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36

Time to apply a bit of healthy skepticism here: The blog post: Is (so far) the first and only one I've ever seen stating mold to be a practical problem in coffee - in the sense of being present in a high enough quantity to matter (mold grows everywhere). Uses all kinds of weasel words to describe symptoms ("edgy", "cranky", "useless mentally"). Describes ...


35

There's a whole, whole lot than can go into it, but a great starting place is a ratio of 17.21:1 water to coffee. That is, if you have 500 g of water, you should use 29 g of ground coffee. What the ratio really does is specify how concentrated the coffee should be. Once you've set your ratio, there are many other variables to play with to make the coffee ...


34

In my opinion, the best option is to have someone grind them for you. Ask your friends--someone may have a grinder you can borrow, or would be happy to grind them for you in exchange for some cookies or part of the bag of coffee. If you have a local coffee shop, talk to the barista (over the latte' you just bought) and ask if he/she will grind your beans ...


26

You do want a coarse grind for french press coffee. The key is letting the coffee steep for long enough to make a strong brew. I have good results with a 5 minute steep time. Be sure to use a timer, and compare different times to find the optimal brew. As a general rule, if you are at altitude, then you need to add time because boiling water is cooler. (Note ...


23

Coffee beans have a natural oil in them. Often beans that have been roasted longer will have more visible oil on the surface. Not really an indicator of quality, though, but a longer roast will be darker, have a stronger flavor, and (paradoxically to some) less caffeine. (At least, this is what I learned when slinging Cappuccinos at a Canadian coffee chain ...


23

It is traditionally served with coffee when getting together with friends for coffee; kind of like tea-cakes are served at tea-time.


21

You definitely want to keep beans whole as long as possible. Ideally, grind just the amount you need right before you brew the coffee. Keep the whole beans airtight, and freezing probably isn't necessary unless you buy a month of beans in advance.


21

It has nothing to do with the microwave and everything to do with the volatility of aromas and flavors in coffee. Even coffee kept warm for 4 hours won't taste very good. In my experience, stale brewed coffee results in a more pronounced acidity, if left out to cool, or a woody, muddy, bitter kind of flavor, sometimes with more pronounced acidity, if held ...


18

I don't know if there's an ideal ratio since this is really about how strong you want the coffee to be. It depends on the strength of the roast you're using, the grind, and how strong you like the coffee. I generally use 2 tbs / 6 oz, but vary it to taste.


18

I'd pick up a simple cone filter at the local coffee shop. Insert a paper filter, add grounds, pour hot water through.


17

Background The manual drip technique (AKA "filtercone brewing") and an automatic drip-brewer are very similar; both involve pouring water through a conical filter into a vessel. The difference is that an automatic drip-brewer maintains consistent and hopefully ideal conditions, so when you drip-brew manually, you are essentially trying to recreate the ...


15

Yes, it is different. Two things happen: the dissolved oxygen boils out, and whatever mineral solids are in there become concentrated as steam evaporates.


15

It's not going to be nice to drink a day later, no matter what. I'd use it in baking a chocolate cake or something like that instead, if you can't bear to throw it out. The problem is not just the reheating, which will further cook the coffee and affect flavour, but that it's been losing aroma and oxidizing for a day first. If you're serving it to anyone ...


15

For coffee, there is milk in 10-ml portions. It is UHT, so it doesn't start spoiling until you open it, and you only open one of them per coffee. Alternatively, use powdered milk.


15

The standard espresso drink is the double espresso (a double espresso shot). Although you can get single or triple espressos, if you are comparing quality, the double espresso is the standard. Regardless of which type of shot you order, if you are comparing quality across different cafes, you should always order the same thing (ie don't order a single at ...


14

Hot Air Popper The cheapest and simplest is to use a (cheap) electric hot air popper. The old favorite is the West Bend Poppery, but you can use anything as long as the vent holes (where the hot air comes in) are on the sides rather than the bottom. I've roasted a lot of coffee this way. It works, but there are a few downsides. The biggest problems: The ...


14

Crema is a food foam. For crema to form and survive long enough for us to enjoy the espresso, something needs to hold the bubbles of the foam together. In most food foams proteins help hold up the bubbles, but in crema it is a mixture of proteins and oils. This makes it hard to predict what makes good crema. From practice, good crema comes from: Enough ...


14

In a Good eats episode from the 13th season (The Ballad of Salty and Sweet), Alton Brown explains how salt (specifically the sodium) blocks your tongue's taste buds from sensing bitterness. Sweetness however is not blocked. It also is known to enhance other flavours. Salt on chocolate is awesome for example. Salt also has the ability to still taste salty ...


14

My university has access to the study @w00t linked in a comment here, so I thought I'll provide a summary of their findings. Do green coffee beans contain aflatoxins? They found that yes, coffee beans naturally grow molds which produce aflatoxins. Molds and toxins were isolated from 17 out of 30 samples of green coffee beans they purchased from local ...


13

You could use a drill and soup can. http://lifehacker.com/5494207/roast-coffee-with-a-drill-and-a-soup-can Other life hacker tips for roasting coffee at home on the cheap http://lifehacker.com/226925/diy-coffee-roasting http://lifehacker.com/365235/roll-your-own-coffee-roaster-on+the+cheap


13

a Keurig or other single-cup coffee maker might be a good idea, everyone could have their own favorites. The coffee isn't amazing but it's surprisingly decent.


13

It IS the roast that is the difference. The only real difference in the beans is that some beans taste better at a higher roast than others, so they are more appropriate for espresso. Your Italian grocery coffee company may be using the espresso label for marketing purposes, but in general, espresso coffee beans can be the same beans that are used for ...


13

Milk is mostly water. Instant coffee will dissolve just fine in milk or even cream. Of course, flavour-wise it's going to be more like a weak latte than coffee. That's essentially what a latte is - coffee and milk.


13

The equivalent of coffee beans would be loose leaf teas. This is the traditional way to enjoy tea, and is generally preferred by tea connoisseurs. Just like whole-bean coffee, loose leaf tea keep fresh longer than bagged tea, and generally has a richer flavor. Tea bags are generally prepared by the cut-tear-curl (CTC) process, which breaks up the leaves ...


13

If you're drinking the espresso shot on its own, you could drink it straight from the shot glass - or, better yet, buy an espresso cup, which should be about the same height as your shot glass. (A double-walled espresso cup will help keep it warm.) If you're pulling espresso shots to be used in other espresso-based drinks (i.e., if you're adding some sort ...


13

Plain white vinegar is the normal way to remove coffee tastes and stains. Hot vinegar works better


12

If you use your whole beans within a week it's probably not worth storing it in the refrigerator or freezer. Coffee beans should be stored in a cool, dry place. They can last 1-3 weeks in your pantry. Ideally you should store them in an airtight opaque container. They degrade quickly in the presence of light, heat, or oxygen. If you want to store them ...


12

I alone on the planet seem to have solved the endless problem of cleaning the fine holes of an espresso portafilter, or a Moka express fine steam filter. None of the liquid or abrasive cleaning apps work, period. Instead, in the past, one had to use a pin to poke out the minute holes — task so laborious and hopeless than most espresso and Moka machines in ...


12

I believe that the following study provides a definitive answer: Application of high performance liquid chromatography to the analysis of some non-volatile coffee components From the abstract: High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was applied to the analysis of caffeine, trigonelline, nicotinic acid and sucrose in Arabica and Robusta coffee. ...



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