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7

There is almost no such thing as overcooking chicken thighs. Chicken thighs are simply the most forgiving piece of meat known to man. The only thing that concerns me about your plan is that you plan to dice the chicken. There is nothing wrong with that, but diced chicken thighs are very slightly less forgiving than whole chicken thighs. If you do dice them, ...


4

I would consider adding some soft brown sugar. The molasses content should increase the stickiness and thickness of the sauce overall. You may want to reduce the amount of white sugar to compensate.


3

Make sure that the tikkas do not touch a surface e.g. an aluminium foil or a tray. Suspend them from a grid and use a lined tray at the bottom of the oven to collect the fat/juices. Cook at 180°C for 20-25 minutes (to cook the chicken through) and then cook on maximum temperature (usually 350°C) for 5-7 minutes to get the charred/burnt effect. As a side ...


2

You can buy oven racks that allow cooking chicken pieces (or potatoes) with no tray contact points I imagine you could easily make one out of some steel wire too. Or take a spare wire oven rack, and cut ever second or third wire at the edge, and bend it up?


2

Try raising the chicken above the roasting pan, with something like a grill grate or roasting rack. Having air flow to the bottom of the chicken pieces will help crisp up the batter on that surface, and the surface area of anything that can stick to your chicken will be limited as well. You will also want to use very high heat (~450F) when cooking, so that ...


2

Let me do a breakdown of the typical ingredients of liverwurst ("Leberwurst") roughly based on food laws in Germany (aka liverwurst country): roughly 10% - 30% (sometimes up to 40%) liver: mostly pork because it's cheapest, using partly veal or poultry is more expensive but tastewise no big difference. muscle meat and bacon, again typically pork, but beef, ...


2

Try Mul yeot (Korean corn syrup) or molasses (as suggested by ElendilTheTall). Consider replacing corn starch by potato starch which gives a texture stickier than corn starch. They best way to get the exact stickiness is to try the ingredients in different quantities until you master your dish :). Good luck.


2

You could also try adding a half ounce of pectin so it doesn't throw of the sweet/sour ratio. I use it in hot sauce all the time so it isn't runny or to watery. they sell it in the canning section of most stores.


1

If you see this recipe https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F9Fzpi99tlk - When cooked in oven he is using two deck plates. Chicken is on top and underneath there is some water. I agree that Tandoor cooked in conventional oven without water plate will be very dry.


1

You say you have tried an egg wash, but you don't say in what order. This way works for me. After the buttermilk, I dredge in seasoned flour, dip in just beaten egg with no added water, and then back in the seasoned flour. To avoid sticking, line your tray with parchment, or sometimes I put the chicken on a rack placed on the tray so the heat can circulate ...


1

Did you put the roasting dish/pan on a low rack in the oven so that the bottom cook properly ? The heat from the bottom will cook the batter and prevent it from sticking. You can use parchment paper. Put the chicken on the paper instead on the roasting dish.


1

For the parampara packets, I think slow-cooking at a lower heat is better, but they are designed to be easy and quick, so I think they give the instructions that will have a meal on the plate as fast as possible, and as the packet says, you don't need to add anything at all, not even oil or salt. You could slow cook the thighs in the sauce whole, then when ...



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