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13

You will have to find a way to separate the batches of ice cream, or you'll end up with the uniform purple, as you mentioned. The proper way is to prepare three batches, using different food coloring in two of them. They should come out of the machine with a soft-serve consistency. Hold the first batches in a cool environment while preparing the last ones, ...


12

How yellow were you expecting it? How much saffron did your recipe call for? Generally, when a recipe calls for a "pinch" of saffron that can be anywhere from 15-20 stems (expensive, I know). Saffron can take time to impart it's yellow coloring, and the depth of that yellow can vary based on the quality, age, or phase of the moon (not really). Some things ...


11

Hojicha is a green tea which is made from bancha, a low grade green tea, and cooked slightly; this very inexpensive green tea often comes out brown because it is discolored by oxidation. Other than this variety, and some very stale bancha, I can't think of a Japanese green tea that comes out brown. Some stale kukicha might come out brown, and low quality ...


11

If you make homemade strawberry ice cream, the color is likely to be very, very pale, approaching white. Green food coloring in your mix should do the trick. It would be very difficult to retroactively turn commercial ice cream a different color. The pink is almost certainly from food coloring, and mixing in another coloring would be very difficult ...


10

Squid ink is used to make black pasta, no reason it wouldn't work with butter. Good fishmongers should be able to source it for you.


10

It could be from some kind of seasoning such as paprika. It depends on the dish really.


9

This should depend greatly on what the item is. Hamburgers generally run clear, possibly slightly bloody if undercooked. The only example of this I can think of would be the odd orange drippings from "taco meat". The cause of that is soluble coloring agents or spices in the drippings.


8

As a note I'm answering this question based on avoiding artificial food dyes (Red #40, Yellow #5, etc) rather than all food coloring. Raspberry puree will produce a pink result, and I have sucessfully done a very dark pink with ground freeze dried raspberries. Achieving the depth of color needed to provide a true red or blue would require not only ...


8

In a literal sense, rumtscho and SAJ14SAJ are right. However, if you're willing to be a little adventurous, then you can do this! and without an ice cream machine. And it'll be a fun party trick, to boot. First, buy strawberry ice cream with real strawberries that isn't fully pink (like Haagen Dazs). Second, use pistachio colouring/paste, it's full ...


7

Why do you need to thicken the shells? Some bird's eggs have thicker walls than others, and it also seems that younger hens form thicker shells than older ones. However, it is doubtful that a thicker eggshell is available commercially. Your best bet may be to poke holes in the eggs, let them drain and dry, and then paint them with a strengthening varnish. A ...


6

There are things you can do to tweak the colors, but generally it's easy to move towards brown and dark, and hard to move towards a pure shade and light. You can use food coloring, spices with a lot of color (like turmeric). You can lighten with cornstarch, flour, and dairy. (thanks satanicpuppy) If presentation is important to you, you can buy ingredients ...


6

It's difficult to find reliable information amidst all the marketing hype with xylitol, but here's what I've been able to figure out: Xylitol does have fewer calories, per unit of weight, than table sugar. However, xylitol is also less sweet than sugar. Factually, it has about 2/3 the calories of sugar. Anecdotally, it is about half as sweet, so if you ...


5

If you just want to change the color - just some black food coloring should be fine. If you can't find it in a store locally, you can always see if a bakery that does cakes will give you just a tiny bit or if they'll blend a few colors to make a dark gray.


5

It's the kind of tea you are using. Japanese green teas are mostly steamed, where Chinese teas are roasted, in order to stop the leaves from breaking down. When the leaves are steamed, as in Sencha or Matcha, they produce a very green leaf, and in turn, a green brew. If a restaurant serves you a really green colored tea, its most likely a powdered sencha ...


5

I would suggest instead of trying to mix the actual ice cream into their designated colors, you could use blueberry and strawberry syrup drizzled on top of the vanilla ice cream. Or you could use fresh as well.


5

There are special kinds of food colouring for icings, such as those sold by Wilton. As a rule, you should use these, not traditional food colouring. You can use ordinary food colouring but it will be hard to get the colours you want, and your icing will end up being watery/runny. The icing colours (AKA gel icings) preserve the texture of your icing and, ...


5

Anything that's hard to get off of your counter can make a good food coloring. Regarding natural sources, remember that you run the risk of also adding additional flavors so take that into consideration. Among other companies, Annie's makes all natural foods including colorful fruit snacks. What they use for the coloring in these snacks are: turmeric, black ...


4

Yes, the principles are the same as for paint. It is subtractive color, meaning each new color you use subtracts out all of the colors except the ones it reflects. The other kind is additive color, when you are mixing lights like on a stage or out of a television set, and doesn't have much application to food that I can think of.


4

The reddish-orange color is almost certainly paprika or another ground chili. This imparts its fiery color to the juice and the oil used in cooking. Oh, and also to any softer plastic you may leave it in, such as tupperware containers.


4

No, this is not possible for several reasons. First, you cannot color already-made ice-cream. It is made from frozen crystals of cream, and it is too hard frozen to be mixed with stuff. If you were to drizzle food coloring on it, you'd only get a few dots, but they will not spread through the whole thing. Colored ice cream is made by dissolving food ...


3

Although Aaronut is entirely right in stating that you would be better off using alternate colourings that do not damage the texture of your icing, you can use normal food colourings, I do quite often. When I use them on fondant or marzipan, the main issue is the capacity of the icing to absorb the colouring. They have limited ability to tolerate the ...


3

I think that for casual home use, mixing your own blue and red is a perfectly fine idea. I've done it for making playdough and it is just fine. You could experiment with a few drops in water to determine the blue-to-red ratio, but unless you need a really specific color (Minnesota Vikings Purple or somesuch), just using equal amounts is fine.


3

You might be able to get that color with a blueberry juice or maybe beets, but purple food coloring would be easiest.


3

Ooh yes, the thick brown ooze on a plate syndrome - been there a few times... :) Well, another possibility is to not try and fix the color directly, but rather use a garnish to bring some other colors in to play. There are a lot of really great dishes that if placed in front of you without garnish would look pretty dismal. Take for example, Chicken ...


3

If you use the same Dr. Oetker colouring that I have used in the past, which is advertised as a 'gel' colouring, then you have to use a lot to get a good intense colour. You may have better results (colour and taste-wise) getting proper concentrated gel food colourings, like those made by Wilton. You need to use much less than cheaper brands so you don't ...


2

What hobodave said, plus one more tip: you can toast the saffron briefly. Wrap it in a tiny tin foil packet and put it in a skillet on a very low flame for say 5 minutes. Then proceed to soak in boiling water.


2

Everything Tim Gilbert said, plus dairy. Obviously with an acidic mixture like you're describing, cream is not the best option, but for many other dishes you can lighten the color (and often improve the taste) with the addition of some cream/sour cream/yoghurt/milk. (Yoghurt tastes good, but don't add it to a hot (high temperature, not spicy) sauce, or it ...


2

It's a pigment, so the principles are the same, but there's a few caveats when you're dealing with icing (and other than making fake blood, or dying cookie dough to make pie chart looking cookies, it's the only time I've ever died food for no other reason than to be decorative) Liquid colors will throw off the consistency of icing if used in any large ...


2

School art and craft supply outlets sell colourings safe for children's consumption in liquid and powder forms Powder based colour works fine in many bakery products



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