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Middle column - near the bottom of the page. Identified as Cafe Brulot. Hope this is what you were looking for. http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=888&dat=19380206&id=nx9PAAAAIBAJ&sjid=Wk0DAAAAIBAJ&pg=3267,872400


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A quick internet search "Café Brulot" returns a number of recipes. There is even a scan of"Good Taste Today" by Emily Post in the St. Petersburg Times Feb 6 1938) that describes the Café Brulot (not a recipe). http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=nx9PAAAAIBAJ&sjid=Wk0DAAAAIBAJ&pg=3267%2C872400


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In my experience, you're going to get a lot of degradation with pre-ground coffee regardless of the steps you take to protect it. As mentioned in other posts (ex: What is the best way to store ground coffee?) you're looking to do the following: Prevent the coffee as much as possible from contact with air. Avoid moisture absorption (from air). Avoid ...


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Turkish coffee refers to the method of making coffee, not a type of coffee. Also known as mocha or kahve, it is traditionally made in an ibik using cold water to prolong the time the coffee "brews" and releases flavour. The ibik (aka cezve in Arabic) was invented in the 16th century, replacing the previous method of steeping the coffee in hot water set in ...


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It is NOT necessary to store coffee in the freezer. It can be helpful if you want to store it for long periods - i.e. months. Ground coffee should NOT be thawed and re-frozen, nor opened frequently and put-back in the freezer. Think of your freezer as long-term storage, and take out a week's worth of coffee at a time. Also, it's not going to make a ...


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I've had this discussion on more than one occasion with my mother. All else being equal, our experience has been to get a coffee maker optimal to the size of pots you will be brewing. By getting a maker too large, the grounds will not receive the hot water in the rate or pattern that is intended for that size. Having a basket of grounds filled only ...


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Not research, but here's my personal experience. I cold brew my coffee with just normal mason jars (not Toddy), the general suggested steep time is 12 hours. You can increase it to up to 24 hours depending on the strength you like your cup of coffee. 1 or 2 hours would be too short to extract the full body of flavors in my opinion if you were using the ...


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Yes, unfortunately, I have not encountered a grinder that can grind the coffee beans fine enough for Turkish coffee. It is perhaps more accurate to call it "to pound" instead of "to grind" when it comes to Turkish coffee. I think the best device for it is a mortar, a hand mill could als work.



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