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14

Dilute heavily by using a very small portion of peppers per dish Allow cooking time for the pepper flavor to permeate the dish before adding more. It's not like black pepper where the taste spreads instantly. Remove the seeds and membranes holding them, as this reduces spiciness considerably Cut peppers very finely or puree so there aren't any large pieces ...


13

You'll find approximately as many recipes for chili as you will chili cooks. I find that I can make a great chili by simmering it for a minimal amount of time, no more than a couple of hours, letting the hot peppers do most of the work of flavoring it. (Here's my current chili recipe. I used to take three days to make chili.) Soaking and simmering for a ...


13

I believe that the "clichéd image" you refer to is popular (and cliché) because of chili con carne's long history of being cooked outdoors in big cauldrons or at least over an open flame. As any camper will tell you, iron is the traditional material of choice when cooking with fire. As for what actually happens - cast iron is a porous material, unlike ...


12

Cinnamon adds a different spice profile than chili powder or red or cayenne pepper would. It is a common savory spice in Indian food and I believe it's also used in savory dishes in Chinese cooking. It's a very versatile spice :). We also use cocoa powder in our chili as it provides a real depth of flavor (dark bitter flavors which are quite good in chili). ...


12

Put the chili in the fridge overnight, and the oil will gather at the top. Then you can just scrape it off with a spoon.


12

I add beer to my chili and simply let it simmer with the lid off for an hour or two so the liquid evaporates. I've never had a problem with overcooking.


12

What do you mean by "need"? Will the stew have a deeper, richer, more savory flavor if you brown the meat first? Absolutely yes, due the maillard compounds you alluded to. Is it necessary to brown the meat before the long braise in the stew for food safety reasons? Not at all. You can cook it unbrowned, and it will be perfectly safe assuming you ...


11

As noted above, reducing the liquid through evaporation will thicken up the chili but you run the risk of burning/scorching the bottom and it can take a long time at lower temperatures. What I like to do is to take some of the beans (I prefer black beans in mine) and mash them up into a thick paste and then stir that into the chili. The starches from the ...


10

I'm going to go ahead and phrase my comment in the form of an answer (just so there's something to accept or up/down moderate). My vote is for some form of beet. The more I think about it, the more I like the idea and think I'll try it myself when I get a chance. (I actually feel a little chagrin at claiming the idea since @SaUce mentioned borsch first. And ...


10

First, I concur with @SAJ14SAJ. An additional reason (that you may 'need/want') to brown the meats first is that it will allow you to drain a fair portion of the oils from the meat before incorporating into the remaining ingredients. Depending on the quality of the meats you have selected this could be a significant volume. Draining off this grease will ...


8

The hottest part of any chilli is the membrane the holds the seeds (contrary to popular belief that says it's the seeds themselves). If you remove this, you remove a lot of the heat. So if you want to try using ghost chilli, I'd suggest A) removing the seeds and membrane and B) chopping finely, then adding a little at a time to your dish, tasting after each ...


7

I just came back from a local chili festival where I was able to taste the ghost chili for the first time. My favorite by far was a dark chocolate and toffee brittle with ghost chili. You can absolutely taste the difference between the ghost chili and habanero. I was surprised at how different the flavors are, but folks who aren't used to using different ...


7

I use instant Corn Masa Flour as thickener. It seems to hold onto water better over time than does corn meal. That's likely because unlike corn meal, it's precooked, nixtamalized. Either way, you'll get a bit of a corny taste.


7

You have four immediate options as I see it: Lightly season the chili, remove a portion for your child, then season the rest to your liking Lightly season the chili, then serve it with additional accompaniments to adjust it to your liking (eg, hot sauces) Season the chili to your liking, but serve it with something to help cut the flavor for the child ...


6

We make vegetarian chili every few months, and use a combination of many kinds of beans. You can use kidney, cannelini (white kidney beans), pinto, small red, small white, roman, etc. We like Goya's beans. If the meat is tough, you may want mushier beans to add textural difference, so you might want to avoid black beans or black-eyed peas. (Unless they're ...


6

It looks to me like you have a couple of things going on here: You are worried about the safety of undercooked beans You want your beans to be palatable To address the safety issue, I think we'd need to know more about the kind of beans you're using. Kidney beans are the ones most well known to be toxic if they are undercooked. Other beans, say, great ...


6

One habanero per six quarts of chili, containing approximately one quart meat, provides a solid heat that an average palate can handle. I have cooked chili on numerous occasions for groups of people and found this formula works for most people. Typically I stack it with other, lower-Scoville peppers to produce a well-bodied heat. Other things to bear in ...


6

The answer to your question is given on the page you referenced. Since I'm going to be simmering everything for several hours, do I need to cook the rest of the meat before mixing with everything else? No, not unless you want to. In terms of ensuring the meat is cooked correctly, simmering for 2 hours or more is more than enough time. Should I? That's a ...


6

I've never known cayenne pepper to have any flavor, so if it is bitter you may have a bad batch, or the brand you are using may have put in additives that give it a bitter flavor. You may have other sources of bitterness: beer: brewers add hops to beer to give it bitterness, and some beer is more bitter than others, it depends on which type you chose ...


5

If you're going to simmer your chili for a long time, just throw it in there. If you made stock with it, you'd still be just simmering the bone for a long time to extract the same flavors. (I'm not advocating not using stock here, just that I wouldn't make stock for the sole purpose of getting flavor out of the bone. Use the stock you would otherwise.). ...


5

I think you've got a wide berth of possibilities but what's above seems pretty restricted. What you are listing above sounds like a pretty straight-forward Midwestern American chili. It has the features of the standard chili spices, beans and tomatoes, with a nice variety of meats. To try to engineer a Russian chili I would expect more indigenous foods. ...


5

Some people will call "sacrilege" and "cheating", but I find it perfectly acceptable to use part chili part sweet peppers (bell peppers work, but I prefer the long red kapia). Adjust the ratio depending on your heat preference. It also works with chili powder and red pepper powder. Of course, combining this with ElendilTheTall's advice for removing seeds ...


5

If you cook them long enough, they'll still soften up, you just might have to simmer them overnight or even into the next day. Although I'll refrain from the obvious jokes, prolonged cooking also reduces one other common side effect of beans. I'm sure you can guess what the side effect is.


5

Traditional Cincinatti chili calls for half a square of grated baker's chocolate. I don't know how set you are on fruit, but given the gaminess of venison, this might be less of a flavour clash than actual fruit. Unsweetened chocolate is usually used in the former, but if you want something sweeter, then you could substitute bittersweet chocolate here. If ...


5

If you want to thicken it fast use flour, just don't add it directly to the pot (If you do, the flour will clump and you'll spend the next couple of hours trying to de-clump the clumps). Use a bowl. To the bowl, add 1-2 tablespoons of flour and a cup of hot liquid from the chili. Mix/whisk both until combined. Add this mixture to your chili and stir until ...


5

Depending on whether you'd consider this a compromise (I consider it a feature), corn meal or crushed tortilla chips not only thicken it but also add a flavor that usually complements the chili.


5

Chili flavor doesn't necessarily mean heat, there are varieties that are mild but won't add heat. What is sold as chili powder in most places is medium heat variety, but you can use any ground chili. Paprika is a chili powder, as are ground chillis of any variety such as ancho, chipotle, tabasco, hungarian wax pepper, etc. So you can make chili with whatever ...


4

My understanding is that what many people call white chili would be considered a green chile stew in a place like New Mexico. It's not red in color because it doesn't have any significant amount of dried red chile in it--it gets whatever heat and chile flavor it has from green chile, which doesn't color the stew significantly. As to defining chili, I think ...


4

I find with chili that the pot is best used for initially opening up the flavors at higher heats. The majority of the work should be done in a crock pot or dutch oven, stirred every 20-30 minutes (but as @Martha commented, keep the lid on as much as possible to ensure even cooking). For opening up the flavors, you will need a pot for carmelizing onions, ...



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