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1

I've experienced the same and have found that a shorter brine time yields a better texture. I prefer to dry brine boneless chicken to avoid that chalky texture. No more than 30 minutes for small boneless chicken to and hour for large bone-in chicken breasts. A large whole chicken can brine for about 3 or 4 hours.


3

Your temperature of 68 to 71 Celsius is very high for white meat. This is what makes the mini clumps in the breast you perceive as "chalky". If you cook it to a lower temperature, you will not have this effect, 60 to 65 Celsius makes "medium" doneness chicken meat. Note that food safety is a separate consideration, chicken is considered safe starting at 73 ...


1

350 degrees is very high temperature for tikkas, Use a 180 degree oven first you need to boil the chicken for 5 to 10 minutes on medium heat, than put the chicken in marinade ingredients and after 10 minutes ,put it in the oven .It’ll 20 minutes to cook.


2

Yep, you can fry anything in just butter. You only need to know that whole butter has a lower smoke-point (~350F,177C) than a lot of other oils, so it needs to be done a bit slowly. See this Smoke Point Chart: (the last column involves fatty acids, not relevant here) Higher smoke points of course mean the oil can get hotter without burning. For what it is ...


2

I think it may often just be fat/protein slime. Unfortunately, that's going to be hard to distinguish safe fat/protein slime from bad bacterial slime, so this is probably yet another time where you'll have to use your best judgment. If it's well before the sell-by date and has been handled properly, it shouldn't have dangerous spoilage. There should ...


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I strongly believe the sliminess of otherwise healthful sliced luncheon meats results from water added during processing. The food processor/manufacturer endeavors to inject as much water in the product as possible ... because selling water to their customers adds to their bottom line, and quite nicely. Here's some info, to consider when looking for ...


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Honestly, all three of those will crisp up very quickly, and just about any ratio will produce a crispy end product. The blend may be for textural reasons; potato starch is typically very fine and produces a tempura-like shell, while rice flour can have little bits of individual rice grains which produces a "chunkier" texture. I probably wouldn't try to use ...


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from the Vermont dept of Health: Salmonella organisms have been found in the stools of sick and apparently healthy people and animals. Most domestic animals, including ducks, cattle, swine, dogs, cats, pet turtles and chicks have been found to carry and transmit salmonella. The bacteria also has been found in a variety of wild animals. Thorough hand ...



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