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The gelatin in stock comes from collagen. If your stock hasn't gelled then you either have too much water or not enough bones. One way to get a lot of collagen is from chicken feet. http://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/how_to_make_stock_from_chicken_feet/ Something that I have read in many stock recipes is the need to start with cold water and use gentle ...


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If you use plenty of bones, cook it long enough, and reduce it enough, you should be able to get it to gel when cooled. I believe the cooking time may be shortened a little by breaking the bones to expose the marrow (people recommend this but and although I'm not sure if it's true, it should at least allow the marrow to mix into the broth, which is a good ...


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The best way to strain stock is actually to siphon it off, that way you don't agitate the liquid as you pour the whole lot out. It's a simple process: Find a vessel to hold the strained stock and place the stockpot above it at a higher level. (I normally put a wide bowl in the sink and then the pot on the counter top; I've also used a stack of cookbooks ...


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I run mine through a colander first, then through a sieve. Then I lay a single layer of cheese cloth over the top and press down wirh a spoon so its submerged a little all the way around. Put it in the fridge overnight. Next morning remove cheese cloth, which takes most of the coagulated and chilled fat with it. Run through clean folded cheese cloth in ...


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A dish drying towel, folded double, held with elastic bands onto a juice pitcher works for a much clearer broth. Should you choose, you can dig out any bits from the residue (which I do for my dog's snack). Its quick. When the dripping slows a lot, gently slide a spoon over the surface of the towel, it pushes the "stuff" away enough to improve the flow.



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