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24

First, use self-rising flour or use 1 teaspoon of baking powder added to each cup of all-purpose flour that you're using for the dredging and coating mixture. The carbon dioxide produced during frying will cause the coating to expand and become more flaky. If you want more tender and flavorful chicken, first brine the pieces in buttermilk that has been ...


19

I've never been one to keep track of cooking times with meats, since it will vary wildly with meat thickness, burner strength and type, phase of the moon, etc. Edit: I forgot to answer "how to go about searing". I sear chicken like I sear beef: hard and fast. The point is to get that Maillard reaction going to add some deliciousness and texture (not to ...


19

Short answer - you are right on all counts and she's wrong. Tell her that, she'll love it. ;) The longer answer is that boiling a frozen piece of meat, especially one that is thick in the middle like chicken breast is exactly the opposite of what you want to do as you'll cook the outside but the inside will still be frozen, and boiling (as you rightly ...


17

Clingwrap works fine for me -- but I don't use a meat tenderizer -- I just use a small but fairly heavy pan (but not my cast iron, as it's not smooth on the bottom). When I was in college, I tried a few things. I can get pretty decent results just hitting it with my cutting board. (with it between saran wrap). Part of it might be technique -- if I'm ...


14

I always stick the chicken in a zip lock bag and pound it that way. And I use a flat meat tenderizer which doesn't rip the bag.


12

I found that putting chicken breasts in a ziplock bag and letting them sit in a bowl of water thaws them fairly quickly "changing the water helps too". Albet not as quickly as a microwave though however in my opinion too long on dethaw in a microwave seems to make the chicken taste off.


11

Simple - you're just overcooking it. A very common fate for chicken breast.


10

There isn't one. The only reliable way to determine doneness of a chicken breast is to use a thermometer. If you didn't have a thermometer then you would have to cut open the breast to confirm. Outside of those the only other method is experience. e.g. knowing that it takes 5 minutes per side to cook a breast of X size, in Y pan, on Z stove, at M heat. ...


9

The most common reason for leakage with Cordon Bleu Chicken is that the packets are too thick, which makes it impossible to get a perfect fold; you need to pound the breasts very thin - less than 1/2", maybe a little more than 1/4". The other "trick" is to make a small cut along the folded edge of the breast after you fold and seal the packets, which ...


8

The only way to be completely sure is to contact Foster Farms and ask them what their packaging is made of and whether or not it is a totally airtight seal. Everything else is speculation. There are, however, two data points on which to speculate, both from their preparation page, and this is more broadly applicable to any company that distributes food ...


8

I suspect the blackness comes from the spices you put on the chicken burning. Try this technique I learnt from Jamie Oliver: Season your chicken as normal. Put the pan on a high heat until it's hot (not stupid-hot, just hot). Add olive oil and the chicken skin-side down. Cook for about 5 minutes. Meanwhile, take a square of baking parchment or greaseproof ...


7

While yes it can be done, I wouldn't choose to do it over another technique unless that was my only option or I just needed some chicken cooked quickly for a recipe where it is used in the cooked form and will have a lot of other flavors added (chicken salad). Remember that a lot of flavor is due to browning and cooking in the microwave eliminates those ...


7

The way to get crispy chicken is double breading the chicken and immersion frying. Basically, you need a tub with your flour and seasonings in it, a basin for water and someplace to place the breaded product. You should also invest in a shaker basket of some sort (you can use a strainer or whatever you have that you can put chicken in and clean afterwards ...


7

It really depends on the texture you are looking for in your finished product. If you want a chunky chicken salad then bake your chicken breasts seasoned or not, I season mine, and then cube them. If you want something a little more exciting pan grill the breasts to the point of a little char and then dice. If you want your chicken to be flavorless and get ...


7

I think what your experiencing is the difference between our factory farmed chickens and "normal" chickens. If you do a side-by-side comparison of something like a purdue chicken and an organic free range chicken it'll taste nothing alike. Chicken, eggs, and to a certain extent beef taste immensely different (better IMO) when they're not factory farmed. Now ...


6

My brother's trick as a chef is to poach the chicken breast first until just cooked (i.e. as soon as you think the breast meat is cooked through and absolutely no more). He'll leave the breast for a few moments and the finish off in a hot pan or griddle. Another factor may be the quality of the breast meat you're buying. It's a bit more expensive but you ...


5

You can work on learning the finger test, but during your first experiments, I would cross-check this with your thermometer to make sure you know what it feels like. Personally I prefer to only trust a thermometer, as then I can be absolutely sure (within the margin of error for the device) that my food contains no living harmful bacteria to hurt anyone I ...


5

I tend to pan-sear chicken in butter on medium-high to high heat until browned, then finish it in the oven at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for about 20-24 minutes. Results in much more tender, juicy chicken than fully pan cooking it.


5

If you're cooking skinless, boneless chicken breasts, I would recommend pounding the breasts flat. That way, you won't have to cook them as long. Reducing the time means that it's less likely that your spices will burn. Wrap the chicken in plastic wrap or wax paper, and use a rolling pin or meat mallet until they are even. (I usually go for 1/2 inch thick or ...


5

The truly BEST way to cook meat evenly (frozen or not) would be a "low-temp cooking" process (AKA sous vide). If you can surround the meat with water at exactly the target temperature of the meat (e.g. 60 Celsius for chicken) you don't need to worry about it getting overcooked. Most sous vide restaurants sear both sides of the meat before and/or after the ...


4

I use a very long piece of clingwrap, place the meat about 1 quarter of the way along and fold it over. Because of air isn't trapped it doesn't rip. In then bang away with a rolling pin. Doesn't seem to get too messy (maybe I don't hit it hard enough!)


4

I use my cutting board and place a layer of plastic film ("saran wrap") over it. It can still result in somewhat of a mess, so a zip lock bag may work better albeit more expensively.


4

The exact time and temperature will depend on the size of the breasts and your oven. You should always use a meat thermometer to verify that the chicken is cooked all the way through. For breasts, you want to make sure they're around 160 F on the inside (they're actually safe to eat a bit earlier, but 160 F leaves you with a margin of error). If you don't ...


4

I prefer simmering a whole bird to get shredded chicken, like Satanicpuppy. That should take an hour or two to accomplish. For a chicken salad that has cubed pieces, I would saute or grill a whole breast, then cut it up afterwards. You can bake it, but it takes longer than the former methods. You can also slice it up beforehand and saute it- that is a ...


4

My answer to the other question still applies: vacuum packing will not prevent most foodborne pathogens from multiplying. In the case of chicken, it will stop campylobacter (which needs small amounts of oxygen) but will not stop salmonella or listeria. Here's how you can determine if thawed, previously frozen chicken is still safe to eat: When freezing, ...


4

Any kind of cooked meat or fish and most perishable foods in general are safe as long as they are fully cooked and refrigerated within 2 hours (although the quality will deteriorate rapidly with fish). If you plan to eat the leftovers twice then refrigerate two individual portions. Reheating the same item multiple times raises the risk of bacterial ...


4

The USDA NAL has this to say: Refuse: 20% Refuse Description: Bone In addition, you can compare the serving size weight of the breast with skin (145 g) to the weight of the breast with meat only (118 g), each derived from 1/2 chicken breast, so the skin accounts for about 18.6% of the deboned breast and 14.9% of the bone-in breast (accounting for ...


4

Short answer, no. If you're going to saute something in a pan it's going to have a different flavor than if you were to bake it in the oven (and you don't get the same reduction effect that you'll get by using a pan over a medium-high heat). that said, there's nothing that says you can't bake it, it just won't taste exactly the same, and will be thinner. If ...



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