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26

Chickpea flour (gram flour, besan) is very useful in Indian cookery. The most common use in the West is probably for making bhajis and pakora. The most popular of which are Onion Bhajis, very popular in the UK. They are essentially an spiced onion fritter, shaped in either discs or balls. Any vegetables can be used to make pakora (which is essentially ...


12

The "solid vegetable oil" you're describing sounds like Crisco (shortening), which you can find in any US grocery. You could also try refined coconut or palm kernel oil, both of which are solid at room temperature. Another possibility to note is that the butter may be fine, but maybe the chickpea flour you're obtaining in the US is different.


11

Boy is THAT ever controversial. It seems that everybody has a theory as to why some beans float while most do not. The most common answer is that the "floaters" are older, and less hydrated to begin with. Some people insist that some beans float because worms have gotten into them. Hogwash, ignore those comments. The bottom line is that "floaters" are ...


11

Yes. Make it again and don't add horseradish. I'm totally serious - no traditional hummus recipe in the known universe has horseradish in it. There is nothing you are going to be able to do to your existing batch to remove that flavor, other than diluting it, but I don't think you'd be able to dilute it enough to be worth the effort.


8

There is no exact conversion because there are so many different varieties of chickpeas or any bean types for that matter Their water absorption rate and amount is effected by many things including how they have been stored, have they been heat treated on import, and what time of year they where grown! My rough rule of thumb for beans in general is 2.5 ±.5 ...


8

Chick peas (garbanzo beans) are amongst the slowest of pulses to soak and cook I find. It depends what is happening to them afterwards and how old they are as to the required process. If you need them in a canned state, then I would suggest a long soak, 24 hours is not unreasonable and I think at least an hour and a half cooking time. Longer soaks do ...


7

Growing up, my mother always used to bake them. They do turn out a bit drier than if you deep-fried them, but not overmuch. They cook for about 15-20 minutes at 400°F (~200 °C), or until golden and crispy on the outside. Alternately, you can pan-fry them, as other answers have suggested. Or you can split the difference and oven fry them. If you're ...


7

Roasted, salted dry chickpeas are a snack food. I would not expect for you to be able to make humus out of them; for one thing, they would have way too much salt, and the texture would be wrong. It might be possible with a lot of experimentation, but you'd need to go through several failed batches before you got one which worked. Personally, I'd just go ...


5

I soaked the roasted chickpeas for 24 hours or so, with a few changes of water, and they seemed to rehydrate just fine. I cooked them in a pressure cooker until tender (overall, about 50 minutes, in 15 minute stretches), and they ended up with about the right texture, but with a washed-out taste, and the water looked like a thin, white, chickpea broth. I ...


5

According to a quick search it appears that your notion about it being protein-based is correct. Most of the recipes I've seen say to skim it; the above-linked site says that adding a little oil will keep the foam down. I personally wouldn't do anything with it as an ingredient unless I had a truly massive amount of it to experiment with--I don't know ...


4

Chickpea - Garbanzo flour I use it in many ways. Normally I start with the whole pea and run it through my Vita-mix blender, quite often along with lentils, great white northern beans. Depending on my end use I may run the batch through a sieve and rerunning coarse through the blender again. The floured bean mix I keep some ready on the shelf for soup ...


4

In addition to what Orbling said, chickpea flour (called besan in Hindi), can also be used for making cheela or puda, which are like the Western pancake. Also in addition to the ones Orbling mentioned, Mysore pak is another sweet that can be made with besan.


4

Peeling chickpeas will give you a creamier texture, but won't have much of an effect on taste. The most efficient way I know of peeling them is to rub small handfuls in the palm of your hands. It will still take some time to work through them, but it's far more efficient than using your fingertips. One other possibility is to use a product similar to ...


3

I usually serve these as an appetizer, they're so good with a smoky seasoning blend. Using canned beans is where your process is falling down. Use fresh beans that you soaked and cooked. The age of the beans are the deciding factor between chalk and cream. I like to use a crock pot and all manner of seasonings. Other things I've found: Slightly overcook ...


2

You can read some special dishes which ask for chickpea flour on Wikipedia. Here you see some dishes which are more tastier because of the chickpea flour.


2

Soak them for twelve plus hours in cold water. They don't need Bicarbonate of Soda or any of that stuff. They need boiled for an hour or more, but they cook quickly in a pressure cooker (30mins or less). I also like to sprout the for a day or two for a fuller flavour and (allegedly) considerably more nutritional value.


2

The answer depends on where you live, and what type you have brought In many countries that import chickpeas they heat treat them to kill seed-borne diseases and insects. The heat treatment process makes them more difficult to cook, and soaking times double or triple Beans from exporters with phytosanitary certificates can be imported without heat ...


2

I have no guide other than my own experience, but since I am middle-eastern(ish) it'll have to do. Generally, every Arab or Israeli cook or cookbook I've checked with says that they need to soak for about 8 hours or so, and that more is fine. What they usually say is "soak them before you go to bed, and they'll be ready to cook before you get to them in the ...


2

You can pan fry them if you're careful (6-12mm oil). It helps to coat the balls with rye flour or similar before frying. Leave them alone to fry until the bottoms are nicely brown, then turn carefully w a metal spoon. If you have trouble with them breaking during the turning, you can flatten them from perfect ball shape a bit. However, that's best done as ...


2

Crumble a piece of (gluten-free)bread.(You can also rub two pieces of rusk biscuit against each other to get some dry crumbles). Make a mixture of a little bit of olive oil and the crumbles. Before putting the falafel in the frying pan, dip them in this mixture. Because the crumbles form a bit of a crust, it's easier to flip them over without them falling ...


2

We don't fry, pan-fry, or bake our falafels. Instead, we put them on a non-stick grill (same grill we use to make pancakes, etc.). I imagine that a non-stick frying pan would do the same. We don't use any oil at all. Depending on your non-stick surface, you may need to spray it with PAM or something similar. We get a fairly nice browning, but we end up ...


2

If your soaking time is 3 hours, and after 3 hours you are not going to cook them.... then you should take them out of the water and put them in an air tight container and keep them in the refrigerator. I usually do this and use my soaked pulses for over 3-4 days. In case you leave them in the water even after their soaking time.. they get extra soft and ...


1

I am not sure that baking will give you the texture you are looking for. On the other hand, there are many recipes available for deep fried chickpeas (garbanzos), such as this one from Martha Stewart, photo from her site: The common theme is to drain and dry canned chickpeas, and then deep fry them for about 5 minutes or so. They can then be dusted ...


1

If you do not want to use flour you might consider these tips: If they are turning into mush it is likely because your temperature is too high on your frying pan. Try turning it down to medium or medium low. Also, one thing you might try when making your falafel mix is to use the coldest water possible in it. This will help the falafel to stick together ...


1

I resolved this by using flour, it acts as a binder and thickener. Adapting the joy of cooking recipe, I ended up with chickpeas, onion, spices, flour and baking soda.It worked well though I ended up with something akin to a fried chickpea dumpling... I liked it, but not super traditional. I've read that if you want to make it without adding flour, you ...


1

Falafel can be baked in the oven for about 20 minutes using few tablespoons of oil around 200°C (392°F). You should be careful when forming the balls not to make them too large. It is better to make them a little bit thin to make sure they are well cooked, and help prevent stomach aches. After baking or frying, you can use a paper towel to soak up the excess ...


1

I suppose clarified butter(Butter Ghee) will solve your problem. It works well using liquid form with corn flour by adding a little water (just to keep dough together). It is easy to make butter ghee at home; basically one sauce pan and a spoon would be enough. The below link explains how to make butter ghee ...


1

For me, I think they are much better cooked at home than canned. I like to do them in a pressure cooker, for about 55 minutes at high pressure with a natural pressure release afterwards. Done this way, you don't need any soaking and they come out perfectly tender. Don't forget to add a few tablespoons of oil to the pot, to avoid foam clogging the valve.


1

One solution to getting garbanzos as easy to work with as the canned, it to can them yourself. I soak garbanzos overnight, then put them in quart jars and cover with lightly salted water. I pressure can for 55 minutes at 10 pounds pressure. By canning them myself, I know how much salt is in them, I have the convenience of opening a can of beans when I ...



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