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11

It depends on what chorizo you're using. If you're using soft (i.e. uncooked) chorizo then no, you don't need to remove the skin, because it should cook with the sausage. If you are using the cured, ready to eat chorizo you should take the skin off as it will be tough. This may well vary by brand, incidentally.


10

Certainly, no chorizo skin is going to poison you. On that basis, if you're happy with your results, then carry on. I have used chorizo where the papery skin peels off quite easily -- but I have never seen a need to remove it.


6

Without knowing the constituent ingredients of the sausage it is difficult to give exact advice. There are generally two types of chorizo fresh (or cooking chorizo) and cured chorizo. Fresh or cooking chorizo is made with pork, red wine, smoked paprika and salt (along with some other spices depending on the particular recipe). The alcohol and salt combine ...


4

Sausages are pretty forgiving. As long as you don't burn them or leave the center raw, they should come out OK. Since they're pretty fatty (at least the good ones are) there's little chance of drying them out, so when in doubt, cook them a little longer. They'll feel firm, not squishy, when they're done. The easiest way to cook raw sausages is in the oven ...


4

halloumi or feta for cheese substitutes, especially if you can get the mint halloumi cheese. as for ham substitute, I'd recommend toasted pita (served on top of the salad where you let the eater crush the bread themselves) or smoked salmon


4

The cured chorizo available at my local grocery store actually has a plastic skin so obviously that must be removed in order to make it edible. It also has metal clips holding the ends closed, so it's pretty clear that you're not supposed to eat it. So, if you do choose to eat the skin, make sure it's not plastic. Again, it should be pretty obvious.


3

You can't use methylated spirit to cook that way. Methylated spirit contains 1% pyridine to deter people from drinking it, and it will taint the sausage (and no, they don't say what is in it on the label). The way that excise tariffs are set up, you could buy pure alcohol in UK, but the duty would drive the price to about £75 per litre. Better to buy pure ...


3

What you are after is commonly called Methylated Spirits, or Meths. Also known as denatured alcohol It is made from ethanol (ethyl alcohol) and tainted with a dash of methanol to make it unfit for human consumption. It is usually coloured purple In many countries it has a bittering agent added (check the label, or taste it), since many people seem to want ...


3

When talking about chorizo, it's worth specifying Spanish (papery skin, fairly dense, often cured) or Mexican (often plastic skin, loose, usually uncured). Same name for two very different products. Mexican should be peeled, Spanish usually shouldn't.


2

From what your friend tells you, it will be a cured Chorizo. When a cured Chorizo is soft, it could be hung to dry, or it could be used for cooking (or it could be eaten as it is), depending on your preferences. Cured Chorizo can be kept hanging in a cool dark place for a long time. As the moist evaporates it will dry out. Once it starts to get tough, it ...


2

It looks like it'd be nice served on some crushed potatoes (Anya would be my choice, as they taste great and I have loads from the allotment, but any new waxy style would be good). Just boil 'em till they're just done, squash each one with the back of a fork once, put on the plate and spoon the salad on top. The potatoes will soak up the juices and make ...


2

Slice off a chunk you need, shallow cut length ways, run under tap and ensure all skin is damp, peels away easily.


2

I purchased los angelitos chorizos in NJ the casing is hard has metal on ends. it says remove casing before cooking. It makes sense-the casing is plastic and I am more concerned with bacteria.


2

As you go further west from Russia the borscht often has pork sausage to replace the beef shin etc. If you like it spicy, often chorizo is then substituted for the plain/spiced/smoked pork sausage It's not everyone's ideal of a meal, but with a good dollop of sour cream it's great!


1

Fresh ... needs to take on the flavor of the sausage


1

You could try getting some Irish Poitín, which is 180 proof, however, I don't know if it's legally sold in the UK. It is carried in the duty free stores in Heathrow and on the ferries to Ireland, though. You can get laboratory grade, additive-less grain alcohol from here, however, it's £27.98/L + duty (and I think the minimum order is for 2.5L). I don't ...


1

Are they loose or in a casing? If they are loose then you should be able to cook them just like you would ground beef. Sausage is generally fairly fatty so you shouldn't need to add any oil or anything. I'm more familiar with chorizo which tends to be quite fatty, but if the others seem a bit dry you could always add a touch of oil to help them along. If ...


1

To be super safe, boil them covered in water for 15 mins, then sear in a lightly oiled very hot pan.


1

Use your oven and bake at 150°C (300°F) for about 50 to 60 minutes. They should be crisp skinned, fully cooked (for taste and food safety), but still soft to the bite If you run the oven any hotter they may split or explode Section the sausages and lay them out evenly on an oven tray (with some edge or 'lip'). You can pack in as many as you can fit into ...


1

I find the answer depends on what you are doing. If the recipe is one where you add whole chorizos to a bean stew say, for slow boiling with the beans, then you will need to keep the skin on. This will tend to hold it together and limit oozing to either end of the sausage. the lovely paprika flavours will seep out into the stew, but the sausage will be ...


1

I like the crushed potato idea. Other possibilities: cubes of blue cheese (eg gorgonzola) grilled chicken breasts fresh steamed asparagus / peas / green beans leafy green salad (rocket, spinach, maybe add some pine nuts) roasted / grilled portobello mushrooms bruschetta or pitta bread Now that I think about it, even a rice, pasta or cous cous base would ...



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