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1

Are you cooking the celery, carrots and onions before you add them to the soup? As @Stephie says, you've got a classic mirepoix in those ingredients. I like to chop them pretty finely (though a food processor gives results that are much too fine, like a paste; don't use one for this) and cook them together in a tablespoon of olive oil until the onions are ...


0

Powdered soup mix can be a little light on flavors. Fortunately, a few common spices make for great additives to your soup. Here's a few things you can try. Bay Leaf: A tried and true flavor additive to any soup. Add one or two for a little extra flavor. Bullion Cube: Sometimes the broth doesn't have quite enough flavor, and adding a proper bullion ...


7

This may not be your issue, but the number one problem that cooks have is in the area of salt. Soup needs a lot of salt unfortunately or it tastes bleh and insipid.


2

I'm going out on a limb here and assume that using heavy cream might have dulled the percieved intensity of the flavours. So to add more "omph" you should add more of what is already in there. As the soup is done, you can't use anything that requires a long cooking time because you'd be turning everythinhg to mush. Granted, you could cut more vegies, ...


4

I would say its a matter of personal preference. One method or the other doesn't mean your chicken will turn out jucier, either of those methods can dry chicken out if not done properly. For your application, just cook the chicken how ever you enjoy it the best whether its those methods listed, grilling, frying, etc. As long as you cook the meat properly ...


0

I've had silkie chicken a bunch of times. It's going to smell more foreign, almost imparting a shitake mushroom taste, but it shouldn't have an eggy smell. However, I won't ever eat something that was not USDA inspected, so it's best to get the chicken locally. I get it freshly slaughtered at a chicken store.


2

Your grocery store has it down to a science. To get all parts "done" at the same time, they have to be cut to the right size. Your grocery store does that very well. The marinade flavors all parts, but the marinade doesn't carry flavors much (see here, different but similar: How deeply will the flavors in a brine penetrate chicken? (experiment results)) So ...


2

Firstly let me note that I have never prepared this breed so I can't speak from personal experience, just what I've come to hear and see. From what I've learned about silkies they're tremendously different to the regular breed of chicken we're used to. They're not well suited for roasting or frying and should rather be braised or prepared sous-vide (I ...


25

It's safe because freezing greatly slows (if not completely arrests) the growth of the bacteria that would otherwise make the meat spoil. It doesn't kill them, it just puts them in 'stasis'. The expiration date is given based on the meat only being refrigerated. If you intend to store the meat past its expiration date, best practice is to freeze the meat ...


5

The problem is that you're using a lid. Spatter screens keep the oil mostly contained, while still allowing any moisture to escape. A lid, on the other hand, collects the moisture on the underside of the lid. When you go to lift it, the water drops back into the oil, and causes increased spattering. You're actually better off without a lid, if you don't ...


2

As some of the comments suggest, "spicy chicken" isn't really specific enough to mean much of anything. You might be able to make guesses based on where you are. Heavily Italian places indeed might do something like hot Italian sausage, certainly. But if there's a variety of cuisine in your area, who knows. There's a Desi pizza place near me that puts ...


0

Here in Sydney Australia it's always there, always. Fresh chook(whole or thighs), charcoal chicken(bbq), KFC(Kentucky fried chicken), whatever. It's definitely not the oyster. I thought they might be testicles, but they would only appear in roosters, not chickens. I also thought they might be a kind of bone marrow deposit/reservoir like what humans have in ...


2

I've skimmed the other answers and I'm not seeing what I think is one of the most important tips for trying to pound out chicken breasts: temperature. Cold chicken simply refuses to play nice. Seriously. The difference between pounding out breasts fresh from the fridge and working with chicken that has been allowed to come up to temperature is night and ...


0

Plastic bags from cereal boxes work well; they do not shred even with a mallet.


3

Cook's Illustrated has tested beer cans enough that it would be totally reasonable to assume that Beer Can Chicken is safe, but if you want to avoid the can without spending money on a special pan, I just thought of an alternative to the beer can. If you have one...take the funnel section from angel cake pan, or tube pan...it fits perfectly! You should place ...


0

Just hold the end of the tendon down with a knife and use a fork in the other hand to pull the tendon clean through. The tendon slides in between the fork prongs. It's very quick and works. That white tendon in tenderloins suck. Typically just get breasts now for that very reason.


1

Id suggest turning the heat down to 300 and giving them around 3 to 3 and half hours. Keeping it low means if the buffet is late which is often the case they won't dry out left in the oven.


0

This doesn't always happen - it could be anything but most likely is the amount of time and water used. Not to mention the ingredients as certain ingredients can destroy meat. Try any of these options: At the very beginning when frying your spices and/or onions, fry the chicken pieces and then take them out so they're sealed. Add water to the pan and ...


1

Okay, you should remember when cooking with Indian flavours, unless it's a proper type of sugar, don't add anything to sweeten it. Orange peppers are incredibly sweet compared to the other flavours and using correct chillies in curries is a delicate process that takes a while to master. Now it's been almost two months since you asked this but if you do face ...


-1

The trick to keep vegetable nutrient, is by maintaining the right size of your vegetable. Big Size vegetable for long simmer, Medium size cut for medium simmer, and small cut for short simmer.



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