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The way I've recused a ganache is to use a emersion blender to pummel the mixture - it's amazing how it can turn a grainy oily mixture into a perfectly smooth shinny ganache. Always give this a go before throwing away a mixture.


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It's simple. For a semi sweet baking chocolate substitute in a pinch, for each ounce of semi sweet chocolate called for in the recipe, use 1 Tbsp. Cocoa 1 1/2 Tbsp. (4 1/2 tsp) sugar 2 tsp. Butter For a substitute for 1 oz of unsweetened baking chocolate, use 3 Tbsp. Cocoa Powder 1 Tbsp. Butter


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For microwave smores, I top 1/2 of the graham cracker with a Hershey bar square and microwave for 30 seconds, then place a marshmallow on the melted chocolate and melt for a few more seconds (maybe 15 seconds), until the marshmallow increases in size. Then remove and top with the other 1/2 graham cracker.


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Cocoa powder also adds starch, which helps with structure. The plant stores starch in tiny, hard granules, but these granules swell and absorb water as they heat up (when your cake hits the oven). Eventually, they swell too much and burst, releasing individual starch molecules into the liquid around them. These long molecules tangle with each other and ...


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I add cocoa powder and sweetener to a mug, then add skim milk. Microwave for a minute or until almost boiling, and it should be completely dissolved. Since you're trying to make chocolate milk not hot cocoa, just chill it afterwards.


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Some basic math, assuming spherical candy and the type of foil that fits snugly w.o. twisting the ends (like thin aluminum foil): 3" foil -> covers 0.95" candy w.o. overlap -> aim for scant 3/4" balls 4" foil -> covers 1.27" candy w.o. overlap -> aim for 1" balls 6" foil -> covers 1.91" candy w.o. overlap -> aim for 1.5" balls I figured 3.14 for Pi would ...


2

I heard of chocolate bars which are eaten in hotter regions (by soldiers?). The chocolate is brittle, dry and doesn't melt in the mouth. To prevent the eater trying to let the piece of chocolate melt in the mouth the chocolate should be mixed with ingredients that should be chewed anyway - like nuts. I assume that this kind of chocolate is not tempered. I ...


1

No, there aren't. Nobody likes untempered chocolate. Try taking a bar of pure chocolate. It's tempered. Now heat it up to 50-60 Celsius. Let it cool down gently. What you have now is distempered chocolate. There is no accounting for taste, of course, but whenever that happens, people tend to cry out "Help! My chocolate is ruined!". I have never met ...


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Tempering is a process used to give solid chocolate a uniform appearance and texture, as well as to insure that those qualities are shelf-stable. Most commercially available chocolate is already tempered to some degree so that it has a pleasing appearance and texture for customers to enjoy right out of the box/bag. Tempering is required when the final ...


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It sounds as if you may not understand exactly what "tempering" is. You can't buy "tempered" chocolate. Tempering is the processes that makes it workable. Chocolate is made up of a whole bunch of different fats, each with its own melting temperature. "Tempering" is, simply, raising the temperature so that they have all melted, bringing it back down to ...


1

If there is no heat, the chocolate is not melting; something else is going on. The closest thing I could find to an explanation was on this site about how chocolate is made: Cacao is a rich source of insoluble but water absorbent fibers (cellulose, primarily) which tends to cause the particles to draw in the water and swell up, further disrupting the ...


1

Milk chocolate is usually made for eating, not for baking. In any case, even if you are using a milk chocolate that is meant for baking, you need more than milk chocolate and eggs to make a chocolate silk pie. Your desired result is light, smooth and consistent throughout. To get there you need to add volume in the form of air, typically by folding in ...



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