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9

Brew it strong and then add ice. Alternately, freeze some coffee in ice cube trays and use those frozen coffee cubes to chill the new batch without diluting it. Agitation (shaking) with cubes is a good substitute for crushed ice -- both ensure that the hot coffee meets the cold surface of the ice quickly. If you sweeten your iced coffee, using chilled ...


5

There is nothing especially interesting going on in a hot compote. You can chill it as quickly or slowly as you want to, until it reaches the desired temperature. Food safety requires that you don't keep it for more than 4 hours in the danger zone (between 60°C and 4°C), but if it is in individual serving bowls, on-the-counter chilling should be enough. ...


5

"Completely" definitely isn't a standardized term; however, since we're talking about making ice cream here, the correct answer is going to be "as cold as possible without freezing". When making ice cream, it's important to get the mixture as cold as possible before you freeze it, especially if you're not using an ice cream machine, so that you give it as ...


4

One of the fastest ways to cool something is with an ice bath. Pour your coffee into a large glass or metal bowl, and place that into an even larger bowl filled with ice water. Using a Bundt pan for the inner bowl will cool the contents even faster, as more of the pan comes into contact with the ice water than the bowl.


3

Make your coffee hot, then combine several easy methods to dissipate heat: 1) Pour your hot coffee into a metal cup (a martini shaker?), which has better heat transfer properties than ceramic or glass. For even quicker results, plan ahead by frosting the metal cup in the freezer. 2) Put the full metal cup in an ice bath. For an even colder ice bath, add ...


2

In the cowboy days, the people traveling through the western desert would carry canvas sacks which they would fill with water. The water would seep through the canvas very slowly, and wet the surface of the bag. Evaporative cooling would then keep the water cold (at least cooler). You could try something similar if you are in a dry climate (the rate of ...


2

I would suggest making the iced coffee the night before, brew it at double strength for best results. Make sure to sweeten it with sugar (if desired) after it's just been brewed. Pouring over ice the next morning will dilute it just enough to taste like the perfect cup of iced coffee. I prefer to make my coffee with an aeropress but French Press pot works ...


2

I've got a single-walled steel ice bucket with a tight fitting lid. I pour the hot coffee into it, close the top, and then shake it vigorously under cold running water for a few moments. That'll bring it down to room temperature nearly immediately, without diluting it with melted ice, and the bucket is really easy to clean. I keep the bucket in the ...


1

Cold brew is the best but sometimes I forget to make it - Just as a back up when I do make it I fill an ice cube tray with some of the cold brew coffee and keep it in the freezer. That way when I forget and have to brew hot, I can throw in some frozen cold brew ice cubes and boom cold coffee - no watered down taste - and if you brew a lil extra fill the ...


1

You could try the cold-infusion technique described by Harold McGee here. You can improvise a cold-brewing system using a French-press pot or just a pitcher or bowl, with fine sieves, cheesecloth, or cloth or paper filters to strain out the grounds. Infuse coarsely ground coffee overnight in cold water, about 5 cups for every 1/2-pound of coffee, then ...


1

Besides what @KevinSelker said, if you have sand available : wrap the food tightly, cover in sand, then add water. You're looking for evaporative cooling, so the water doesn't have to be cool. If you don't have that, and it's summer time, you can dig a deep hole, as the ground temperature will be near 65F if you get deep enough. When I used to go camping, ...



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