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17

If you're going to store anything leafy in a plastic bag, I wrap it first in a paper towel, then in the plastic bag, so none of the leaves touch the bag. This prevents the issue where the outer leaves turn to goo. (I'm not sure what the actual biological issue is ... moisture/condensation? poor respiration?) Don't wash it before storage, as the extra ...


15

Personally I think the best way to store fresh herbs is to use a small herb garden. I just planted one and found it very useful for things like thyme, rosemary, and parsley. If you don't have room for a small herb garden then a plastic bag in the fridge is usually the next best thing. Update: Cool link on popular mechanics on growing a garden in 5 gallon ...


13

I've found it freezes quite well — I simply wash it, chop it roughly, and then freeze it in a small plastic bag.


10

Use it to make pesto, super easy and you can use the pesto when ever you need cilantro flavor in a dish. You just need a food processor or even a blender, place the herbs inside and blend while slowly pouring oil into the mix. I normally make mine two handfuls of herbs to a cup and half of oil but you might need to play with the ratio to get a mix that ...


9

Anything Thai. There's a particularly fun Thai green curry that you make with fresh Cilantro (though I daresay we call it coriander over here), lots of garlic, some hot green peppers, and about 6 different spices. I don't have the recipe on hand, but Google is your friend. If you're making this, add the flesh of a fresh mango, it's incredible. Anything ...


9

Basil: Make sure the leaves are dry! Use a papertowel to dry them off. Then, trim the end of each stem, and put the basil in a glass of water. Avoid having any leaves below the waterline. Change the water regularly. Keep it at room temperature. Parsley and Cilantro: Same instructions except refrigerate with a baggie loosely over the herbs. Be sure they're ...


7

Cilantro lime rice! I eat it on burritos, or by itself. I'd link you a recipe, but I haven't made it in a while and can't remember how I do it. It's basically: Rice Cilantro Lime Juice Salt Cilantro's also interesting in salads (like everything green).


6

Refrigerator storage methods Some tender herbs (ex: cilantro/coriander and parsley) can be refrigerated by placing them in a cup of water (like a bouquet of flowers) and covering with a plastic bag. And like a bouquet, you'll want to change the water regularly. Ref: JustRightMenus, Michael Pryor You can also get away with simply wrapping them in a paper ...


5

I tend to wrap any leafy vegetables/herbs in paper towel or put them in a paper bag when putting them in the crisper. Instead of retaining the moisture, it lets it escape preventing the nasty sludgy rotting effect of dampness. It'll maybe give you a few extra days as the stuff will slowly dry out or wilt, but shouldn't become slimy.


4

Take a cup and fill with water. Put the cilantro in the cup (as if they were flowers) Place a ziploc bag over the top of the cilantro and loosely fit it around the top of the cup Place the cup in the fridge. It should last a VERY long time like this. I learned this from Joel.


4

StillTasty.com has good instructions for fresh cilantro and parsley. BTW: the advice for these 2 happens to be the same but it's not the same for all herbs. For example, here's their advice for basil. Their site has good advice for other herbs and foods as well. The one thing that they do that drives me crazy is disabling highlighting so I can't ...


4

Coriander, the plant, is the one whose leaves are called cilantro in many regions - the Spanish name for the plant. Of course, in some regions, the leaves are called coriander (or coriander leaves) as well. Coriander, the spice, is indeed the dried fruit/seeds of the plant, commonly sold both whole and ground. The seeds have a very different flavor from the ...


4

I would try Lime Basil or a mixture of 1/2 vinegar, and 1/2 bottled lime juice (small portion).


3

These are the seeds: These are the leaves of the more common variety (there are many others): While dried seeds are full of aroma and flavour, dried leaves are not. BTW, it is VERY easy to grow cilantro (as parsley) in a pot, just use the seeds ...


3

Chimichurri sauce: Good on chicken, pork, shrimp, beef. Usually about 3 cups of loosely packed leaves, a combination of cilantro, parsley, and basil. Add garlic, 1/4 cup red wine vinegar, 1/2 cup olive oil, salt and pepper to taste. Put it all in a food processor. Cilantro is also great in homemade hummus! Use lime juice instead of lemon, add some cayenne ...


3

This writeup suggests substitutes: I've quoted the most promising option. It seems that Vietnamese Coriander is not really from the coriander family and closely mimics the flavor of cilantro. Let me know if this works. Vietnamese coriander or Persicaria odorata is a herb, the leaves of which commonly feature in Southeast Asian cuisine, ...


3

Cilantro is one of the herbs that doesn't retain much flavor when it's dried; it's unlikely to be particularly tasty when made into a tisane. On the other hand, the dried seeds of the plant -- called "coriander (seeds)"* -- have a pleasantly tangy and floral/citrusy taste. They are occasionally used as a flavoring agent in beer, so it's perfectly ...


3

My method is similar to Joe's, but I skip the plastic bag entirely. I wrap a bunch of herbs in a towel, then put a few ice cubes in a fold of the towel. They melt slowly enough to keep the towel just a bit moist, and our herbs last for weeks.


2

i actually have had a bit of success keeping it in a small vase on the counter, out of a lot of direct sun! i change the water every day, and trim the ends of the stems a bit to keep the ends from going slimy.


2

Freeze it. Most herbs freezes well and do not lose the scent easily. The only caveat is that the color is usually lost. It is rather a trade off. In a way, drying preserves more of the color and presentation of the herb, but freezing preserves more of its flavors. In my opinion, get those resealable bags, put them in, squeeze the air out, put into ...


2

Salsas Cilantro is a great ingredient in both red and green salsa. While prime canning season is over in most of the northern hemisphere, you may be able to find quality versions of the rest of the ingredients for either fresh or cooked salsa.


2

Recaito. It's a sort of chutney/sauce of Hispanic origin that's (more or less) a paste made from onion, peppers, oil, salt and lots of cilantro. I've had it made with some lime in too. It's used more as an ingredient (like for making green rice) than as a condiment, but I can vouch for it being kind of nice served over something like a nice hot grilled ...


2

How about a chutney? As far as Indian food in the US goes, one of the two common chutneys is a green one chock full of cilantro (the other is tamarind). I've only made it once, and I can't remember the recipe, but googling for green chutney, cilantro chutney, or hari chutney results in quite a lot of hits.


2

According to this The Hour For Tea blog entry, cilantro is one of several ingredients in a tisane for which it claims some medical benefits (emphasis added): Catnip tea was used as a sedative, along with lavender, chamomile, coriander or cilantro; peppermint could also be used to loosen phlegm, and a tisane of thyme with honey was used as a sore ...


1

Cilantro (or as the rest of the world calls it, coriander) is one of the most ridiculously applicable cooking herbs I have had the privilege of using. That said, you are correct - when dried, it's application becomes far more limited (to a far greater extent than most other herbs and spices). I have successfully used dried coriander in english stews, ...


1

Cilantro tea is used in several Ayurvedic remedies. You will need approximately 15 minutes to make cilantro tea. Here you can get how to make Cilantro tea.


1

Instead of drying the cilantro, why not just plant the other half in good potting mix? You won't have to run to the store for fresh then. It grows quickly too! I have both dry and fresh. The dry doesn't stack up. It has a much less pungent flavour. It's good in a pinch.


1

If you are cooking a curry or Asian dish, perhaps Thai basil or purple basil would work instead. If you are cooking a Mexican style dish, Mexican oregano might also be a good choice. I have also read that celery leaves are a good substitute, but they can be tricky to find as most stores only sell the stalks. Sometimes you can find bunches at the Farmer's ...


1

It's a great additive to a cous-cous salad.


1

Guacamole. I understand your frustration. I like it fresh, but I don't use cilantro in large enough quantities to go through the smallest amount they are sold in at the local grocery store before it rots. So I bought a jar of dried cilantro for the occasional times I want it.



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