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38

In Indian cooking we usually add Ghee (Clarified butter) to reduce the heat of a chili pepper. Most Indian dishes, we would add a good heaping spoon of ghee before feeding little ones. This helps temper the heat but keeps the flavors alive so that the children get used to them and can gradually learn to eat hotter foods.


25

Capsaicin is oil/fat-soluble so try washing your hands with a little whole milk, or rub with sour cream or vegetable oil and see if that helps. Just as you can get it in your eyes if you rub them with your fingers, I'm sure you can easily transfer it to your baby. I'm just surmising here, not speaking from experience so if you try any of these, be sure to ...


18

The Wikipedia article on Capsicum reads, citing a FAQ on a page of the ollege of Agriculture and Home Economics of the New Mexico State University: Capsaicin is present in large quantities in the placental tissue (which holds the seeds), the internal membranes and, to a lesser extent, the other fleshy parts of the fruits of plants in the genus Capsicum. ...


15

Let a hot pepper (jalapeño or habañero, perhaps) soak in your liquid for however long it takes to achieve the desired hotness.


10

McGee writes: "Capsaicin appears to accumulate in the fruit concurrently with the pigment during ripening". (On Food and Cooking, p.212) So yes, chilis get hotter as they ripen (that is, as they turn from green to red). Many chili varieties are picked and sold in stores while still unripe and green (e.g. jalapeño, serrano, poblano), but you will ...


9

Granted, my peppers were farmed in California, not India, but they should be well within an order of magnitude of its variety's rating. Actually, they shouldn't necessarily. All chiles, are very sensitive to the environment they are grown in. Even trivial changes in temperature, humidity, and soil pH can affect the heat of the chile. The Naga Jolokia in ...


9

Mythbusters tested capsaicin cures a few years ago. It was Episode 91 - "Shooting Fish in a Barrel" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MythBusters_%282007_season%29#Hot_Chili_Cures Whole Milk was their control as the already known go to cure, and nothing beat it. They Tested: water beer tequila toothpaste petroleum jelly wasabi


8

Capsaicin, the active ingredient that makes chili peppers hot, is not soluble in water, but it does dissolve in fat or alcohol. BTW, it is not an acid, but is a complex chemical similar to the main flavoring in vanilla; it directly stimulates the nerves. While washing your hands in vodka might be a little extravagant, you might try vegetable oil, and then ...


8

Chilies are dried before grinding. There are several ways to dry them: Leave them in an exposed part of the fridge for several weeks. There should be a lot of open air around it, to allow moisture to escape. String them up outside. To do this, poke holes and run strings through them and tie the strings up so they're spread out. For best results, you ...


7

This site talks about this a bit. It says that ~60% of the capsaicin heat is in the pith and ~40% is in the seeds and other parts of the flesh. It suggests removing and discarding the pith and seeds to reduce the heat. It also suggests soaking the peppers in vinegar for a day. I guess depending on what you're cooking this may or may not work. Also, since ...


7

I have found that roasting peppers and removing their skins can do a great deal to reduce the heat. I have a garden full of jalapeños and I roast many of them before putting them in salsas or eating them plane. The roasting does change the flavor, but I find that it mellows it out, while not eliminating it. It is your choice to keep the seeds or not, they ...


7

Yes, they will ripen off the vine (and gain capsaician in the process) because they are a climacteric fruit. They do this best in a paper bag, like most peppers. However, there is a limit to this because they will eventually wilt.


6

The standard advice is a paper bag, but I don't think it is optimal. I always put them in the smallest bowl that will hold them, and put a plate over the top of that. The idea is for the peppers to sit in their own steam for a few minutes while they cool down. The steam seems to loosen the skins. Whatever you do, don't take the skins off under running ...


6

Hmm, I'd look for pure Capsaicin if all you want is the heat. It's colorless/odorless so could work, but I'm not sure where you can find it. I've heard of white, hot sauces which may work for you, here is an example


6

I've now found them on sale in a posh supermarket in Skopje, Macedonia. This time labelled: потекло скопско пиперки везени благи / кг Which Google Translate massages into: origin Skopje peppers embroidered mild / kg So an answer is "пиперки везени" or "embroidered peppers", for at least one name used in at least one ...


6

One habanero per six quarts of chili, containing approximately one quart meat, provides a solid heat that an average palate can handle. I have cooked chili on numerous occasions for groups of people and found this formula works for most people. Typically I stack it with other, lower-Scoville peppers to produce a well-bodied heat. Other things to bear in ...


5

I don't know if it technically requires refrigeration, but I've always kept mine in the refrigerator and had it survive for at least 6 months with no noticeable degradation.


5

One sure way to reduce the heat is by adding some coconut milk powder. This thickens the dish a bit.


5

Pretty much everything I've read (for example, this page) says not to use wood, because the oils from the peppers will penetrate the board and transfer, and hold there indefinitely, even after thorough washings. This thread is full of people with personal experience transferring the heat to later meals. That said, as with Jefromi, I've cut hot peppers on ...


5

I chop pretty much everything on a bamboo cutting board, including chipotles en adobo all the time, and plenty of fresh peppers frequently. Admittedly I'm Texan and a bit acclimated to these things, but I've never noticed any residual heat in the board. And really, though my tongue may be used to it, I don't think my eyes are - and if the board were hot, I'd ...


5

When I go to the Korean supermarkets in LA, I usually see half an aisle just dedicated to 고추가루 in all kinds of forms (mild to spicy, fine to coarse grind) and colors. I don't know that there's any specific pepper than it is all about how sweet and mildly spicy 고추가루 is supposed to be. You could start from there to make your own by sun drying and crushing ...


5

What varities of chili peppers are most commonly used in Italy Peperoncini (=literally little big peppers) Grown and used in all Italy The green ones - Peperoncini verdi Used in north Italy, made under vinagre, typical Milano's recipe. They make it in airtight glass jars and open them in December for Christmas (or whenever) The red ones - ...


4

An easy way of incorporating a spicy kick into any existing chocolate cake recipe that uses actual chocolate would be to substitute a portion of the called for chocolate (with a matching chocolate type; i.e. dark and dark, milk and milk) that already has cayenne or some other hot pepper ingredient. Of course, you will need to experiment to get the right ...


4

Although this may be a different solution to the question, you might just try some of the more flavorful mild peppers in combination with the hotter choices in the recipes you prepare. A sweet paprika pepper is wonderfully flavorful. A minimal amount of habanero in a recipe would still impart its flavor. Roasting the peppers may also intensify the flavor ...


4

Szechuan (Sichuan) pepper husks can be brewed/simmered in hot water and results in a relatively clear broth that can be very "hot" and a much more interesting taste than refined or artificial capsaicin It also has that numbing effect that most people find rather interesting


4

Cajohn's Frostbite it is a clear hot sauce and pretty good for making mixed drinks


4

Both the seeds & the membrane can pack heat. While I believe the experts who say "it is the membrane" my experience is that it is easier to control the heat by removing the seeds and the membrane and adding some seeds back in to get to your target "heat level" in any giving recipe.


4

Tasting the peppers is absolutely the only way, short of a chromatography machine. This is especially true for jalapeños from grocery. This because, as stated on this site here and in other answers by myself and others, pepper spiciness can vary greatly even on the same plant. Accordingly, chiles mixed possibly from plants, even from different harvests or ...


3

I generally associate the phrase "chili jam" (also known as chili paste) with store-bought sauces, like this one. It wouldn't surprise me if they were using a very similar ready-made sauce - perhaps they get it from a distributor or perhaps they even make it themselves in large quantities and store it, but I doubt that they make it from scratch for every ...



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