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6

You want to use baking soda. Baking powder is used as a leavening agent and does this by combining an acid and a base, so it would not make your chicken more alkaline. Baking soda, on the other hand is just sodium bicarbonate and will make your chicken more alkaline. However, baking soda, especially if used in excessive amounts, will give your chicken a bad ...


6

Honey will caramelize and burn before the chicken is fully cooked. It would be better to bake or roast the chicken in the oven at an even temperature, if you've marinated it prior to. Covered in foil at first and then finished off uncovered to add a little colour. If you prefer to cook it in the pan, then adding the honey should be your last step. Turn off ...


4

Cook the chicken, and then brush with sugary things (honey, orange and soy sauce) just before cooking has finished, or after cooking Sugary coatings will burn in a pan, and leave a bad taste You can cook sugary coatings in the oven, but not at high temperatures, and the overall taste may not be too your liking


4

After a passionate, yet interesting discussion in the comments, I decided to edit my comment. Marinades: Actually, this is a broad term and sometimes is used to refer to marinades, rubs, coatings and glazes. A marinade should actually change the qualities of the piece you are preparing. A salty marinade (brine) will make the meat moister because of ...


0

I would cook a chicken tabaka. It is a whole chicken flattened on the frying pan and fried in some oil. The dish is very simple and results is something quite similar to an oven-cooked chicken. All you have to do is to cut the chicken to separate the ribcage. The bird remains in one piece.


1

As you're new to cooking, I'd actually advise you use the boneless skinless breasts that you mentioned, just because they're easier to deal with ... even if they don't have as much flavor. Although a slow cooker will work (I like canned chipotles for liquid, but I like heat), if you don't have one, or don't have the time to wait for it, here's my technique ...


5

Most recipes say to use a slow cooker, but some say boil. Why would one be better than the other? It is better to slow simmer. As a very general rule, it is better to moist cook meat or poultry slowly. It makes for a more tender, more luscious bit of meat. Sometimes I'd rather not reinvent the wheel, so I'll just show you this from Bon Appetit to ...


-2

All you have to do is Put Saran Rap on the cutting board Put meat on Saran Rap Add any seizings or whatever you need Fold over Saran Rap and begging to pound the meat with a mallet Open up Saran Rap and remove tenderized meat Throw away Saran Rap when finish Now you are done tenderizing the meat and your mallet or whatever you used to pound the meat ...


-2

Stuff with black pudding or haggis, wrap in parchment first, then tin foil, bake for 1 hour at 190c.


5

Ground chicken (or any other ground meat) has been ground with a grinder. It can be formed into patties (like hamburgers), balls (like meatballs), sausage and so on, but if cooked as-is will tend to turn into crumbles. Cubes are, well, meat cut up into cubes: chunks of whole meat, with the original texture.


1

Depending on the size, you may be able to cook the whole chicken in a crockpot. I'd estimate it would take 3-4 hours on High.


1

Considering you want to keep the chicken whole, and you won't necessarily want to buy a slow cooker or a Dutch Oven, I recommend using a relatively deep frying pan with a lid. Place the chicken in the frying pan, and fill the pan until about halfway up the chicken's sides with warm water, seasoned with spices and salt, with a few tablespoons of vinegar. The ...


6

Do you have a big pot with lid or a pressure cooker? If the chicken fits inside, just put some veggies in the bottom, the chicken, a cup of liquid, salt pepper and herbs and cook it covered during one hour at low fire (maybe 45 minutes if you are using a pressure cooker). Make sure the liquid doesn't evaporate completely or you will burn it; but if you ...


1

A recipe I tried recently (which came out delicious) is murgh mussalam which is a stuffed chicken dish from India (apparently developed in the kitchen of one of the Mughal emperors). Some versions of the recipes call for cooking in the oven but others (like the one I used) have you cook it on the stove. It's probably best used if the chicken is smaller ...


3

You can also spratchcock the chicken (remove the backbone) put in a heavy preferably cast iron, weight it down for a "Brick Chicken" plenty of recipes on the net. This also speeds up the cook time by about 1/2.


1

I've had some success playing with Jamie Oliver's poached chicken recipe. It's pretty much a one-pot dish, but clearly you can't do it in a frying pan. You will have very limited options for cooking a whole chicken in just a frying pan, especially if you mean a simple shallow-sided frying pan rather than a higher sided sauté pan. Frying Pan Sauté Pan


8

If you don't have a large pot and can't follow ESultanik's recommendation, you're going to need to joint the chicken. Once that's done, you can either shallow fry it (where the oil only comes up a little more than half way up the pieces) or braise it. If you're going to braise it, I'd actually recommend using a recipe that makes better use of the cooking ...


1

You can roast a chicken in a large toaster oven. The chicken will turn out just as good as when you use a conventional oven. Some key points - put the breast down. In a toaster oven the top of the chicken is closer to the heating rods than a traditional oven, so the breast may dry out if you expose it. Here is a video of a chicken roasted in a toaster oven. ...


12

If you are intent on cooking the bird whole (as opposed to butchering it into pieces which you can fry in a pan), then your only option would be to braise the bird in a large pot, preferably a Dutch oven. There are myriad recipes online; search for "Chicken in a Pot" or "Braised Whole Chicken". As ElendilTheTall mentioned in the comments above, the only ...


0

Stainless steel is an unusual Material for a wok; an idea or recipe calling for a wok will probably assume and work best with: a seasoned carbon steel/cast iron/wrought iron wok (which would be the right choice for high heat stir frying, or deep frying technique. Nonstick with some but not all things you might throw at it.) OR a nonstick wok (best for ...


0

Usually plastic wrapping doesn't burst from freezing, since its somewhat stretchable (unlike, say, glass). Even if it does burst, it's going to tear a seam or some weak spot—there shouldn't be an explosion. There is an easy safeguard to take though—just put a gallon freezer bag around it (squeeze out as much air as you can). Or sit it in a container to ...


5

I'm from the company you got your hens from. Water cooking is the traditional method, the size of this bird is representative of the breed, which is leghorn fowl. This is the breed used both in commercial and backyard egg layers. The stock made from the stewing hen is far more flavorful then any other chicken you will find anywhere. The meat is also rich ...


2

This sounds as if you have only cooked in non-stick pans before. They are very forgiving, and you can throw any food at any temperature into them. On a stainless steel pan, you have to cook it at the proper temperature, using the proper technique, so it does not stick. For a wok, this is a piping hot temperature, enough oil (not just wiping it), and moving ...


0

Mixing a little corn starch in with the flour helps the breading to stick


0

I use 2 very thin plastic cutting sheets with the Chicken in between them , this works great ! No mess.



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