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2

The application of a basic solution (baking soda or lye), has been used for ages on bread products such as bagels and pretzels to promote browning. I have found a couple of factors to be significant in the browning of proteins. Ingredient Temperature Is the meat near room temp when you drop it in the pan? Removal of moisture Pre-salt your meat while ...


2

If you want to speed up the cooking time and need to add more water, heat it on stovetop or in microwave till steaming, then add. Cook at lower heat just at or below simmer to keep beans more intact and with a cover on to avoid water loss in the first place. NEVER add salt at the beginning of the cooking process, only once desired doneness has been reached. ...


7

You want to use baking soda. Baking powder is used as a leavening agent and does this by combining an acid and a base, so it would not make your chicken more alkaline. Baking soda, on the other hand is just sodium bicarbonate and will make your chicken more alkaline. However, baking soda, especially if used in excessive amounts, will give your chicken a bad ...


1

In a way, fat and acid are. If you already consider salt,sugar,glutamates - anything that influences TASTE directly but not flavour/aroma and is not bitter (given recent research, we can taste more than one kind of bitter, which fits in there interestingly...) Glutamic acid in other forms than its sodium salt (to be found in a lot of ingredients). In ...


12

Leavening is rising by any means, so baking soda and baking powder (chemical leaveners) both apply here, as does yeast (fermentation). Chemical leaveners like baking soda and powder work by mixing an acid (varies, depending on the recipe) and base (usually baking soda in some form) to produce carbon dioxide gas. Fermentation is the process of yeast ...


2

While I personally appreciate your scientific approach to this, I think this concept is fraught with peril. :) For the acute application of a double-boiler to fudge: don't. Fudge is sugarwork/candy! Managing the heat and temperature over direct heat is part of the fun and peril of sugarwork in general! logophobe's "why" is on-point. You want to boil-off a ...


-1

Gelatinization means the starch grains swelling, releasing the starch molecules, which then cross link to thicken the liquid. The gel forms, trapping water between chains of starch. It is a heating process. Gelation is a cooling process as the gel sets.


7

I don't think there's a chemical process here. It just takes a really long time for it to freeze solid. After 5-6 hours it was probably firmer around the outside than in the middle, and after a day it was probably fully frozen. (I've made a lot of ice cream, and have reliably seen this.) It takes so long because the heat transfer is so inefficient. It's ...



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