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-1

You could simply use Agar instead of gelatine... The disadvantage of Agar however is that it doesn't liquefy as easily as gelatine, but the advantage is that it's suitable for a vegan diet.


3

There are two things you can do to make the mousse stiffer: Reduce the water from the fruit. So use some kind of concentrate instead of the pure fruit. For example, you could cook down a syrup or jam and add it to the mousse. Or see if dehydrating juice gets you somewhere. Use more fat. Instead of whipping cream at 30 to 35% fat, you could use ...


2

However much you are making, use this ratio: 4 parts heavy cream/whipping cream to 2 parts sweetened condensed milk to 2 parts passionfruit pulp. Make sure that before you start, you whip the heavy cream until it holds in stiff peaks. This results in a mousse that has an almost custard-like consistency, but with a lighter feel. I don't know how to make a ...


0

It is always somewhat soft when it is in the pot. You have to let it set. After 12 hours or so, the usual pudding can hold its own shape. That is, it won't flow if you angle the bowl, and you can invert a mold of it and it will keep. That being said, this is just a tradition. You can certainly make it wetter, like porridge or some polentas, and enjoy it ...


2

It sounds to me like you are making your pudding almost as thick as it should be. It should be able to stand up a little. In other words, if you spoon some into a desert cup or small bowl, it should make a pile. It shouldn't be solid like ice cream, it should be smooth, but still stay in a pile shape. Do you have custard where you live? It should be ...



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