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The question is what do you want to acchieve. If you want to maximize flavour, you need to realize that you will only be able to taste what went in and an older bird, possibly even one that lived free-range and had a varied diet will have developed mature muscles and denser bones than what is - basically - a half-mature bird, raised in a short time on a ...


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Good information in Paulb's answer. However, you won't get the same flavor or depth of flavor from the baking hen as you will from a stewing hen. (There's a lot of difference between an 8-10 week old bird and a 52+ week old bird.) In the US, stewing hens are usually sold frozen. I haven't seen a fresh one since I was a child. (Over 40 years.) So you may ...


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From Poultry Meat Processing by Casey M. Owens and Christine Alvarado: A stewing hen is the 52 week old breeder bird. I can only guess to Roux and Peterson's suggestion, but it is probably based on size, and/or maybe that the maturity brings flavors to the stock that a young hen does not. I would avoid the Cornish hen. They are very young and small. Out ...



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