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31

Kosher salt and a small amount of vegetable oil. Scrub the pan with the salt on a rag or paper towel, if there are stubborn bits mix a couple drops of oil with the salt, wipe dry with clean towel. If you use a wet method to clean the pan re-heat it after cleaning to make sure it is completely dry before storing.


28

Smoke is normal in an electric oven, but flames are definitely not. In order to start a fire, you either need a spark, or you need to heat something beyond its autoignition temperature (AKA kindling point). You might have had a short - or you might actually be using a gas oven with spark ignition - but I'm guessing your issue was the latter. Cooking oil ...


25

Capsaicin is oil/fat-soluble so try washing your hands with a little whole milk, or rub with sour cream or vegetable oil and see if that helps. Just as you can get it in your eyes if you rub them with your fingers, I'm sure you can easily transfer it to your baby. I'm just surmising here, not speaking from experience so if you try any of these, be sure to ...


25

Let's call a spade a spade: if you're in one of many areas where people don't eat vegetables raw, it's because nightsoil or unsterilized animal manure is used to fertilize the fields. A quick rinse won't render these vegetables safe to eat, because you need to kill the pathogens. To start out, you should wash all dirt and sand off produce; for this wash ...


23

You could get yourself a specialized sieve brush - the things are meant for mining sieves but cooking sieves are generally the same size (0.5mm - 1.0mm, the latter being the no. 16 that the first link is talking about). I haven't seen any of these sitting in home kitchens - could be that they aren't effective on cooking sieves, but more likely, cooks just ...


22

Well even for knives with no wood, a dishwasher is a very hostile environment. The reason is primarily for the blades. If you have quality knives that you care for, and plan to keep for many years, then it's just not worth it. It's just too easy for a knife to be jostled around and bang into other knives or silverware and get nicked. You mention that you ...


20

Besides what @Janelle said, for really stuck on stuff, use a similar process as you'd use to deglaze the pan -- While the pan's still hot (or heat it back up if you've let it cool), and then add some cold water. Some should instantly steam, and should hopefully be hot enough to boil a little. (don't add so much water that you cool down the pan). Scrape ...


19

Clean it immediately, before anything has a chance to dry. As soon as I'm done grating anything, I run the grater under water and wipe it with a sponge. Wipe with the direction of the blades, then run a little water inside it. Optional: put the grater in the dishwasher to clean fully.


18

I can answer you with first hand experience and a picture. Your lovely dark gray finish will become light gray, streaked, and hideous. I'll never buy this style of pot again, it is just too useful to be able to dishwash them sometimes.


16

Your primary defenses against cross-contamination include proper planning in the order of what you're cutting and proper cleaning between uses. In the case of your stew, simply cut the vegetables first and then cut your meat. Doing so in this order you won't need to wash the board between the vegetables and meat. If you want to expedite the cooking ...


16

Lining with foil works well with cooking methods like baking or broiling, where the food is not stirred or manipulated much, and so the foil can sit undisturbed. With stir frying, you are quite likely to break through the foil while doing the stirring, and have to clean up fully in any case. Also, you probably would not get as good a stir fry due the thin ...


15

Residual starches swell up and get sticky in hot water. This doesn't happen with cold water -- In the time it takes to wash a pot.


14

Is the liquid inside the handle? Some ice-cream-scoops are hollow and have a liquid on the inside to help heat conduction - this helps melt the ice-cream and prevent it from freezing to the scoop. Here's an example: http://www.amazon.com/Zeroll-1020-Original-Cream-Scoop/dp/B0002U34EW/ref=sr_1_11?s=kitchen&ie=UTF8&qid=1407359424&sr=1-11 Note ...


13

Another alternative is to go to an East Asian grocery and pick up a wok cleaner, which looks like a tiny little broom made of stiff sticks. It does more-or-less the same thing as the coarse salt. I find it particularly useful for cast iron grill pans, as it's easier to get leverage on burnt-on material than when using salt. It'll cost you maybe two dollars ...


13

I'm still happily using a non-stick frying pan that I've had for almost 4 years. I only use Teflon utensils. I never use harsh abrasives. After cooking, I fill it with boiling water, let it soak for a while and then wipe out with paper towels. Most of the time I just give it a quick rinse and it's ready for the next time. And buy quality - "Quality is ...


13

I have worked in two professsional kitchens. The main kitchen itself (all the work tables, stoves, floors, refrigerator fronts and so on) is cleaned after each service, and very thoroughly each night with hot soapy water and sometime sterilizing solution. The insides of refrigerators and other storage areas don't need to be cleaned that often because ...


13

I put mine in the dishwasher. If that doesn't get it clean, soaking it for a while and then brushing it with a stiff brush usually does the trick.


13

A oven is a box for containing high heat. It really is the best place to have a fire. Though electric ovens are not supposed to have fire in there they do a fine job of containing it. Even if you somehow manage to set the heating element aflame (I've done this and still don't know how). Leave it closed and wait for it to go out.


13

Absolutely not. You need to boil them if you're even THINKING about canning. Chances are you'd be fine, nice acidic relish to keep the bacteria down...But do you want to take the chance? Even if you have one of those dishwashers with a nuclear "sterilize baby bottles" cycle, don't trust it. For canning, you need them as close to medically sterile as is ...


13

For hard, chemical-resistant surfaces such as marble, bleach or peroxide cleaners will help. On things like counters, pots and pans, a Magic Eraser will often take off the stain. Sometimes a harsher abrasive like Comet or Barkeep's Friend will be needed. Softer or porous materials, including cloth and many plastics often CANNOT BE UNSTAINED. In my ...


12

Bar Keeper's Friend in powdered form and some elbow grease will solve this problem. The first time you tackle it, it can be a real pain to get the pan cleaned up, but if you keep up with it regularly after that, it's not to bad. Great cleaning supply.


12

The method I use is to leave on high for a few minutes to burn off the worst of the food residue. Then I scrub it with a wire grill brush and , while still warm, I then re-oil with cooking oil. There are proprietary products you can use and I've seen people using oven cleaner but I steer well away from those!


12

my 'nuclear option' for cast iron skillets is to put them in a basin of lye solution, and let the pan sit for a week or a month (depending on how fresh and how concentrated the lye solution is.) We keep a plastic basin out back for this. lye is bad stuff, so if you have kids or pets, do please be careful. The lye, however, will take off anything organic, ...


12

These soaps are simply soap-shaped lumps of stainless steel. You'd get the same results from rubbing a spoon on your hand, or rubbing your hands on the sink. There's a ton of anecdotal evidence that stainless steel works; unfortunately there seems to be very little scientific evidence backing it up. I've never read any in the past, nor was I able to find ...


12

I alone on the planet seem to have solved the endless problem of cleaning the fine holes of an espresso portafilter, or a Moka express fine steam filter. None of the liquid or abrasive cleaning apps work, period. Instead, in the past, one had to use a pin to poke out the minute holes — task so laborious and hopeless than most espresso and Moka machines in ...


11

Expensive knives can survive a trip through the dishwasher, but like others have mentioned, they can bump into things, end up with coatings of detergents and such, suffer damage to wood, etc. Why would you do that to an investment? Cheaper knives will just straight out rust/corrode, even if you remove them and dry them right after the cycle. Yeah, you can ...


11

Be careful with cold water in a hot pan - since the pan is metal, you shouldn't have to worry about cracking, but you will get a nice burst of steam in your face! Your best bet is to deglaze the pan immediately while it's still hot, or heat it back up and deglaze it. There are some tips in this thread. As a bonus you're going to get a delicious pan sauce ...


11

I generally clear my clogged misters / spray nozzles by unscrewing the spray part from the bottle and then submerging the uptake tube in very hot (but certainly not boiling!) water and then pumping as long as it takes to clear the clog out and start spraying a mist / spray pattern again. The hot water should be enough to break up the clogs, and the pump ...


11

Generally, yes, to wash off any chemicals that might have been used to finish the plastics or rinse any sprue away. If you're going to be putting the dishwasher on anyway, you might as well throw them in.



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