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14

Blue potatoes dry enough? Those could certainly fit with breakfast. (hash browns, home fries, etc) Blue corn may also work in a corn pancake.


13

Short answer: store mayonnaise has less yolks per volume oil, and yolks give most of the yellow color. Mainly the reason is that store mayonnaise adds water, rather than relying on the moisture in the egg yolks and vinegar. To quote On Food and Cooking, page 634: Though cookbooks often say that the ratio of oil to egg yolk is critical, that one ...


13

As the USDA says, the protein myoglobin is the main cause of the red color of meat; it achieves this color when exposed to oxygen. Red meat (or dark meat) is myoglobin-rich, from "slow-twitch" endurance muscles, while white meat has little myoglobin, and is from "fast-twitch" muscles. So it really is the protein in the meat, as you guessed! But we can ...


12

Gravy is supposed to be opaque and is a result of using flour as the thickener. If you want clear gravy, like what you would get in a Chinese restaurant, then you need to use corn starch or arrowroot as your thickener. But the opacity is considered to be a good thing. It's the canned stuff you buy in the store that is clear.


11

Hojicha is a green tea which is made from bancha, a low grade green tea, and cooked slightly; this very inexpensive green tea often comes out brown because it is discolored by oxidation. Other than this variety, and some very stale bancha, I can't think of a Japanese green tea that comes out brown. Some stale kukicha might come out brown, and low quality ...


10

Squid ink is used to make black pasta, no reason it wouldn't work with butter. Good fishmongers should be able to source it for you.


9

As The Color of Meat and Poultry article from the USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service explains: Myoglobin, a protein, is responsible for the majority of the red color. When it is mixed with oxygen, it becomes oxymyoglobin and produces a bright red color. The remaining color comes from the hemoglobin which occurs mainly in the circulating blood, ...


8

Regarding the last question: Do egg producers and/or chefs use dirty tricks to effect a yellow yolk? Dye? Food additives? Yes, they do! In fact scientists have experimented with food additives in order to control the color of the yolk. Interestingly enough the preferred color of the egg yolk differ between countries and even between regions within ...


7

The color of the yolk is based on the chicken's diet. I eat vegetarian fed eggs from the grocery store and they have deep yellow yolks. If I go back to buying standard white eggs its a bit disconcerting because they have very pale yolks. In the fall is when the eggs are the orangest for pasture raised eggs, again something about what is available to feed. ...


7

It could be from some kind of seasoning such as paprika. It depends on the dish really.


7

This should depend greatly on what the item is. Hamburgers generally run clear, possibly slightly bloody if undercooked. The only example of this I can think of would be the odd orange drippings from "taco meat". The cause of that is soluble coloring agents or spices in the drippings.


7

I think that this must be some freakish ocuurence. The way you describe it, there isn't anything you did wrong, unless maybe if you have been throwing in spices by the handful. Tomatoes (incl. skins) don't contain anything thickening. In fact, when you want to thicken a tomato puree, you are in for hours of constant stirring over gentle heat until most of ...


7

Small amounts of natural fruit or vegetable juices should provide some colour without altering the flavour too much. If you have access to a juicer, carrot, beet, strawberry and blueberry all come to mind as colouring agents.


6

wooden toothpicks with colored ends, like the kind at cocktail parties? (like these? http://tinyurl.com/3pjf4kx)


6

For cooking in with the pasta, consider red or yellow bell peppers, carrots, cauliflower or other vegetables that hold their color well when heated. Also, you can help this problem a lot with good, flavorful, beautiful garnishes. Even a simple shower of minced parsley goes a long way. Lemon or orange zest is nice too. Check out this peppery red-wine ...


6

Yep I agree with Stefan I'd get a can of edible spray paint!! (no affiliation)


5

If you are making your own marshmallows, you can add home made or purchased natural food color. With home made colors there is a trade-off: too much coloring liquid and you get the added flavor, too little, and the colors will be whitish. You make your own by concentrating the juices of blueberries, raspberries, spinach, or carrots, or by using turmeric. ...


5

I would take 3 parts elderberry, 1 part water and heat it to boiling with a small amount of agar. Once cold you have blue to darkblue, slightly purple jelly. If you take a bit more agar it gets solid enough to be cut. It would still look like a liquid. It is not really sweet, so it would go well with your breakfast dish.


5

If you just want to change the color - just some black food coloring should be fine. If you can't find it in a store locally, you can always see if a bakery that does cakes will give you just a tiny bit or if they'll blend a few colors to make a dark gray.


5

According to this blog, you can make blue dye from red cabbage, water, and baking soda. I don't know if it would specifically work on scallops, but I haven't been able to find any proof that alkaline dyes are detrimental to them. The article points out that they work for pastries, though. Spinach or matcha (green tea powder) could work for green dye. ...


5

It's the kind of tea you are using. Japanese green teas are mostly steamed, where Chinese teas are roasted, in order to stop the leaves from breaking down. When the leaves are steamed, as in Sencha or Matcha, they produce a very green leaf, and in turn, a green brew. If a restaurant serves you a really green colored tea, its most likely a powdered sencha ...


5

Texture. Although I can see perfectly, I use texture to tell me if pasta is done, for example. It's obvious for spaghetti but I do it for macaroni too, or any shapes. Just stirring a pot full of boiling water with raw macaroni, then stirring a pot full of boiling water and cooked macaroni, is a very different experience. Stir frying raw meat, partly cooked ...


5

This is another case for anthocyanins, the same compound that causes garlic and ginger to turn blue. Anthocyanins are pH sensitive, only appearing blue or purple when in the presence of acidity. As you cook the beans, the cells begin to rupture and lose water, which causes the acid around the anthocyanins to be diluted. As this happens, they lose their color ...


5

The story is more complicated than SAJ tells it. Blueberries, like many other purple foods, are colored by a pigment called anthocyanin. It changes its color from red at very low pH to real blue at very high pH. At the blueberry's natural pH, the color is a purple with more red than blue in it. What you can do is to juice some blueberries separately, then ...


5

Anthocyanins are antioxidants that are a very common water based pigment in plants. There are over 500 varieties that have been isolated from plants which are are responsible for many blue, red, and purple pigments in flowers and fruit. It is thought that the colors serve to attract pollinators to flowers and camouflage leaves from herbivores. They are the ...


4

One of the first things I learned in Indian cooking is that the combination of tomatoes, onions and ginger is self-thickening. As time went by, I realised that the thickening effect is far more noticable with old varieties of tomatoes - "beef" tomatoes and a lot of the modern varieties are difficult to thicken unless partially fried first. Despite the ...


4

I have seen the same phenomena with cooked hamburgers and steaks. My research led me back to part of your question having to do with duck meat being characterized as red meat. What differentiates red meat from white meat is the amount of myoglobin in the meat which absorbs oxygen from the air. All red meat, when exposed to air, will turn bright red. I ...


4

I would think the main factor in the colouration, assuming you use the same amount of ketchup each time, is the colour of the egg yolks. There is a specified range of yolk colours, specified on a yolk colour fan (PDF). The colour varies depending on the amount of caretonoids in the feed the chickens have eaten. Most chicken farms will supplement the feed ...


3

The reddish-orange color is almost certainly paprika or another ground chili. This imparts its fiery color to the juice and the oil used in cooking. Oh, and also to any softer plastic you may leave it in, such as tupperware containers.


3

All the blue(ish) food I can recall: A lot of candies Grapes The outside of passion fruit (you can replicate waves) Blueberries Elderberries Ice cream Blue potatoes Red cabbage (I've read that it would turn blue if you don't add apples/acid) Violets Blue yoghurt Eggplant (maybe) However, I'm not sure what of these would fit with breakfast. I think the ...



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