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26

Couldn't I just use a lower temperature setting? No, you can't. Ovens are very bad at keeping a constant temperature. Not only is the oven thermostat usually off, it also cycles around its mean temperature a lot. So your food is subjected to constantly changing temperature. If you were to set your oven to 100C, you 1) won't get really 100C, and 2) won't ...


16

Don't freeze it. I tried that. The ice crystals that form at the lower temperature make the cheesecake texture awful and can cause cracks. However, people will eat warm cheesecake so just chill it in fridge for whatever amount of time you do have.


11

You are creating a bain-marie. It is used to gently heat the food and to stop the food scorching or boiling. When used for custards it stops them curdling. For cheesecakes the technique is used to stop the centre cracking.


7

I wouldn't freeze it, especially if you're planning to serve it at a party (and thus wouldn't want to risk a failed experiment). Likely, the outside of the cheesecake would freeze but the center would remain warm. If you haven't made the cheesecake yet, you could try making small individual-sized cheesecakes (in muffin tins, perhaps). If it's already been ...


5

A few cycles each in the fridge and freezer might help, if you're careful, and lucky. You should probably still have a back-up plan, if it doesn't work. and be prepared to keep the cheesecake for yourself if it doesn't end up quite right. You will want to avoid freezing the cheesecake - as Ammnar Naseer said, that can affect the texture negatively because ...


4

While I've never experienced this cheesecake personally and the photo doesn't show anything at all "Jamaican" about it, I'd hazard a guess that the recipe involves rum. The traditional go-to cake in Jamaica is a black fruit cake. It involves soaking dried fruit in rum for an extended period of time and making liberal use of molasses for color. If I were ...


4

My recommended solutions, in order of preference: Simply don't use a springform pan at all with a water bath. It's just not worth the trouble. Use a regular round cake pan for your cheesecake instead. Put parchment into the cake pan for easy removal. You'll just need to become comfortable with inverting the finished cheesecake to get it out, remove the ...


3

One hint: No seams! You can do as many layers as you like, but if there is some kind of seam or overlap it is very hard to get a tight seal. If you can get your hands at some extra-wide foil, just put the pan in the middle and pull up at the sides: no seam. If you absolutely must connect sheets, try what roofers do: Lay two sheets atop each other, fold ...


3

I just baked a cheesecake suspended above a water bath. It seriously cracked. I am trying the immersion method next time and hope for better results.


2

I've experimented a bit with liquid flavorings in tart crust (not specifically replacing butter -- I still had butter in there) and I find that it does tend to make the crust soggy, but if you are baking the crust first, you can cook it longer to counteract this and it comes out a little more like shortbread. I don't think I would recommend it, and I ...


2

I see three issues with omitting butter; Butter is a fat - a cooking medium that aids in heat transfer. It also acts as a browning agent (makes crusts 'crusty'), and it also contains lecithin, which is a binding agent. This helps hold the crust together. I have omitted butter/fat exactly once... to disastrous effect+. As for adding a flavorful liquid to ...


2

Your ratio of butter to cookie is probably the main problem here: using too much butter and refrigerating it overnight will give your crust the texture of... well... refrigerated butter. So, change the recipe and use one of the following options: Lightly soak the cookies in coffee/tea/lemonade/Cognac/whatever liquid is to your taste. Use less volume of ...


2

Short answer use convection. Use a small fan beside the cheesecake in the refrigerator blowing horizontally over it(covered of course). This will result in the cool air pulling the heat away from the cheesecake. It should decrease the cooling time by roughly 30-40% or by about 4 hours on a 12-hour chill time.


2

I use a therometer. King Arthur flour suggests measuring 1 inch away from the edge of the cheesecake and looking for a temperature between 165F and 170F. Americas Test Kitchen/Cooks Illustrated has recommended 165F in the center (checked in 20 minute intervals, provided that you're not close to 165F). However, I remember on the television show that they ...


2

In order to make the texture not " rubbery and jello-y" let your gelatin mixture cool down and set up a little bit. By adding it while boiling hot you are melting the cream cheese, effectively making cream cheese jello. Make sure to whip well after the addition, not just to blend, but to incorporate some air and increase volume. As far as flavor goes, I ...


2

Flour or starch binds moisture in the cheesecake. If you use it or not depends on your recipe, the total amount of liquid and the other binding ingredients like eggs. Using flour can leave an aftertaste, especially if not fully cooked. I recommend using the more neutral starch (corn starch, potato starch) instead. As a rule of thumb, adding starch or ...


1

It sounds to me that you are simply pressing too hard and compressing the crust too much. Use the bottom of a glass or measuring cup to press just hard enough to keep the crust in place. Very little pressure is necessary.


1

If properly wrap with plastic wrapper, and store below 30 degree F, it can last a month. But if without wrapper, it will start to crack and appear unfresh. Try not to store with meat in the freezer as cheese can absorb any ordour in the freezer.


1

I bake lots of cheesecakes and have never used the water bath. I always place a shallow dish of hot water under my cake. The trick to baking a cheesecake is to use a low temperature and longer baking time. Cool very slowly to avoid cracking.



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