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3

I would argue that if the meat 'falls apart' it would be due largely to the cooking process used, and very little due to the choice of breed. As other commentators have stated, there's probably a variety of chicken breeds used in Asian markets across the US - whether any of them use the same as Costco is anyone's guess. My guess is that a ...


3

Stuff happens to us all, especially when using highly scientific methods. If your seasonings/flavors are the way you want them and the only issue is too much liquid, just ladle out until you are left with amount of liquid you want. You can even save the seasoned liquid you take out (stored in refrigerator) and use it later when preparing another dish.


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Your highly technical method, being what it is, provides its own solution to too much water. Just let it simmer a few more minutes with no lid. That's it. The flavors will intensify as the liquids reduce. Keep it right at that point between a simmer and a boil, it won't take long at all.


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This sounds just like my cooking technique, and I have come up with a few ways to recover from overwatering. Always lowball the amount of water Like you said, you can always add water later. But if you're not watching the dish, you don't want the water to run out and burn. Corn starch Corn starch is a good way to thicken up the water into something more ...


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After our family makes fried chicken. We mix the leftover flour and egg together and pour in pan after chicken is taken out. Stir around and chop up into little bits then you have some of those little crunchy chicken in a bisquit snacks.


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If you defrosted it correctly (How to quickly and safely defrost chicken?), then yes. You can cook and serve it 2 (even 3 or 4) days later.


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I say resist the temptation to up the temperature. Some other questions here suggest no higher than 60ºC (140ºF) for sous vide chicken in order to best preserve the texture. Granted, that's for breast meat, and thighs will be more forgiving, but you've also conservatively got about 10ºF variance around your target temp. I'd say stick with the recommended ...


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I think your temperature range is good. 155 to 160 is a good place for thighs. You will need an hour to an hour and a half. As long as you don't drop into the danger zone you will be fine. You could just check a thigh with a probe thermometer at the end of an on-off session to see where the temp is. Sounds like a bit of a pain, but certainly doable. ...


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From a flavor standpoint, the preparation of the wings isn't likely to affect how well they taste after being defrosted. I think you're most likely to notice a difference in texture. Although you didn't ask about safety, it's very important that you do cook the wings fully after they're thawed, even if you've par-cooked them previously. If the meat is at ...


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Aaronut's answer is fine, I'm just coming at it from a slightly different assumption. Sandwiches like these are common in gas stations and convenience stores in the US. You can buy them in multi-packs at grocery stores or places like Costco. In multi-packs they are sold frozen, in convenience stores they have often been defrosted. They're perfectly ...


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Freezing extends the safe storage lifetime of any food. I would have to assume that a frozen sandwich may have been frozen for a long time and therefore probably isn't the best quality, but it isn't any less safe than a refrigerated, "fresh" sandwich - in fact it's probably safer, although the operative word is "probably" - that's not necessarily true unless ...



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