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7

To simply facilitate the end-user cooking. You get all the "benefit" of fried food without the hassle of having to actual fry the food (hot oil handling, odors, ... ) Most people do not have fryers at home and rely on par-fried food (for example oven fries).


5

Use a higher chicken-to-marinade ratio, so a small amount of chicken isn't sitting in masses of marinade. If you see chicken tikka marinading in a restaurant, you'll note that is only lightly coated. Failing 1., simply wipe off the excess marinade before cooking.


4

Of course you can freeze meat. If it would be unsafe, your local supermarked wouldn't be allowed to sell it. What you have to keep in mind when freezing your own meat: Storage time is limited, for guidelines see here or here. Freezing does nor remove bacteria, mold and other "nasties", but stops them from multiplying. Rule of thumb: What's on the meat ...


3

Don't cook the chicken pieces for so long. Add them ten or twenty minutes before serving. For that matter, I wouldn't simmer the aromatics for that long either. Do the long simmer and cooking to make the chicken stock, then strain the now-tasteless and mushy expended bits from the flavorful stock. Heat the stock and add the sweated veggies, diced chicken, ...


2

This recipe confuses me in a number of ways. First the simplest: It calls for adding the remaining spice powders in two places, steps 5 and 7. One of my favorite food ethnicities is Indian, and in all my years of cooking and eating it there has always (with very rare exception) been one very important rule: Cook the spices. The difference in both taste and ...


2

If I understand you correctly, you're putting frozen chicken thighs in a glassware dish that's been sprayed with Pam and then putting that into a 350F oven. Since the chicken will take quite a while to thaw and begin emitting juices that will cool the dish, that dish is going to rise to 350F fairly quickly. 350F is hot enough to begin smoking with many ...


2

MgGee in his Keys To Good Cooking, recommends a couple of things that go straight to the problem you describe. First, he recommends working with lower temperatures (his bolds, his italics). Searing meat does not seal in its juices, and moist cooking methods do not make meats moist. Juiciness depends almost entirely on how hot you cook the center of ...


1

It depends upon the strength of your brine, for boneless chicken breasts I recommend a 5% brine for 30 minutes to an hour. Ideally, salt for brining should be measured by weight, especially since volumetric measurements for the same weight of salt will vary depending upon the coarseness of the salt. A 5% salt solution means you should use 20 times by weight ...


1

Don't BOIL, only ever a slow gentle simmer - Not just Chicken all Meat. If you insist on putting your Chicken in there at the start of cooking you make be better off with boneless thighs as they contain slightly more fat and sinew (good for keeping meat moist). Personally though I'd recommend buying a whole chicken. Shop's around me charge around the same ...


1

Taco Seasoning creates a wonderful taste sensation for Chicken quesadillas. I would recommend rubbing it into the chicken vs sprinkling it on. I find rubbing the seasoning in gives a much better flavour through out and reduces the chance of powdery residue or texture. Word of caution Taco Seasoning doesn't blend well with poultry seasoning. Use one or ...


1

Yes, yes you can. Recipes aren't like alchemy**. You can adjust flavorings to suit your taste. You're correct to add it when cooking the chicken ... if you just tried to add it when assembling, the flavors won't meld, the flavors won't fully develop, and it can be a bit ... chalky ... when it's obvious that there's a powder coating. ** unless of course, ...


1

The "danger zone" is 4.4° C - 60° C, so it was in the danger zone. It should not be left there for more than a total of 2 hours - and yours was 2. On top of that, freezing does not reset this countdown, it only stops it temporarily. You probably shouldn't eat this piece of meat, it isn't worth the risk.


1

Canned lychee works really well, it is sweet, slightly floral and has a distinct texture that stays relatively firm during cooking. There is a KAPOW (technical term for zowee) factor to the pineapple that really can't be duplicated. Canned mandarin slice work well too, but they don't stand up to heat very well, need to be added at the very end. The ...


1

Most probably, the peanut oil experienced over-heat* too high temperature, making the volatile compounds of oil breakdown. In that fact of the foaming is due to the formation of polymerised oil. According to Dr. Udo Erasmus, all good oils are sensitive to heat, light and oxygen.



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