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You did not mention whether the restaurant was committed to serving meat from free-range chickens. The living conditions can have a major effect on the meat produced. I raise my own chickens, and I discovered that there is almost no "white meat" on a very active chicken. White meat is a product of inactivity. The more the muscles are used, the more blood ...


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I eat the chicken breasts from Costco (the Kirkland ones that are individually wrapped, in a salt solution), so here's my advice for those or any similar chicken breasts: Frying: Cut the chicken breast up into multiple segments. You can cut it once lengthwise, or 6-8 times crosswise. I usually do the latter because it's easy to mess up the lengthwise cut ...


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Soak the rice for 10 - 30 minutes. Drain the water completely and in low flame fry the rice in 1 - 2 tbsp of Ghee and then add it to your briyani masala . If you are using pressure cooker, add the rice after the meat is cooked and make sure that the water just covers the rice. and pressure cook it in low flame and turn off the heat after one whistle and ...


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Simply cover your chicken breasts with streaky bacon. The salt in the bacon and also the fat from the bacon will keep the meat juicy.


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I nearly died from food poisoning due to an undercooked chicken but fortunately got to hospital in time. After 24 hours of vomiting and other nasty fluid emissions, the nurse woke me and cheerily remarked: "Good morning. We thought we lost you last night." Here's my recipe. Roast the chicken at 250 degrees centigrade and then roast it again. If it doesn't ...


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When freezing meat (or anything really), one of the main places where the texture will change is with freezer burn. This can be minimized by double wrapping and preventing exposure to air. An extra really great way to minimize freezer burn especially given that your dish has sauce, is to cover the food with the sauce and then freeze the whole thing as a ...


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Chris' link to Kenji Lopez-Alt's article (see Pasteurization Time section) is spot on: both temperature and time matter for food safety. However, the method you described seems to be questionable for getting well-cooked legs and thighs. At that temperature, legs and thighs will usually be chewy and bloody, although I imagine the length of time might ...


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derobert's comment about both temperature and time for food safety is spot on. Kenji Lopez-Alt also wrote a good article about this: http://www.seriouseats.com/2015/07/the-food-lab-complete-guide-to-sous-vide-chicken-breast.html (see the Pasteurization Time section) The method you described seems to be questionable for getting well-cooked legs and ...


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Two things seem to be the most likely culprits: You overcooked the meat (especially the breast) You didn't use enough salt, and applied it only superficially. A better approach might be to apply the salt a day before roasting, effectively dry brining the chicken. A challenge of roasting chicken is that the breast is easy to overcook (dries out beyond ...


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I just put egg on it, let it drip off a little, then just bread crumbs. I deep fry it, OR pan fry it this way and it has never failed me yet.


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I would cook it in a cream of vegetable or chicken soup if you want the easy short answer. Even chicken breasts turn out tender and moist for me this way.


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As a couple of commenters already mentioned, the base of the pressure cooker gets hotter than the rest, and chicken is no homogeneous size. I would like to add that besides the size difference between pieces of chicken, there is also a difference in tenderness. Breast meat is more tender so it will pressure cook faster, while legs and wings will be ...


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Because steam is hotter than water, any pieces of chicken submerged in the cooking liquid will take longer to cook, and pieces surrounded only by steam will cook faster. In either case, cooking proceeds from the outside in, so larger pieces of chicken will take longer to cook than smaller pieces. You mentioned that your mother heats the pressure cooker for ...


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Scarface was the nickname of the early 20th century American organized crime boss, Al Capone. He was slashed in the face while working at a New York City nightclub. The injury left a scar that led to the nickname. Capone's parents immigrated from Italy, and it is said that he enjoyed eating Italian foods. The notoriety and name-recognition of Al Capone ...


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Commercial egg producers only keep hens for their peak producing years. After that, they are deemed to old and are "repurposed." Being older, their meat is tougher, so they typically are packaged for use in slow-cooking dishes such as simmered soups and stews. Thus, "stewing hens." Chickens bred for meat are typically younger, more tender, and can be male or ...


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What you're looking for is sometimes called a Heavy Hen. In the supermarket, it will look much like a large roasting chicken, however the bones are larger and the meat is much tougher than chickens sold as roasters, broilers, or fryers. Heavy hens aren't as common in supermarkets as are roasters, but if they have them, it should be labeled as a stewing ...


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Most of the other spices are difficult to impossible to detect. I've gotten as far as paprika, onion powder and rosemary for sure. I think there is parsley powder involved as well. There is another couple that I'm close to identifying, but no luck yet. I want to learn what to put together, too, because I love KFC but my body can't handle it, so I want to ...



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