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Lemon is a bad substitute for any kind of vinegar because the acid component of those two ingredients is chemically different. In vinegar this acetic acid, in lemon juice this is citric acid. The taste of both acids is markedly different. When you only need a bit of rice vinegar, you can dilute normal alcohol vinegar 50/50 with water to get a similar ...


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Pressure cook or slow cook. Don't pressure cook too long or the meat you get will become dry and stringy. I prefer very slow cooking, often in the oven at about 190-220° for HOURS!!! Brining helps. I made one recently, cooked in a soy-based sauce. Cooked for about 7 hours. When finished, best to take the meat off the bone as soon as it's cool enough to ...


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You are going to get similar results but not the same flavor. I don't think you need to dilute the lemon juice although I would research the pH level of both, because this is the reason the recipe probably calls for the vinegar.


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To your specific questions, bone in thighs would work well and you would not have to add extra broth/stock to compensate for not using the breast. In fact, I would prefer the dark meat of the thigh in crock pot cooking as dark meat is very forgiving if over cooked or in long slow cooking applications. I would also wait until the end to cook the noodles so ...


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Hi there is no need to pre-cook chicken. If you put pre-cooked chicken in curry it will become over cooked and chewy like rubber. Put chicken pieces in the prepared curry base, make sure you do not add any water in it. Chicken releases its on water which gives a good flavor to the curry so let it cook own its own. Cover it with a lid while its cooking. Once ...


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There are a lot of different dishes, and not enough names, and different parts of the world don't agree with each other on what things should be called. In general, there is no standard for what a dish a certain name corresponds to. I believe for example Italy has standardized some recipes, but there are still people making their own version of that dish, ...


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Unfortunately, temperature is the only thing you can go by: the phrases 'medium heat' and '4/6 on the hob' don't really give us any information, and there could be significant variations in cooking time due to the shape of the wok, the starting internal temperature of the chicken, the shape of the breasts, and so on. With chicken, the entirety of the meat ...


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The reason chicken dries up when you are boiling it, or simmering it for that matter, is that the boiling process is all drawing away the oils. The oil holds the moisture in the chicken, therefore boiling the chicken pulls away the very thing that's allowing the chicken to stay moist. That's one reason why we baste turkeys and whole chickens, to keep it ...


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As noted already, your skin dries out from excessive washing, long showers, etc. This is because you are drawing out the oils in your skin and washing them away with the water. The boiled meat is going through a similar process. Also, as noted above, when you heat a piece of meat it tenses up. The heat of the water causes the fats to liquefy, the tensing of ...


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I have been in the kitchen for 30 years and still use a meat thermometer! I can tell when it's done through experience but I want to make sure as sometimes some thicker pieces take longer etc. I would rather be safe when it comes to meat and serving my family.


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It is a "metric" which requires experience to recognize. First, juices "running" clear doesn't mean that they will flow freely. You have to cut into the meat and look at the juice inside it. Is it clear or not? Second, there is a difference between the feel of meat at different stages of doneness, when you poke it with a fork. If you cannot notice it, ...


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I may be wrong but I'll give it a shot. When you heat chicken (or any other muscle for that matter) it tenses up. As it tenses up it is essentially squeezing juices out, because all the fibres are closer together. Just think what happens when you slice a rare steak without letting it rest, there will be blood everywhere. In general I believe boiling ...


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Sorry for the necromancy, but I have seen a documentary on the logistics of poultry farming on Dutch television that might shed some light onto this. The Netherlands produces quite a lot of eggs and so we also have a large supply of older chickens that are not sold through the regular channels. The documentary makers actually managed to follow a batch of ...


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Sure! You can make jerky out of any meat that isn't too fatty. Jerky is just meat that has been flavored and dried. The drying has to be done with care no matter what kind of meat you use, experimentation is playing with food-safety fire. Homemade chicken jerky for dogs was loudly in the news a few years ago because a lot of dogs got sick and even ...



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