New answers tagged

0

please sqeeuze some lemon juice and let the chicken absorb the the juice for a while(2 mins)


0

Salt will stay on or close to the skin of the chicken, so if you've over-salted the skin the simplest way to fix it is to remove the skin and not serve it.


3

The USDA recommendation for a safe internal temperature is 165 degrees for chicken. The breast, being leaner, shouldn't be cooked to any higher than that or it will dry out and be tough. The thigh can be cooked to a slightly higher temperature (165-175). That is the Kitchen Network's preference for taste and texture (link here). Getting the thigh to a ...


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Most store tenderloins are improperly done. They purposely cut the tenderloin where that tendon is so they can further process the breast into thins slice or "trimmed and ready breast" and not have that tendon in the way. Chances are the tenders you buy arent even tenderloin. When i buy boneless skinless whole breasts, and seoarate the tenderloin it looks ...


2

There isn't an especially right or wrong answer on this, there's benefits to both approaches. When I did the research to write the roasting planner for my meat app I found that there is a notable difference in cooking time when you leave the chicken out for 45 minutes to an hour ahead of time, the chicken left out cooks faster. I can't remember exactly the ...


7

One is pointless, and the other is very specific. Keller's approach - bringing the chicken out of the fridge 45 minutes before - is pointless, because there's no way in hell any significant proportion of a chicken is going to get from fridge-cold to room temperature in 45 minutes, or any other time that still allows it to be safe to eat. Point 1 in this ...


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using vacuum will help in opening the flesh and this will allow the brine to travel deeper


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I cook chicken thighs sous vide at 65°C for 90-120 minutes and they come out entirely suitable to my taste. I could probably go a little cooler, actually. I don't think you want to go super long because the meat becomes very mushy and unpleasant when you overcook it - remember, this kind of cookery doesn't overcook with temperature but with time, although ...


0

Dark meat should be cooked to at least 165°F to break down the connective tissues. I usually shoot for 170°F. White meat is marvelous at a considerably lower temperature as already mentioned. That is why cooking them separately is highly recommended. Finish off your meat under the broiler or on a grill to give it a better flavor, but use a high heat and a ...


1

Reduce excess moisture. Water rapidly expands and pushing/exploding the oil upwards. When you pick up a piece of marinated chicken/egged chicken, allow the excess liquid to drip off, or drag the bottom of the chicken against the side of the bowl before breading/coating. Ensure the chicken is completed coated, and place to one side to allow the coating to ...


1

Here is one solution, a spatter guard: It has a mesh screen that holds most oil, but air moves freely. This is just one, Amazon has many: Spatter Guard. For what it is worth, they don't have to be uni-taskers. They are great as steamers as well. Awesome for sticky rice or to steam veggies. Just put an inverted bowl on top. Most are stainless steel and ...


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For my chicken to be moist and tender and full of flavor when smoking or even turkey whole or halves or just the breast I shoot my whole fryers of chicken or halves or just the breast or even legs and thighs all of the pieces BONE IN!!!!! A MUST!!!!! FOR THE SHOOT FLAVOR (Beer not dark or whine not dark nothing dark and if you don't want to be seen in the ...



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