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42

In Indian cooking we usually add Ghee (Clarified butter) to reduce the heat of a chili pepper. Most Indian dishes, we would add a good heaping spoon of ghee before feeding little ones. This helps temper the heat but keeps the flavors alive so that the children get used to them and can gradually learn to eat hotter foods.


25

Capsaicin is oil/fat-soluble so try washing your hands with a little whole milk, or rub with sour cream or vegetable oil and see if that helps. Just as you can get it in your eyes if you rub them with your fingers, I'm sure you can easily transfer it to your baby. I'm just surmising here, not speaking from experience so if you try any of these, be sure to ...


21

How archaic and fun! I whipped out some Google-fu and found the following for you: Tincture of Capsicum You can actually buy this on Amazon: Cayenne Capsicum Tincture 2 Ounces. It's available other places, but I saw prices as high as 2x this. (9 ml ~ 0.3 oz) Essence of Ginger This is from a late 19th century Jamaican cookbook (Classic Jamaican Cooking: ...


19

You can't really substitute cayenne pepper for black pepper. They're completely different, not even in the same botanical order. Cayenne pepper is a powdered chile. Black pepper is tiny drupe. The heat in cayenne pepper comes from capsaisin, and the pepperyness in black pepper from piperine. Closer substitutes would be white peppercorns (in moderation!), ...


18

The Wikipedia article on Capsicum reads, citing a FAQ on a page of the ollege of Agriculture and Home Economics of the New Mexico State University: Capsaicin is present in large quantities in the placental tissue (which holds the seeds), the internal membranes and, to a lesser extent, the other fleshy parts of the fruits of plants in the genus Capsicum. ...


17

According to my research, the effect of capsaicin that causes the burning sensation is indirectly responsible for the pleasurable release of endorphins, which are the brain's way of counter-acting the pain sensation. If you don't feel any burn, then you probably haven't consumed enough capsaicin to trigger the endorphin rush. This source from Northwestern ...


16

Yes, they can be, but you'll want to prick each one with a sharp knife once or twice to prevent them from bursting. Once that is done, put them into a small freezer-safe storage bag, remove as much air as possible from the bag, and seal it. They keep reasonably well for about six months without tasting "burnt," but they tend to be a tad mushy upon ...


15

Let a hot pepper (jalapeño or habañero, perhaps) soak in your liquid for however long it takes to achieve the desired hotness.


14

McGee writes: "Capsaicin appears to accumulate in the fruit concurrently with the pigment during ripening". (On Food and Cooking, p.212) So yes, chilis get hotter as they ripen (that is, as they turn from green to red). Many chili varieties are picked and sold in stores while still unripe and green (e.g. jalapeño, serrano, poblano), but you will ...


12

Korean chilli is a little different as it has a slight smoky flavour, in addition to being slightly sweet and also quite hot. The actual name of the chilli use in kimchi and for that matter, most Korean dishes is gochugaru (고추가루). It comes in a variety of preparations, typically, finely ground, flakes and a paste. You should be able to find this in most ...


12

Regarding the amount of "heat" in the recipe, I'd agree with @justkt that you'd want to go with 1/8 to 1/4 (at most) of the specified amount of black pepper if substituting cayenne. I like spicy food and go through a lot of cayenne (and other) chile pepper preparations, and they can vary a lot in terms of strength even within the same variety. So, I'd start ...


12

In most instances I've seen, in American cookbooks, "red pepper" refers to cayenne pepper or chili powder (not the spice mix designed for making chili con carne, but dried, ground chilis). It is usually spicy rather than being red bell pepper. Edit to add: I'm talking about this type of product: McCormic Ground red pepper Source


10

Unfortunately...I think that other answer gave some dangerous information. Sticking a raw pepper in oil and letting it sit out is dangerous. Not only could the moisture cause mold apparently but sticking something like that in oil runs the risk for botulism. You could reduce the risk of mold by using dried peppers, but botulism is still there.


9

Mythbusters tested capsaicin cures a few years ago. It was Episode 91 - "Shooting Fish in a Barrel" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MythBusters_%282007_season%29#Hot_Chili_Cures Whole Milk was their control as the already known go to cure, and nothing beat it. They Tested: water beer tequila toothpaste petroleum jelly wasabi


9

This site talks about this a bit. It says that ~60% of the capsaicin heat is in the pith and ~40% is in the seeds and other parts of the flesh. It suggests removing and discarding the pith and seeds to reduce the heat. It also suggests soaking the peppers in vinegar for a day. I guess depending on what you're cooking this may or may not work. Also, since ...


9

Granted, my peppers were farmed in California, not India, but they should be well within an order of magnitude of its variety's rating. Actually, they shouldn't necessarily. All chiles, are very sensitive to the environment they are grown in. Even trivial changes in temperature, humidity, and soil pH can affect the heat of the chile. The Naga Jolokia in ...


9

What is the world's hottest pepper? According to the Scovile Scale the hottest pepper is Bhut Jolokia. The one you are currently growing Scovile Scale Visualized What is a naga jolokia, and where does it stand in comparison to the other "contender" peppers? Bhut Jolokia or Naga Jologia According to some sources, they indicate that Bhut and ...


9

Most Comercial banana peppers are indeed pickled. This is relatively easy to do yourself or you can eat them fresh. Eaten fresh their taste varies depending on the capsaicin present but the vary from a bell pepper flavor to a flavor similar to a jalapeno. The amount of capsaicin varies widely between cultivars so ask your plant/seed vendor to inform you of ...


9

I've been slacking! Here are my (very overdue) experiment results. The blowtorch worked like a charm for almost all of the smaller peppers. I skewered the peppers, charred the skins with the blowtorch, just holding the pepper by the skewer, then put them in a tupperware container to steam. After which, they peeled beautifully. Before and after peeling. ...


9

Yes, you can usually make that substitution without a problem. The key thing in substituting peppers is that you like the substitution. So, experimentation is necessary to find what is ideal for you. Personally, I like the flavor (separate from the heat) of habanero peppers more than I like the flavor of jalapenos, but I usually have jalapenos on hand. So I ...


9

My general advice is just to taste your food as you cook it. Start with a little hot pepper and figure out the "heat level" you like, with whatever peppers you use, and then you can add more to calibrate the recipe. Keep in mind you can always add more spice with more peppers, but it's difficult to lower the "heat level." If you can stand to taste the ...


8

Capsaicin, the active ingredient that makes chili peppers hot, is not soluble in water, but it does dissolve in fat or alcohol. BTW, it is not an acid, but is a complex chemical similar to the main flavoring in vanilla; it directly stimulates the nerves. While washing your hands in vodka might be a little extravagant, you might try vegetable oil, and then ...


8

I live in France now but my mother used almost the same recipe for ginger wine. Boots the Chemist supplied the essences of capsicum, ginger, lemon and solution of burnt sugar etc. The tartaric acid also came from Boots winemaker section. The basic mix keeps for ages and is then added to the sugar and boiling water. Tartaric acid (not cream of tartar) is ...


8

Chili powder is typically a blend of ground chilies and other spices (and maybe even herbs). I'd go with a blend of: paprika (smoked if you can find it) cayenne cumin oregano garlic powder You can also try mixing in onion powder, other chilie powders, and black pepper. Some pre-mixed blends also include salt. If you have access to other dried chilie ...


8

Chilies are dried before grinding. There are several ways to dry them: Leave them in an exposed part of the fridge for several weeks. There should be a lot of open air around it, to allow moisture to escape. String them up outside. To do this, poke holes and run strings through them and tie the strings up so they're spread out. For best results, you ...


8

I've now found them on sale in a posh supermarket in Skopje, Macedonia. This time labelled: потекло скопско пиперки везени благи / кг Which Google Translate massages into: origin Skopje peppers embroidered mild / kg So an answer is "пиперки везени" or "embroidered peppers", for at least one name used in at least one ...


8

Yes, they will ripen off the vine (and gain capsaician in the process) because they are a climacteric fruit. They do this best in a paper bag, like most peppers. However, there is a limit to this because they will eventually wilt.


8

Each variety of chile has a subtly different flavor, but generally the kind to use is determined by how spicy you want the dish to be; spicier dishes need hotter peppers, otherwise you end up with a dish dominated by the peppers. For this reason, most people sort chiles by their spiciness, measured in Scoville Heat Units (SHU). The exact same papers can be ...


8

The term "ground red pepper" is ambiguous in English. Things sold under that name in the US have a wide range of heats, and likely are made from multiple varieties of peppers, though I'd say they're more commonly hot things like cayenne, or other varieties with somewhat less heat. That said, don't worry about it too much in these cases. Anything from mild ...


8

In Israel I have often seen hummus/falafel/thina served with a hot sauce called skhug, I have mostly seen the green variety (skhug yarok), which is a sauce made of fresh herbs, garlic, chili, lemon juice, garlic, olive oil, and some spices. Hummus is often just served with thina on the side and with olive oil, but there is a lot of variety ... I have seen ...



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