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16

Yes, they can be, but you'll want to prick each one with a sharp knife once or twice to prevent them from bursting. Once that is done, put them into a small freezer-safe storage bag, remove as much air as possible from the bag, and seal it. They keep reasonably well for about six months without tasting "burnt," but they tend to be a tad mushy upon ...


11

Korean chilli is a little different as it has a slight smoky flavour, in addition to being slightly sweet and also quite hot. The actual name of the chilli use in kimchi and for that matter, most Korean dishes is gochugaru (고추가루). It comes in a variety of preparations, typically, finely ground, flakes and a paste. You should be able to find this in most ...


8

Chili powder is typically a blend of ground chilies and other spices (and maybe even herbs). I'd go with a blend of: paprika (smoked if you can find it) cayenne cumin oregano garlic powder You can also try mixing in onion powder, other chilie powders, and black pepper. Some pre-mixed blends also include salt. If you have access to other dried chilie ...


8

In Israel I have often seen hummus/falafel/thina served with a hot sauce called skhug, I have mostly seen the green variety (skhug yarok), which is a sauce made of fresh herbs, garlic, chili, lemon juice, garlic, olive oil, and some spices. Hummus is often just served with thina on the side and with olive oil, but there is a lot of variety ... I have seen ...


7

Make another batch of chili with no or reduced onions, and combine them--freeze if needed, so you can use it all. This is the only reasonly guaranteed way to resolve the issue. Chili freezes and holds very well, so this might be practical even though somewhat extravagent with the ingredients. I know that isn't what you want to hear, but it is the truth. ...


6

Since it is already made, simmer the chili at low heat for another hour or so allowing the onions to cook further and soften. They will slowly dissolve into the stew and the oniony flavour won't be as harsh. Generally all flavours will mellow out with cooking. (@citizen) Adding a bit of sugar or agave nectar may cut the oniony taste as a last ditch ...


4

I freeze whole chillis without any trouble at all. They seem to work much the same afterwards, but I wouldn't want to use frozen ones for anything in which they appear substantially raw, because the texture's seriously compromised. The heat and flavour seem to be more or less unharmed though.


4

I'm not sure I've ever seen chipotle paste called for in recipes; I searched around a bit and what I found was consistent with my experience. I saw chipotle en adobo, ground chipotle, and even whole dried chipotle. I also easily found recipes for chipotle en adobo. I don't think you'll have any trouble figuring out what to do with them. The most common way ...


4

Capsaicin dissolves easily in oils (and alcohol). Steeping or gently heating chili peppers in oil will easily produce a spicy oil. You could use crushed red peppers but you might get more interesting flavors by using a fresh pepper. A single habanero would give you an interesting fruitiness and all the heat you could ever want. As for the lemon- Lemon ...


3

Yes, you should be concerned. Botulism is obviously very rare, and most people never get exposed to dangerous amounts of it even if they follow unsafe practices. Nevertheless, simply heating/boiling a mason jar does not sterilize it, it only pasteurizes it, so this is an unsafe practice, especially when you add the element of room-temperature storage. ...


3

There's no reason why you can't freeze it. Just try and expel as much air as possible from whatever container you're storing it in for maximum longevity.


3

I would follow the age-old cooking rule that says you can always add, but you can never take away. In other words, I'd add, say, 6 chillis, see how that tasted, and add more if you think it needs it.


3

There are a ton of different extraction methods used in the industry and it would be very difficult to pinpoint which one is used for a particular brand unless they tell you. The "conventional", low-tech method is to use an alcohol solvent (capsaicin is alcohol-soluble; good thing to know in case you ever "burn" yourself with it). Very pure ethanol (grain ...


3

Growing peppers of the proper heat level I think will be the most important. If you like a lot of spice and grow Jalapeno peppers, then everything is going to taste like Jalapeno because you have to use a lot to get your desired heat level. If you have the appropriate heat level pepper, then a little goes a long way in a dish and you will feel it much more ...


2

A very flexible pepper that is also good for canning is the hungarian pepper. It allows for a good usage in fresh, uncooked dishes. Additionally it sautes well, goes great in salsas, bakes well, is great roasted, or just eaten on its own (ok, that may be a bit much for most people). For canning my mother-in-law does it in different varieties with sweeter ...


2

Unless you're really space limited, why not grow several varieties of peppers? I've never regretted having access to more options.


2

Since I don't make salsa everyday I hate to discard chilis that are given to me. I run them through a "Ninja" and then freeze them in small freezer bags. When I need to make salsa I take out a bag and with a sharp knife cut a slice off and added to my other ingredients to make a tasty salsa in the middle of winter or anytime. They never loose their flavor ...


2

Coriander, cilantro, and sage are more standby's for a good chili powder as well. Nanami-togarashi is an asian chili powder with a citrusy flavor from lime [peel?]. Also, dont be afraid to get some sinusy piquant goodness in there with a little ginger or mustard or turmeric (only a pinch or it may get closer to curry). You may also like to source the ...


2

I keep them submerged in a pot using the lid of the next-smaller pot to weigh them down.


2

When I am using dried chilis they are always pureed into a sauce. I don't like using them whole because I find the reconstituted texture to be unpleasant. I remove the seeds and membranes and cut them into the pan with kitchen shears to be toasted and then simmered. As they are cut up there is no problem with floating.


2

I have been following the advice of Homesick Texan on this one for awhile: Heat the dried chiles (anchos, pasillas, costenos, guajillos and chiles de arbol) in a dry, cast-iron skillet on medium for a couple of minutes on each side. Turn off the heat and then add enough water to the skillet to cover the chiles, and let them soak for half an hour. the ...


2

I had the same problem with floating chillis so I now soak mine in a cafetiere.


2

If you want chili flavor rather than heat then add the chilis in whole, they will keep their shape well. Just be careful about eating them, they will be fearsomely hot!


2

Most of the heat in a chili pepper is concentrated on the ribs and membrane that holds the seeds. By cutting out those parts, and using only the fleshy part of the fruit, you will get less heat. The heat can also be mitigated by dairy or fatty ingredients in the dish in which you incorporate the chili, as they tend to help wash away the hotness in the ...


1

Advance warning: I haven't tried this. It seems that you don't want to remove the ovaries because that would affect the shape, but you do want to remove the capsaicin from them. It's soluble in fat and alcohol, so you could try making a small hole in the bottom and pumping a light vegetable oil or vodka through from the other end using a syringe. Obviously ...


1

You could grind them with freshly toasted spices to make a nice curry base. Or throw them in the spice/peppercorn grinder grinder along with some dried porcini mushrooms and a bit of kosher salt to create a nice umami seasoning for steaks and other beef dishes.


1

I don't really understand why you think it'd get hotter if you scale the serranos the same as everything else. You certainly could play it safe by starting with less, but given the recipe, you wouldn't be able to add more in later. I would definitely use 12, so that you get as much of their flavor as you do in your normal-sized recipe.


1

You can also dry peppers by placing them on a cookie sheet and putting them in a closed car for about 3 days in the summer. It gets about 120-140 degrees in a closed car. I've dried peppers repeatedly this way. No ovens, no labor at all. Just remove stems and slice in half, place on cookie sheet, pop in car and forget it for a few days. JMP


1

I've never tried it, but the Encyclopedia of Country Living notes the following: Freezing Food That Contains Chili Peppers : Remove the chilies before freezing, or the stuff will get hotter and hotter! To freeze chilies by themselves, chop them up first. The thick and fleshy varieties are best preserved by freezing rather than drying. And then under ...



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