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1

Next time get the really really small ones. Those are best raw. The bigger ones usually are fried first before eating. Then the bones get crunchy and the saltiness is not as prominent. Others are used for stocks or garnishes, as said before.


3

I think what's really happening here is mostly physics, rather than any magical reaction between the meat and the "velvet" (i.e. egg and cornstarch; I'm going to use this term for brevity). The largest effect is that the velvet adds a thin, clingy coating to the outside of the meat. When introduced to heat, that's providing a barrier to the movement of ...


1

According to [http://www.melindalee.com/recipes/velveting/] '[...] stated by noted chef Ken Hom, that "velveting" is "a technique used to prevent delicate foods from overcooking…..The velvet coat protects the flavor and texture of the food when it is placed into hot oil or water." So, velveting is not exactly a tenderizing method – but it keeps foods from ...


2

From what you have described it sounds like Santon sauce may be a variation of Shandong sauce which is often served in Chinese restaurants alongside Crispy Skin Chicken. Here is a basic recipe that can be found on many internet sites. Perhaps it can be a starting point for you. 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped 2 chilies, finely chopped (I finely strip them ...



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