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1

You make no mention of basting. 190 is more than high enough though 3 hours sounds a bit long. Basting fat over the skin throughout cooking is the key to crispy skin. Covering it is a sure way to soggy skin.


2

Does it work? Yes, it does. The idea is to create something akin to an individual "dutch oven" around the chicken or fish you are baking. The meat is "steamed" in his own juices. There are a bunch of different "recipes" for the salt crust, often with some "binding agent" like egg whites. Usually, the skin is removed when serving (go ahead, give it a try, ...


0

The eggs cause the oil to foam and can cause an overflow. I noticed the difference when I deep fried chicken katsu and spicy hawaiian chicken. The katsu would foam up every time (eggs in the batter). The hawaiian chicken would never foam up or over flow (no eggs in the batter).


3

Not trussing is not your problem. I don't always truss a bird and often spatchcock (butterfly) them. I don't find that it makes a difference in the seasoning either way. What I suggest is to season inside and out, but with about twice as much seasoning on the inside. Then season under the skin. Let the chicken set for about 30 to 40 minutes before cooking. ...


1

Make a salty stuffing and stuff it inside the skin between the breast and skin. The salt won't get into the flesh on top because the skin protects it and sticking it inside won't do anything because salt doesn't rise, the steam does but leaves the salt in the bottom doing nothing but seasoning the very bottom which you don't eat. Stick a lemon in that whole ...


0

if you glass oven dish or bake pan, Take out one serving and heat to 30sec-45 sec . Popped into oven or toaster oven. If you put in oven you need to watch like 5-10 minutes or more.


2

I cut around the small piece of the tendon that is already protruding out a little bit, just to get a little better grip on it. Then, slide that end of the tendon through a fork and pull it straight out as the fork holds the chicken in place. You might have to use a paper towel or pliers (yes, pliers LoL) to grip it otherwise your fingers slip right off. ...


1

Last time I tried to re-heat a pie in the oven, even with foil over it, the crust burned and the insides of the pie were still only lukewarm after 10 minutes plus. It sounds like your heat might've been too high, or you put it on grill instead of regular oven elements? Anyway, what I would do is microwave it for part of the reheating time. It helps to ...


4

Foil is the way to go, combined with not too fierce a heat. You want to cook at about 160C until the centre of the pie is piping hot. To lower the chances of burning, portion the pie prior to reheating. That way the centre will get hot more quickly. Reheating more than once is generally not a good idea for safety reasons. You can however portion one ...


1

They are little blood spots, perfectly safe to eat but often a sign of cheap and/or poor welfare birds. As long as you cook it properly (take it to at least 140f) its fine to eat.


1

I recently switched from no name frozen chicken leg quarters to organic free range additive free chicken. There is definitely a HUGE difference in the fat composition. In the cheaper chicken the rendered fat always rises to the top and solidifies. In the organic chicken, the fats do rise to top but NEVER solidify. It was a very unexpected difference in the ...


4

It's a tradeoff: salting (and using herbs or spices) a chicken under the skin, rather than on the surface of the skin, will result in a better-seasoned bird but it will make the presentation of the whole bird a bit less attractive, since the skin is no longer exactly where it should be. I've also noticed that the skin gets crispier when you salt it between ...


2

You must loosen the skin of the chicken with a dull object, like a spatula, then you can add the spices as you see fit. This video shows how to do it and adds some fat to keep the (turkey) chicken breast moist.


2

You aren't getting the 'Indian restaurant' taste because you aren't using Indian restaurant techniques. Most Indian restaurant curries are based on a 'gravy' made with copious amounts of garlic, onions and ginger, stewed for several hours. They also use large amounts of ghee to add richness (and a boatload of calories), and finally they use marinaded ...


-1

Put the frozen bagged chicken in a bucket then fill it with cold water.


3

In my experience, dry wines risk being completely killed by hot food. The classical pairing would be an aromatic white, like Gew├╝rztraminer or Riesling, with substantial sweetness. Germany is the role model here, especially the wines around Sp├Ątlese and Auslese levels, with Alsace a close second. (They're also great QPR, but that's a secondary concern.) ...


1

The white wines I would pair with this sort of dish would have sweetness and acidity, plus a bit of a mineral edge, so Sauvignon Blanc, Riesling, Chenin Blanc, Viognier, or maybe an un-oaked Chardonnay. There are some red wines that would work as well but you'd want light without too many tannins, for instance a beaujolais, pinot noir, cincaut, or ...


0

I'd opt crisp rose personally to accent the fruity citrus flavors of your sauce without being completely over powered which. I feel a white would be killed by all the spice yet a red would be too dry to compliment such a dish. A Zinfandel is probably the best bet. Quite a summery, but your dish sounds that way inclined anyway :) Something like this: ...


2

It depends upon the strength of your brine, for boneless chicken breasts I recommend a 5% brine for 30 minutes to an hour. Ideally, salt for brining should be measured by weight, especially since volumetric measurements for the same weight of salt will vary depending upon the coarseness of the salt. A 5% salt solution means you should use 20 times by weight ...


0

Most probably, the peanut oil experienced over-heat* too high temperature, making the volatile compounds of oil breakdown. In that fact of the foaming is due to the formation of polymerised oil. According to Dr. Udo Erasmus, all good oils are sensitive to heat, light and oxygen.



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