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1

The organ meat inside the bony part of a chicken thigh is the kidney. A good cook removes it before preparation; I have never seen it removed by a butcher. As for the oysters, those are the two "backstrap" or "tenderloin" muscles in the small of the back. They're not organ meat -- just very tasty chicken.


1

Agree with maximegir above (point given), but just in case you're thinking, well, that's okay, when I cook the chicken any bacteria present will be killed, there's another factor to consider. Bacteria will have been present in the chicken before it was frozen, all living things have bacteria; once it's frozen, the bacteria are arrested by the freezing ...


2

If you thaw raw meat at room temperature (> 5 celcius) you may get bacterial development. With chicken, not only can you get bacteria to develop, there is also a risk of propagating salmonella onto the surface which you are thawing the meat of and it's likely to contaminate other food too. I always recommend to let the meat thaw in the fridge, where the ...


2

That depends. What does the texture of the inside pink portion look like? Does it still look like it's raw liver? Or does it look and have the texture of the rest of the cooked liver, but slightly pink? If the latter, it is probably safe to eat. The pink colour in meat is given by myoglobin. When myoglobin is heated it loses its structure and changes ...


3

They are probably safe to eat, although it's difficult to tell for sure. The basic rule is that food should spend no longer than 2 hours in the danger zone between 4 and 60 Celsius. Assuming that it took them less than 2 hours to go from "warm and unfrozen" to fridge temperature (which is below 4 Celsius), they are officially safe to eat. With small food ...


0

I wouldn't go much more than a week. When i worked in the restaurant biz that was generally the rule though we always sold out. If its going to be longer than that it needs to be frozen. If you see any darkening or discoloration its gotta go in the can. With chicken always better safe than sorry.


4

I think vacuum sealed raw chicken breasts in the fridge behave like not-vacuum-sealed chicken breast in the fridge because the meat is neither sterile nor less contaminated with bacteria than the non-vacuumed meat and there are surely bacteria that grow under anaerobic conditions. The meat will be safe for 2 days.


0

I've done it by coating chicken thighs (skin on, bone in) in a flour and spice mix (I haven't cooked this in a while, but I believe it was smoked paprika, celery seeds, salt, and pepper), and then frying in around a millimetre of oil on a very hot flame until the skin has become fairly crispy, and then transferring to a pre-heated oven to finish cooking all ...


2

A and B most definitely. My grandmother pan-fried chicken all the time, that was the only way it was ever made in my family. A few inches of vegetable oil in a deep cast iron chicken fryer: http://www.amazon.com/Lodge-L8CF3-Covered-Chicken-3-Quart/dp/B00006JSUE It is just like a regular cast iron skillet, just deeper. I have my grandmother's old one. And ...


1

I would identify the source of the smell before consuming it. That said, I would certainly not consume any product (or wear it for that matter) that had a strong chemical smell, even if I were able to identify it. If it's a recurring issue, perhaps it's the allegedly benign carbon monoxide used at some of the bigger stores to preserve meat for lengthier ...


7

B. Definitely. My grandmother used to fry them this way for decades. Just be sure to watch them closely or the bottoms will burn very quickly. A splatter shield will also come in handy if you want to keep your arms from getting pock-marked from flying grease.


17

B is your best bet. In fact, that's the original (And IMO, best) way to do it! Find a nice heavy cast iron skillet, fill it around halfway with oil, and then fry your chicken and rotate it in the pan as needed Here are some links: http://allrecipes.com/recipe/deep-south-fried-chicken/ ...


8

You could absolutely pan fry them, a combination of your A and B options. You'll need an inch or so of oil, enough to come about halfway up your chicken pieces. This is a great job for a cast iron pan, because it will soak up heat and help you get through the temperature drop that will happen when you first add the chicken to the pan.


3

Breast is lean muscle. Add a ton of heat to it and it'll seize up into a dense brick that nobody wants to eat. In that vein, I'm not sure I'd put chicken breast anywhere near a pressure cooker because that's a really great way to get something to 120°C. That's about twice what you want. Ideally we want chicken to hit 63.5°C and stay there for a bit. Here's ...


1

Frying the chicken tends to set the muscle fibers by drawing moisture out. An example of this would be taking a thin (1cm) cutlet and frying it until both sides start to turn golden. It will be pretty dry and hard. Pressure cooking it on the other hand tends to soften the muscle fibers without drawing moisture in (if anything, its putting moisture in). ...


2

I so love that you asked this question. A baking/stewing hen is the ticket to the best chicken and dumplings you will ever have. That said, finding a good stewing hen today is not as easy as it was years ago. Let me give you a little info on this. I've referred to my mother many times in my questions and answers. She was born in 1913 and would be 101 years ...


4

If you stay with the same ratio of salt (and any other ingredients) to water that you normally use, you should achieve the same results. As you normally use a 5% solution it shouldn't matter how many chickens or how much water if you stay with the 5% solution. The only thing that the weight of the chickens will factor into is the amount of brining time ...


0

You are way overcooking your meat. I know some people want to overcook chicken meat for safety reasons, but here's two ways I cook chicken breast for very juicy meat: Step 1: right when you buy your chicken breast, before putting them into your refrigerator, salt them! Salting them way before will make them much juicier later. Step 2: a while before ...


1

You mentioned frying, but one method I like for baking chicken breast is to do so at higher heat, for a shorter amount of time. 20-22 minutes at 450 degrees Fahrenheit works well in my experience (making small quantities, marinating for 15-90 minutes beforehand).


4

Something that might help is to salt the chicken and leave it in the refridgerator for a little while before cooking it. Serious Eats has a good article about brining and salting. Here's why it works: Muscles are made up of long, bundled fibers, each one housed in a tough protein sheath. As the turkey heats, the proteins that make up this sheath will ...


4

Chicken breasts by themselves are pretty hard to keep moist. Your best bet is cooking with a thermometer to avoid overcooking. However, my best chicken breasts are always when cooking a whole chicken. The trick is to rest the roast upside down, and let it rest like this for at least twenty minutes. Or even cooking it upside down if you are impatient will ...


13

The reason why your meat is dry has less to do with whether you cook in liquid and more to do with the temperature you cook the meat to. The proteins in meat will squeeze out the water in them as you increase the temperature you cook them at. If you are cooking your breasts in boiling water then that can result in meat that is cooked far above well done. ...


6

Chicken breast is very unforgiving of being overcooked, which is what is going wrong. Breast meat is very lean, cook it too long and all the moisture goes. The method you are using will not give you good, consistent results - how long it will take water to evaporate depends on too many factors, and it also doesn't control for the size of the breasts which ...


1

Cook it at slow heat for more than an hour. Cover the utensil tightly to hold the steam. Overnight marination can help in getting uniform taste and make chicken quite tender.



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