are a range of opinions, from about 150 F to 165 F / 65 C to 73 C, measured at the center of the pan, in the center of the layer. If you don't have an instant read thermometer, generally, you want a thin knife to come out clean from the center; similarly, when the pan is ...


2

Sour neutralizes sweet and vice versa. So you want to make a sour sauce with almost no sugar. The obvious idea is to use a fruit based sauce. Citrus goes really well with strawberries and cherries. Lemon, lime or maybe grapefruit juice should work well as base. Mix them with water to the desired acidity and thicken them with pectin or starch. Add zests for ...


2

The 30 minute cooking time is somewhat similar to my experience with mini-cheesecakes in a muffin tin, although I would recommend checking between 20 and 25 minutes with a toothpick. In my experience mini-cheesecakes were cooked until set entirely in the middle, but if your recipe is for an NY-style cheesecake that seems to wobble a bit, things might be ...


2

My grandmother makes the best no bake cheesecake without eggs, and she routinely freezes it and then thaws it in the fridge overnight without it losing its shape. Defrosting by microwave would NOT be recommended. I can't answer the storage time though because that's what I just googled!


2

Can you make cheesecake with honey instead of sugar? Sure! Is it as simple as just replacing it 1:1? Not quite, there's increased moisture, but check the top answer here. You'll need to reduce any liquid you might be adding a bit. Without seeing your exact recipe, I can't give you an exact answer there. Whoa. Whoa. Whoa....thats not cheesecake, thats ...



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