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41

There are really only a few secrets to good fried rice: Day Old White Rice (Make it the day before, let it cool, place it in the fridge) This I'd say is absolutely, the main thing. The texture will NOT be right if you use freshly cooked rice. There will be too much moisture. HEAT! Your Wok needs to be hot. You want everything to cook quickly. Cook ...


15

Well in Chinese cooking we use a wide variety actually. Typically speaking... Medium or Long Grain Rice White Rice Fried Rice Sweet Rice or Glutinous Rice Sticky Rice (You commonly see this at Dim Sum places in the sticky rice dishes wrapped in lotus leaves, among other places.) There are others of course, but those are the common ones you'll find ...


15

While Erlenmeyer flasks and graduated cylinders and food-science may not be able to save your leftovers, adding some cooked rice with fried egg (basically any fried rice recipe) will likely crowd out the saltiness of the base dish as well as extend your leftovers.


14

You're close. In actual fact, however, most of the commercial soy sauces and other Chinese sauces you buy are not fermented at all; they're acid-hydrolyzed. Fermented soy sauce (or other soy-based sauces) are actually translucent and fairly light in colour. But fermentation takes months, so manufacturers hydrolyze instead. The process is completely ...


13

Hibachi are technically a traditional Japanese device used for heating one's house. They are a basic, heat-proof container that holds charcoal. The cooking devices that many people refer to as "hibachi" are what the Japanese would call "shichirin": I'm guessing that the term "hibachi" was popularized in North America because "shichirin" can be hard to ...


11

OK I can read Chinese and let me tell you the answer: the noodles you bought are made by eggs. They're not made by rice. (FYI, there are TWO kinds noodles called "Rice Noodles", they are actually made by rice. The two kinds varies in thickness). You can first make soup noodles to grasp the texture of the noodles you bought. Try undercook and overcook a bit, ...


10

That is Classic Series Guava Candy made by HongYuan. You can buy a 14oz bag on Amazon, here.


9

When cooking Chinese ribs, they are usually boiled down... (I am a cook from Hong Kong) We usually cut the ribs bone-attached into small cubes before cooking, quite unlike the western cooking style. stir-frying: Usually we stir-fry the rib with a sauce of choice; black bean and chili is my favourite. One can also use the sweet-sour (sometimes with the ...


9

Are there different qualities in prepared Hoisin sauces? Think of it like barbecue sauce or chili powder: every company has their own recipe, and it's always hard to know the precise justification for a specific price. The high price on one may be part of their premium brand image, and have nothing to do with the quality of the ingredients. ...


9

It becomes quite confusing when talking about the difference between chow mein and lo mein mainly due to the error in translation. In Chinese chow mein literally translate as "fried noodles." However when buying chow mein at a chinese restaurant, you get vegetables with a side of deep fried noodles. Somehow the title of a dish is referring the to side ...


9

I am answering the question as I understand it based on our discussion in comments. Step 1 - Choose the restaurant wisely. As a rule you don't want big fancy restaurants and you certainly don't want to even try in a chain restaurant. You want the holes in the wall run by members of the ethnic group that matches the cuisine. When you enter the restaurant, ...


8

You want your rice to be fairly dry for stir frying. If you cook some rice specifically to fry, put in the minimum amount of water for whatever method you're using. As others have mentioned, it works well if you use leftover rice that's a day or two old. Then, when you're actually frying it, it helps if the rice isn't clumped together (as it usually is ...


8

Near as I can tell, it's probably the local economics. It seems to me that the cost is different per "component" but would probably balance out in the end. Chinese food, generally speaking, relies more on fresh vegetables (carrots, peas, bean-sprouts, broccoli etc.) and meat. This means that the storage costs and spoilage costs are higher relative to Indian ...


8

A number of Chinese restaurants are happy to prepare it without pork or beef. I've seen it with pork (most common) or beef (sometimes). A vegetarian Chinese place that I occasionally visit uses a "vegetarian ham" along with some vegetables like peas to augment the custardy texture of the soft tofu. I like to add some ja tsai (zasai, depending on ...


7

The easiest fix for this problem is to use rice that was made up to 3 days ahead. I will plan the menu to have a meal with rice on night 1, make extra, and then use that leftover rice for SF rice on night 4. If you are making it fresh, use less water so the rice will be a bit dry. Use high heat, and cook the rice in a wok. This also helps.


7

My fried rice started getting closer to east coast restaurant style when I started doing a couple of new things: Use Chinese 5 Spice Powder - Like Indian Garam Masala, this is a spice mixture that is so common in Chinese cooking that it's sold pre-mixed. I've started using it in a lot of my chinese cooking. It makes a big difference. Add a bit more soy ...


7

Glad you asked! I'm a Chinese person who lives in Shanghai. Based on what I see and my girlfriend's preferrence, native young guys in Shanghai are after rice from Thailand, in Chinese "泰国香米". It looks long and thin, just like @talon8 said. This kind of rice has sweet smell. Personally, I prefer rice from Wuchang. Wuchang(五常) in a place in Heilongjiang ...


7

Light soy sauce: "is a thin (low viscosity), opaque, lighter brown soy sauce, brewed by first culturing steamed wheat and soybeans with Aspergillus, and then letting the mixture ferment in brine. It is the main soy sauce used for seasoning, since it is saltier, has less noticeable color, and also adds a distinct flavour." Dark soy sauce: "a darker and ...


7

Pretty sure it is pigs blood. its commonly used in south east asia countries and hong kong.


7

Per AsianResearch.org's article The Ancient Theory Behind Chinese Food: Generally speaking, foods that have a higher water content are considered cool, or yin, in nature. These are often foods that are boiled or steamed. Foods that have a higher energy content, particularly from fat, are considered warm, or yang, in nature. These are often foods ...


6

Depending where you live it can be hard to get hold of useful Szechuan pepper. What you want is just the outer shell of fruit, not the contents Many governments force importers from China to use high heat to sterilise these on import, and most of the active ingredients seems to get whacked during this process Find the most "Chinese" shop you can, and buy ...


6

I think it's four major things: Use enough oil - If you don't use enough, you don't really get a proper frying action, and rather just heat it. So make sure you use enough. The downside, is that too much can make it disgustingly greasy. So be careful, but don't skimp. Let it sit - When you put the rice in, don't stir it too much. Let it sit for long ...


6

A couple thoughts... I haven't tried this, but I've heard of people doing it. The microwave works relatively well to steam things. You could try "steaming" the dumplings in the microwave with a bit of water at the bottom of the dish or better yet, cover with a wet paper towel. You'll probably need to do some experimenting unfortunately. Under "ideal" ...


6

The Chinese use what is often referred to as black beans, but they're actually fermented soybeans. Azuki/Adzuki beans are the beans used in red bean paste. Most often, they're sweetened and mashed. But I don't see any reason you can't use them in Hoppin' John. I'd temper the slight sweetness of the azukis with a bit of black bean paste to give a more ...


6

You cannot remove salt once it is in your food, so you either mix it with something else as @mfg says, or throw it away. I'd just chuck it and never grace that restaurant with your presence again.


6

If your noodles are mushy, then you're overcooking them. Vermicelli take barely a minute or two to cook in already-boiling water. Egg noodles take a little longer, but either way, trying the noodles as they start to loosen up is the best way to ensure the right texture. Remember, you are going to be cooking them again when you stir fry them, so they should ...


5

One important thing to keep in mind is that the blade always stays against the knuckles of your opposite hand to control it. That is true with all knives but I find it is especially important with a cleaver. (Well probably except when you are doing giant hacking moves, in which case your other hand should be nowhere in the vicinity).


5

The secrets to my fried rice: Fried eggs: start by frying some eggs, scrambled with some salt, at high temp, in oil. It should turn brown and fluff up in layers. I usually let it sit until it forms an omelet-like circle, then turn it over to brown the top. The browning is essential for the flavour (I wouldn't eat my breakfast eggs this way). Remove from ...


5

Something to add onto the answers given above. "Chinese fried rice" is a very broad term. Because different regions in China produce a wide variety of rice, there are just so many different ways to fried them. While using day old rice is common among house-holds to deal with left-over rice, it is not the authentic way to fried rice. Most chiefs use fresh ...



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