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There really isn't another name for Dutch processed cocoa. You could perhaps look at the ingredients or label and search for some reference to alkalization. Cocoa powder, Dutched or natural, consists of a single ingredient: cocoa. The difference is that Dutched cocoa has an extra step in the manufacturing process. Normal cocoa powder is created from cocoa ...


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According to David Lebovitz: Because natural cocoa powder hasn’t had its acidity tempered, it’s generally paired with baking soda (which is alkali) in recipes. Dutch-process cocoa is frequently used in recipes with baking powder, as it doesn’t react to baking soda like natural cocoa does. So, if you're using non-Dutched (natural) cocoa, you can use ...


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Yep, cocoa and cacao are the same thing. The 72% has sugar making up the rest of the mass. The description on amazon actually mentions that it's 27% sugar and 43.5% cocoa butter. The rest is cocoa solids, the chocolate-y stuff. As you say, that particular brand is pretty expensive; it's also pretty popular and well-regarded. Since it has plenty of sugar in ...


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Yes, it is perfectly safe uncooked, although it may be unpalatable without being sweetened. For example, you can make your own chocolate milk mix with cocoa powder and powdered sugar. Simply mix it into milk, without cooking, and enjoy. It is also dusted uncooked as a garnish or accent on some pastries or cakes.


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Cocoa butter has an exceptionally high melting point for a vegan lipid. For most baking applications, it probably not ideal; you would be better served with a liquid oil, or if you need something solid but malleable, a hydrogenated vegetable oil product like a vegan margarine. The main culinary use (in general) is thinning chocolate in creating chocolate ...


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As for the difference in labelling, there is no difference, as Jefromi already said. I could imagine some producers calling more-or-less raw liquor "cacao" and the processed product "cocoa mass", but this is not standard usage. While there is no difference between the words, the product may still be very different. The problem is that cocoa mass with the ...


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The fleshy party of the fruit of theobroma cacao is is supposed to be sweet and pleasant. However, it does not taste like chocolate. Chocolate is made from the nibs or seeds within the fruit of theobroma cacao, after it is fermented ground, and processed, and is in no way sweet. The nibs themselves are very low in sugar, and contain alkaloids (such as ...


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Cocoa powder is made by baking the cocoa beans and then removing all the fat from them, then milling the rest to a powder. In fact, semisweet chocolate is a solid sol (a colloid formed from homogenically dispersing solid particles (cocoa dry matter) in a solid (cocoa fat)). What you should add is not water, but fat. Before you start, you must be aware that ...


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While you can certainly substitute powdered carob for cocoa, the flavors are distinct enough that you will likely need to adjust your ratios and sugars to make carob blend into a recipe better. Use less sugar than you would for powdered chocolate. I found this description http://www.natural-health-restored.com/what-is-carob.html of Carob, and this ...


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Cacao is actually the name of the tree. The beans in the Cacao pods are fermented and processed to make chocolate. Pure chocolate has two main components: cocoa solids and cocoa butter. Cocoa mass listed on labels contains both cocoa butter and cocoa solids. Some manufacturers list the percentage as cocoa or cacao (as refered to in some non-english ...


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Store cocoa powder in a dark, cool, dry place, sealed against vermin. Dark and cool both slow the process by which volatiles (i.e., flavor) degrade. That said, don't keep it in the fridge or freezer unless sealed airtight, because both types of chill-chests are relatively humid environments. Humidity promotes mold, even on cocoa. By the way, for future ...


2

You can substitute carob powder one-for-one in recipes that call for cocoa powder. I do it all the time for my husband and son, both of whom are allergic to chocolate. That being said, carob doesn't melt the way chocolate does, so trying to make ganache just doesn't work (been there... makes a MESS!)


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Chocolate flavor depends a lot on fat, preferably cocoa fat. I would try using high-quality dark chocolate (70% to 99%) instead of the cocoa powder, or at the very least weakly de-fatted non-dutched cocoa powder (most cocoa powder in the stores is highly de-fatted). I would also throw out the butter and use chocolate instead. I would only try playing around ...


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Looking at your recipe, the most obvious thing to me is that there is no salt. Adding a small quantity of salt (say, 1/2 tsp) will enhance the flavors of the ingredients already present. The second thing you might try is switching to dutch processed cocoa; many people find this has a more intense chocolaty taste. You could try enhancing the overall flavor ...


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There are two ways to define nuts, one botanical and the other culinary. Botanical: It is a dry fruit containing one or two seeds, where the fruit does not open to release the seed. So, only indehiscent fruit are considered true nuts. eg. Walnut (image), pecans, chestnuts. Culinary: A lot of seeds are called nuts even when they do not conform to the ...


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Rather than a substitution what you really need to ask is what changes you need to make if you leave the cocoa powder out. Vanilla extract is a very concentrated liquid and the recipe already calls for 1 teaspoon of it, so adding more vanilla may not even be necessary depending on the result you are trying to get. Maybe an extra 1/2 tsp. Cocoa powder is ...


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You cannot substitute chocolate chips for cocoa alone, as they contain sugar and cocoa butter (fat), as well as cocoa solids—assuming you have quality chocolate chips that are true chocolate. The ratio of these ingredients will depend on the exact chips you have. A reasonable approximation for the general case per What's Cooking America assuming you ...


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Every fruit and many vegetables you eat are seed carriers. That's true from acorns to zucchini and there's a huge variation of types and structures. Many tree nuts seem to be descended from a common ancestor which contain a particular strain of protein that sets of allergies, while other fruits and vegetables (including cocoa) do not. Nuts by definition ...


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In the context of the labeling, they mean "tree nut" free, as many folks are allergic to tree nuts. Technically, cocoa nibs are seeds, but they are not nuts. I have not heard of people being allergic to cocoa but that doesn't mean they don't exist. Botanically, all nuts are seeds, but not all seeds are nuts.


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I do not think your problem is an emulsifier that you are missing, I think it's just basic temperature and technique 'issues'. Firstly, you will get a better result if you use a liquid chocolate syrup. It's like adding granulated sugar to an iced coffee - it will sweeten the cold liquid a bit, but most of the grains will just get wet and clump together at ...


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It's called "dutching" or "alkalinisation" The cocoa (cacao in Dutch) beans are first roasted to remove the skins. The second roast and/or alkalinisation (using potassium carbonate) of the inner cocoa nibs is then ground to form the cocoa mass (liquor). The mass is then pressed to separate into 55% cake, and 45% fat (cocoa butter) Some of the main Dutch ...


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I have made ganache with carob chips with great success after a few trial and error and the flavor is wonderful. What you need is to heat your heavy cream first and then gradually add the carob chips slowly until you get the thickness you want. Hint: you will not need as much carob chips as you would chocolate. You use less. Hope this helps! ;)



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