Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

20

The best way to open a brown hairy coconut, not a fresh green one (assuming you are right handed, I imagine that sinister people can reverse the instructions, but I've not tried it). First image the coconut is a head, everything is related to this, so the visualization is important. The three holes are the eyes and mouth of the face. They naturally form ...


14

Most fair sized Asian markets carry boxes of powdered coconut milk/cream. The shelf life on these products is generally quite good, and allow you to make just the amount (and strength) of coconut milk you want by simply adding water.


13

Even though it isn't really milk (in the dairy sense), coconut milk still naturally separates into a thick cream and thinner liquid like regular milk. As such, when working with coconut milk you should still follow the same procedures you would to make a milk-based cream sauce. The number one rule when making any creamy sauce is: DON'T LET IT BOIL! Boiling ...


13

Half and half or heavy cream is a pretty good substitute. It has similar fat/water suspension, reduces and thickens similarly, and emulsifies similarly. You lose the coconut flavor, but it cooks similarly and you keep the texture. You cannot substitute coconut cream, because it is too rich, which changes the texture of the sauce greatly, and doesn't do ...


11

Butter is about 80% milkfat, and 20% water, more or less. 3/4 stick is 6 tablespoons. You should be able to substitute six tablespoons of coconut oil one to one. It should be well within the tolerance of the recipe. If you really want to account for the water, you would do about 5 tbl of coconut oil, and 1 tbl of liquid.


10

A good-quality cleaver can be the right tool for both jobs. Make sure it's properly constructed with the metal of the blade running all the way through the handle, though, or else you risk the handle snapping and the blade going flying during a strike. For the coconut, the technique is actually to roll it along the blade to start a groove, then crack it ...


10

Butter is 83% fat, 17% water (we can ignore the milk solids in this case). Instead of 90 g butter, you can use 75 g coconut oil and 15 g more liquid (e.g. milk, or whatever the recipe specifies). There will be a slight difference in texture in the finished product, but nothing to worry about.


9

I don't know about the "low calorie" part of your question but if you take a container of coconut milk and freeze the left over portion in an ice cube tray, and store the ice cubes in a ziplock in your freezer they should last a good long while allowing you to use them in smaller portions in the future. As for "making your own at home"... first you plant a ...


9

The easiest way is to use oven. I find that 190C/375F is convenient. Before placing it in the oven you should drain the water from the coconut. Drilling the 2 of the 3 holes with a hammer + screwdriver works fine. After removing from the oven after about 15 minutes use a hammer to easily crack open the coconut. If it's not easily cracked, let rest for a ...


9

Alton Brown made coconut milk on his show Good Eats a few years ago, and he suggested using a clean tea towel and squeezing the pulp until it has given up all the liquid. Here is more on it: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/coconut-milk-and-cream-recipe/index.html


8

First, you don't specify if you mean cream of coconut, or coconut milk. I think coconut milk would be the thing to try here, as it has less fat. Second, if it works, it won't be bechamel any more. But this is a technical detail: if it is tasty to you, you should be able to use it as a substitution practically everywhere. Third, does it work? I haven't ...


7

Rule of thumb, dairy in the north and coconut in southern recipes. ie korma wouldn't have coconut Indian yogurt is made with whole milk. As with western recipes, balancing the fat for good mouth-feel is important: yogurt can be a good choice when a larger quantity of liquid is called for. Cream works great when a finishing splash smooths out flavors without ...


6

For safety reasons I wouldn't attempt cutting into a coconut with a knife. Try a saw instead. For chopping bones such as ribs I'd use a good weighted cleaver or heavy knife so you reduce the chance of the knife bouncing back. If you use the correct knife for the job and the knife is of good quality then no harm should come to either the knife or the ...


6

The separation you are getting is caused by inadequate mixing of coconut solids and curry paste. This will happen if you add coconut cream at the wrong time (or the wrong way) and you then cook it incorrectly. David Thompson is a world renowned chef and an expert on Thai cuisine. Here's my adaption of Thompson's technique: Place 5 or so tablespoons of ...


6

Empty the water from inside the coconut, as this is not the milk you want. Crack open your coconut and scrape out the meat. In a blender, take about half your meat and roughly 1 1/2 cups of hot water (more or less depending on your desired thickness), and process. Repeat step 3 with the other half of the meat. Place a few layers of cheesecloth over a bowl ...


6

Shake it gently and listen for and feel the slosh. As coconuts age the liquid level decline to zero An unripe coconut is nearly full and can hardly slosh. A good slosh sound is a generally ripe coconut (about 150 to 300 ml's of liquid). As the liquid get less and less the flesh get softer and tastier to eat raw There are many different types of coconuts, ...


6

Ok I'm going to give this a shot by helping you understand why the ingredients are in there. At it's core this seems to be a very aerated meringue with stabilizers to help avoid using dairy products and eggs. organic sweet potato, organic apple puree concentrate, organic sweet pea, organic white grape juice concentrate These ingredients are your ...


5

I've ruined a cleaver opening a coconut, before I learned the correct technique -- use the back of the knife. Hold the coconut in your off hand, and slowly work your way around the coconut, turning and hitting it with the back of your knife. The goal is to crack the coconut, not to cut it. As for bones with the chef's knife -- it won't do major harm so ...


5

Two things I know can make this difficult: using low-fat coconut milk, or using coconut milk that has had an emulsifier added to it (check the ingredients). Also, you may just not be cooking it long enough or at high enough of a temperature. I think you will really like the results when you get this to work, the curry comes out less gelatinous and more ...


5

For mouth-feel minus the calories, I make a puree of sauteed onions. It is an old restaurant trick. The onions can be browned or not as preferred but completely soft before blending a minute or more. Freezes well. For flavor and a load of calories, a bit of cashew cream adds wonderful richness. Careful not to boil, though.


5

Coconut oil is a saturated fat, which makes it solid at room temperature. Above room temperature, it behaves exactly like any other oil and has a very high smoke point. You don't need to treat it in any special way. I personally just use a knife or spoon to dig a little bit out of the container. Coconut oil is considered to have a neutral flavour (with the ...


5

Properly stored, dry roasted nuts should lose none of their flavour. Keep them in a well sealed container and they will be fine. Spices, however, should be freshly toasted, because the point of doing so is to encourage them to release their flavourful oils.


5

All coconut milk separates out. When you buy it tinned, there is often a plug of coconut cream above a pocket of coconut milk. But it certainly should recombine. It may well have been too cold when you tried to stir it together - let it come to room temperature at least. If you warmed it up on the stove you'd find the two would melt together without any ...


4

Check this out: Presto 02910 SaladShooter Electric Slicer/Shredder I haven't used it personally, but two of the top 3 reviews mention using it for grating both potatoes and coconuts. There's also a "professional" version that's probably a bit more versatile/reliable. Considering how silly the idea sounds, it seems to have gotten some pretty rave ...


4

If it can grate a hard cheese, it can grate a coconut. I have a grating attachment on my kitchen aid that works great, but you can also use the grating disk on your food processor as justkt stated above. Or if you REALLY use a lot of coconut and want the ultimate unitasker, you can buy an electric coconut grater. ...


4

My wife loves it toasted. Toast shredded coconut in a dry pan or oven and put on ice cream and other deserts. It's really tasty. Like toasting other nuts be careful as if you blink it may burn.


4

Standard answer: No, you should not use a chef's knife for those jobs. The chef's knife should be very sharp and is used mainly for chopping vegetables or meat. Alternatives have been discussed here. A cleaver, a shears, the back of the chef's knife even.


4

For smaller bones, like chicken bones, you may find a good pair of kitchen shears an easy-to-control alternative to a cleaver. I have these Messermeister shears, which I totally love.


4

Coconut flour is what remains1 when extracting the milk from coconut. So I doubt you can make anything resembling coconut milk (much less coconut cream) from it, unless the manufacturer has done an exceptionally poor job of doing so already!


4

The brute force way is with a machete :) However, you can also do it with a small handsaw (which is useful if you want to use the shell for something - they make cool hiding places for fishes in an aquarium). Otherwise, you can split it with a wide chisel and a hammer.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible