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19

There's a great deal of variation in the quality of the pre-made stocks you get from different sources, so there's no clear-cut answer. Here's the types you might find: Stock cubes: these are dehydrated stock, or sometimes just chemicals meant to taste like it. It's the lowest quality option. There's a lot of variation here, I've found some brands (knorr ...


18

Chicken stock (or any stock) is made from bones; that generally means backs, necks, and carcasses - which are generally the cheapest "cuts" because they have almost no meat and aren't useful for much else. Sometimes, if you approach a butcher with high turnaround, you can get them at a steep discount, well under $0.50/kg, because they just end up throwing ...


18

Skimming is for aesthetic purposes. The scum is denatured protein, mostly comprising the same proteins that make up egg whites. It is harmless and flavorless, but visually unappealing. Eventually, the foam will break up into microscopic particles and disperse into your stock, leaving it grayish and cloudy. The more vigorously your stock bubbles, the ...


10

This is normal, expected, and desired. The long simmering of the bones will dissolve collagen in the connective tissue, creating gelatin, which will cause it to quite literally gel when cooled. This gives the stock a body and texture that is considered a virtue in using it for soup or as an ingredient in other recipes. When heated, the gelatin will melt ...


10

Your question seems to have two parts: With what do I replace chicken stock to make the dish vegetarian and How can I add some zing to the dish for added interest? To answer 1, I'd make a hearty vegetable stock from scratch. Recipies abound. Alternatively you could rely on a bought stock but I find that these can be overpowering and of course you have ...


8

Refrigerated stock is supposed to gel. Its caused by the gelatin you're (intentionally!) extracting from the bones. To determine if its a success, you'd taste it. Assuming it tastes right, then its a success. If you had you cooked it longer, you may have extracted a little more flavor & gelatin (so it'd be an even thicker gel). You can also make ...


8

Yes, it is really chicken fat rendered during the stock making process. Called schmaltz in Yiddish, it is an ingredient in its own right. For example, you can use it to fry foods, or instead of butter in creating a roux, when you would like the chickeny flavor it provides. It is a key ingredient in matzo balls, and similarly, makes spectacularly good ...


8

All excellent information, but can I answer bluntly: none of them come even CLOSE to the real thing. Once you use fresh stock, you will never, ever go back. Really. Making stock is easy, cheap, and as said above, unattended time. Stock forms the base of the kitchen, once you have it, you will notice the taste of everything you make improve so much. Get some ...


7

There are plenty of "non chicken" broths out there that are vegan/vegetarian. For example: http://www.imaginefoods.com/content/organic-no-chicken-broth Otherwise vegetable broth in general is very simple to find. I don't think you have to worry much about a vegetarian "missing" the taste of chicken or finding it lacking if you use veggie broth. I haven't ...


7

What you need for the conversion of collagen is a certain amount of energy. It is a complicated process - the melting point is around 70°C for the type of collagen contained in beef, but the melting does not happen instantly once the meat reaches 70°C. In a pressure cooking, you can apply the same amount of energy in a shorter amount of time. This is not ...


7

Edible? Absolutely yes. Flavorful? ....you should taste it and tell us. Seriously, don't serve a meal to anyone, yourself included, until you've tasted it and it tastes at least decent. (Not trying to be snarky here, that's literally the best cooking tip I was ever given) Nutritious? Probably somewhat--that chicken muscle is primarily protein after ...


6

I never worry about this. As your stock simmers, the joints, muscle and connective tissue break down and eventually they'll sink in. Sometimes adding a bit of vinegar to your stock first helps with this. Until then, just stir the stock and move the bones around occasionally.


5

To release the bone marrow, which is excellent source of protein and has medicinal properties.


5

There are two angles to this: How long before it makes stock taste bad? Smell is a good cue here, but I have made stock even with meat and bones that smell a bit "off." No bad flavor or smell was noticeable in the soup/stew. How long before it is unsafe? The long periods of high temperature involved in making stock will kill any germs. I have used old meat ...


5

If your quartering of the chicken was done quickly then you are just asking how long you can keep a chicken in the fridge. How long will uncooked chicken keep in the fridge? Your 40 hours is fine.


5

Perhaps you could consider straining it twice? Use your strainer the first time to get out the larger particles and then do a second time with the cheesecloth so that it doesn't get clogged as easily. I imagine this wouldn't be any faster, but you'd have to fight with the clogged cheesecloth less.


5

I personally would not put potato skins in my chicken stock. The flavor does not complement the other elements, and the starches you will get will cloud the stock and make it a bit grainy.


4

They go into soup. Or pot pies. Or any of the other myriad industrially produced canned or frozen foods which require chicken stock or chicken flavoring and sometimes canned chicken meat. The millions of cans of Campbell's have to come from somewhere :-) For smaller home chicken farmers, they probably end up in the stock pot. If you know people who keep ...


4

See Stock vs Broth - What's the difference in usage? Like most cooking words there is no global definition. Fat content varies by ingredients and recipe. Some fat is retained in suspension, and some will be chemically attracted to components of the stock and be difficult to remove Some people stir in the fat, most people skim it off Commercial stock ...


4

I like to use a lint free surgical towel. It works much better than cheesecloth and is not as slow as a coffee filter.


4

For ramen, udon, and soba, it is not uncommon for Japanese restaurants to use multiple broths for layered flavors. My friend is from Yamagata in Japan and several of her favorite Udon places will make a sturdy broth with dashi as well as pork and chicken stocks. When I make noodles at home, I almost always start with dashi and fortify with chicken or pork ...


4

You can use bones to make broth only once, all the goodness gets cooked out of them the first use. You could re-cook them for hours and get nothing from them.


4

Quality varies. I have yet to find a store bought equivalent to homemade, but there are adequate products. It would be worth it to purchase a few samples and find one you like. I would look for something with little to no salt, as it is better to control for that yourself, in your final product. Having said that, making stock yourself, particularly using ...


3

Chicken broth is one of the most perishable foods there is—it is nearly a perfect growth medium. The FDA recommends storing it no more than 3-4 days.


3

If you want a clear stock, cheesecloth (and a healthy dose of patience) is the way to go. I would speculate that you might get better performance by first getting the big bits out by using a colander, and then go on to the fine-mesh sieve, finishing off with another pass through the sieve lined with cheesecloth. At that point, you can also use a little ...


3

As SAJ14SAJ said, chicken broth that gels is desirable. As a matter of fact, I break big chicken bones when I make broth to release as much collagen as possible and often add chicken feet because they're rich in gel causing collagen. EDIT: America's Test Kitchen often uses "cheater" methods to skip some time-consuming steps but achieve the same, or very ...


3

Sorry for the necromancy, but I have seen a documentary on the logistics of poultry farming on Dutch television that might shed some light onto this. The Netherlands produces quite a lot of eggs and so we also have a large supply of older chickens that are not sold through the regular channels. The documentary makers actually managed to follow a batch of ...


3

Chicken broth is not vegetarian. Or if it is (soy?), you don't want to use it. The best way to make minestrone without chicken or beef broth -- and in my opinion, it's even better -- is simply long simmering. A proper minestrone should take between 50 and 90 minutes to cook. The second flavoring ingredient is a parmesan (parmigiano) cheese rind. The ...


3

Fine mesh sieve is the usual way, but the way you describe it, yours is not fine enough. Look in professional stores for a "chinois", this is the kind of sieve you need. But yes, it will take a long time. In classic restaurants, the stock will be cleared before going through the chinois. This is done by floating a rack of eggwhite which bounds the stray ...


3

A stock made from roasted chicken is never going to be clear like a consomme. You will note in the the video you reference, the stock is also moderately cloudy with some particles floating around in it. This is normal, and nothing to worry about. If you do desire a more clear stock next time: Bring the stock only to the most gentle of simmers to reduce ...



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