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The brainstorming in the comments has provided numerous examples: Candy cigarettes These are likely the most realistic sticks you will find, as they're usually completely white, but fairly soft so use care when attaching the muffin to the top: Pocky / Mikado These are chocolate covered biscuit sticks, they're much more sturdy but not the right colour: ...


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The difference between carmelization and the Malliard Reaction When cooking seeds and nuts, you are essentially carmelizing various basic sugars and amino acids (the components of protiens) via the malliard reaction. This is what gives a grilled steak a different flavor than a boiled one, just like white table sugar has a different flavor from carmelized ...


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Yes, an emulsifier is the way to go. Lecithine is an emulsifier, and will work. The downside is that it might impart a slight eggy taste, I don't know if this will be a problem for you. Also, it is a bit harder to store than the other emulsifiers, it tends to lump from ambient humidity. The more common emulsifiers for your case would be xanthan or guar ...


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Most commercial chocolate does not have a shelf life. Batches are dated for processing and tracking purposes but there is really no inherent limit to how long it will remain shelf stable assuming it remains below about 30C / 85F and in a correctly controlled environment. Chocolates that contain preservatives typically do so because they contain ...


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Yes, that's a very standard substitution. For each square (ounce) of unsweetened chocolate in the recipe, use: 3 tablespoons (20 grams) natural cocoa powder (not Dutch-processed) plus 1 tablespoon (14 grams) unsalted butter, vegetable oil or shortening Joy of Baking I'd add that Dutch processed cocoa (if that's what you happen to have) is fine too, ...


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I think adding a few drips of vegetable oil or honey could help! Always heard other people say that.


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Tempered chocolate spends a bit of time as firm but pliable before it turns completely hard. You could try cutting and shaping the chocolate into panels during this time, then apply them to the cake after they finish hardening.


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According to the Domino's nutrition guide, the cake includes both "fudge" and "cookie cake". The center is probably the fudge, which is basically a mixture of chocolate, sugar, and fat so that it stays soft as long as it is warm, and would contain much more sugar than the cake. Domino's Nutrition Data


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From online comments, this copycat recipe seems pretty accurate. So, they're not dissimilar to traditional lava cakes. The soft, flowing "lava" is just batter that isn't cooked. From the copycat recipe: Domino’s makes their cakes in the pizza oven. The secret to the gooey center is that the cake is baked at a high temperature to solidify and crisp the ...



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