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You're right, it's the coconut oil. Notice how shiny the batch was fresh? That's the oil separating. It would need constant stirring while cooling to keep droplets from forming. Steady cooling - I got that graininess in ice cream once by freezing too quickly from room temp. Got an ice cream churner around to try with just fridge temp?


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The quality of the result you get depends on the quality of the ingredients you use, plain and simple. If you want really good chocolate coated peanuts you have to use good chocolate, and there's no way to get around that. There's no harm in using compound chocolate - it will work - you just won't get a result that is as tasty or has the same mouth feel as ...


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The difference is that compound chocolate is a low-cost substitute of lower quality than real chocolate. Accidentally, I am not sure that your "basic chocolate bar" is real chocolate either, the standard brands like Milka in Europe or Hershey's in the USA use a lot of foreign fats too. Is it a good idea? Only you can tell. If the compound chocolate is good ...


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The answer to Yoghurt preparation is Yes, yoghurt can be prepared via Soy milk. Soy yogurt can be prepared at home using the same method as dairy yogurt. One tablespoon of sugar per 1 liter of unsweetened soy milk may be added to promote bacterial fermentation. Soy milk on its own lacks the lactose (milk sugar) that is the basic food for the yogurt bacteria. ...


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Inverted sugar (or any of its cousins: dextrose, honey, HFCS) won't help you, as what is happening is not recrystallization of the sugar, but that cocoa butter is solid at room temperature (it has a fusion point of 28-36 °C, 82-96 °F). What a chocolatier would tell you is that chocolate and water are natural enemies, and they don't belong together. If ...



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