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18

The very thin outside layer of the Lime, Lemon, Orange, and other citrus. It contains aromatic and flavorful oils that will enhance your meals. When you zest your citrus fruit (usually with a fine grater) you need make sure that you only pull off the zest and not the white pith that lies underneath. The pith is bitter and generally not something you want in ...


17

You don't. Citrus fruits, unlike most other fruits, do not ripen after being picked from the tree. The only solution is to be proactive and not buy unripe citrus.


12

Orange zest is where most of the oil is. This can be removed with a grater and some patience, or a peeler if you have a light touch, but the best way is a zester. They are fairly expensive and only do one thing, but they are the best tool for the job. Mircoplane makes a nice line, and I have no complains about mine. You want to avoid scraping the white pith ...


8

What you have there is simply water seeping out of the gel and bringing some dissolved stuff with it. This is known technically as syneresis. What will help is to add something stabilize the gel. Xanthan gum is probably the easiest thing to use. You can find it at health food stores or Whole Foods because gluten-free bakers use it a lot. Start with 1/8 ...


7

You might be able to counter-balance it with other flavors (salt, sour, sweet, hot), but you're likely still going to have some bitter notes come through, it's just a question if it's tolerable or not, and some people dislike bitter more than others. (I can't understand how people can drink beers other than lambics) In looking at a similar thread on ...


7

There are three (to the best of my knowledge) main factors at work here: Pectin. This is a gelling agent, a bit like gelatin. Fruits such as apples and plums are very high in pectin; citrus fruits are not that high in pectin but citrus peels are incredibly high, so if you're using any of the peel, you're getting tons of great pectin. Obviously, the more ...


7

The best way to remove wax from citrus is simply to wash it with dish soap under warm, running water. Don't obsess about how long you should wash the fruit; usually the wax application is very thin and quickly removed. There is no easy way to tell whether you have removed the wax, so if you return citrus to fridge after removing the wax, you might want to ...


7

There is unlikely to be any single answer to my question since the coating can be any one of a number of substances including, Natural or synthetic resins Carnauba wax Shellac Tall oil Paraffin Oxidised polyethylene Candelilla wax Beeswax Corn, soy or milk proteins These may be disolved in a petroleum based solvent, emulsified with a detergent or ...


7

Short of using an electric juicer, the squeeze press type of juicer is very popular for doing large quantities of citrus quickly and efficiently. They are both fast, and squeeze almost all of the available juice, getting the best of both worlds. These come in sizes that are best for limes, lemons, oranges, or even grapefruits.


6

I recently did some experimenting on this exact topic. I can't contribute anything to the safety part of your question, but I have some notes regarding flavor. The experiment: I blind tasted lemon zest in a group of associates and friends with varying degrees of palette development. Most people were able to differentiate between fresh zest with wax and ...


6

For making large amounts of margarita, I've found it hard to beat a press like this one: It extracts almost all the juice in one easy movement. I don't see the benefit in a rotary juicer.


6

tl;dr: Grapefruit oil is the most likely missing link. Squeeze some grapefruit peels into your mix, or pick up a "food-grade" or "therapy-grade" essential oil (for extremely sparing use). In the absence of more information, I'll go ahead and take a broad pass at this. As I mention in comments, more data will help us get closer. As a starting point, ...


5

Besides Xanthan, that Micheal mentioned ... some custard pie fillings will call for use of some sort of a starch (eg, corn starch), which will help prevent the 'weeping' problem, and might be something you already have in your pantry.


5

They should be quite a bit softer than a standard Eureka lemon, because the skin is much thinner. That said, it shouldn't be like a gentle squeeze causes your finger to sink in 1/2 an inch. If that happens, I think you've found a batch that are too old and have started to get mushy or lose moisture. Keep looking for good ones - Meyer lemons are terrifically ...


5

It's the colorful outer layer of the peel. The white part is the pith, and you don't want that as it imparts bitterness. You can remove the zest by using the part of a cheese grater that you would use for parmesian cheese. If you're really careful, you can also use a vegetable peeler, but it's difficult to avoid the pith.


5

I've made a similar cake before - note that it uses clementines, not just any oranges. This is an advantage because their skin is thinner and less bitter than larger oranges. The cooking softens the peel enough to puree smoothly, and helps release the orange flavor from the peel. It's not really about reducing biterness; some of the bitter flavor may be ...


5

Yes, you can squeeze citrus too much. That bitterness you sometimes taste in citrus fruit comes from limonin, a compound that most people can detect at concentrations as small as a few parts per million. In many citrus fruits the limonin is created once the acids of the juice vesicles interact with LARL, a tasteless substance in the fruit's tissues ...


5

Some fruit juices can be heated to drive off excess water (especially those with a higher sugar content) but citrus doesn't tolerate this well. Fresh-squeezed citrus will get bitter and acrid if reduced. Instead, squeeze your citrus as normal and freeze the juice in an open container. Once it's set into a solid block, place it into a funnel or strainer ...


4

Orange oil. It also comes in lemon and lime - it's far more concentrated then extracts.


4

Another option: confit the orange peel in a mix of vegetable oil and white wine, say for 30 minutes at 200F. This peel could then go in closer to the end of when your cooking as its going to be soft and more edible directly.


4

Triple Sec, Grand Marnier, or Blue CuraƧao


4

You can peel them and then pull the segments apart very much like an orange, but it is only modestly less messy because the segments are too big to easily stick in your mouth whole and they squirt when you bite them. Plus their peel is often pretty tough.


4

I'd say your best bet is segmenting the grapefruit before trying to eat it. Here's a good video about it. How to Peel and Segment a Grapefruit Downside: It's a lot more work, and you still wind up with a juice-covered cutting board that needs to be washed.


4

Depends on how fine you have shaved the rind/zest, you can consider candying it (boil it in syrup till it become very transparent) or dip it in chocolate after candying it. if it is too fine, then add it into your next chocolate recipe to get orange-flavoured chocolate....


4

I've successfully frozen yuzu (a Japanese citrus fruit slightly similar to lemon or grapefruit) zest for two or three months without much damage; the flavor isn't perfect, but it's usable as long as you don't get serious freezer burn. I've kept it in a small Rubbermaid container. There is a potential problem because citrus oils can damage certain types of ...


4

Well, if it comes directly from Southern Italy you could use it to make some Southern Italy specialty like pastiera napoletana, sfogliatelle napoletane or cannoli siciliani, all of which require candied fruits. Traditionally pastiera is done with a mix of candied citron and orange peel plus candied pumpkin (cucuzzata) which however is not the easiest ...


4

While the pith of citrus fruits can be very bitter, there is no juice in it. To extract any liquid from pith would require much more pressure than any squeezing-based juicing equipment at a bar is likely to generate. A centrifugal juicer is more likely to produce a bitter flavor if the pith is included with the fruit, as small bits of pith will end up in the ...


3

Segmenting the grapefruit is likely the least messy way, however, if you like the half a grapefruit thing: There's something called a 'grapefuit knife', which has a curved, serated blade you can use to loosen the segment before you try to scoop them out with a spoon. You'll end up with a fair bit of liquid left over at the end, but you don't end up ...


3

There are noted resources for flavor pairing, many of which you can find on this site. Check out flavor. You'll find: Why some flavors work better together than others A list of books and websites providing information on flavor combinations, including suggestions for FoodPairing Khymos The Flavor Thesaurus cuuks (here's a start for your combo) The ...


3

I'm not as familiar with citrus, but tomatoes and peppers can develop something called blossom-end rot. This is caused by the plant not receiving enough nutrients (specifically calcium), whether b/c the plant isn't getting enough water and thus can't get the nutrients out of the soil or b/c the soil is deficient. Regarding whether it's safe to eat, a ...



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