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29

I like my chocolate chip cookies chewy too and I do it all the time. Here is what I do: Flour: I use a higher gluten flour instead of AP, such as Bread flour. Eggs: An additional egg yolk will help Sugar: A bigger Brown Sugar to Sugar ratio helps but not vital if you do not have brown sugar at hand. Butter: Butter should be melted. I think this is the key ...


26

Creaming puts the air bubbles into the mixture. The baking powder only helps enlarge the bubbles, not make them. In cookies the creaming plays another essential role, which is to help dissolve the sugar. To cream the butter keep it cool and do it for a few minutes (at 65°F, harder in the summer). It has recently been discovered that cookie dough is ...


22

Yes, the original recipes involved an enormous amount of trial and error. People baked, swapped recipes, and the good ones were desirable and became widespread, while the bad ones died out. The advanced knowledge of food chemistry wasn't even available at the time - Hannah Glasse published her cookbook more then 100 years before Mendeleev published the ...


21

You can reuse parchment paper several times for your cookies (it also works for other dry dishes), depending on cooking time and temperature, with no problem. Change the paper when it gets dirty, dark and/or brittle as it may crumble beyond this point. I always do so with no difference in the results, saving both on money and waste.


18

Gnocchi shaped? I am pretty sure they are Turdilli! . It's a traditional Calabrian recipe: They are deep-fried: And hot-soaked in honey too: Same biscotti, slightly different shapes: Bear in mind that fried cookies soaked in honey are a traditional treat for carnival and Christmas seasons all over Italy, so you may find many, many ...


18

Peanut butter cookies don't spread as they cook, so you have to flatten them before hand. This ensures that the middle will cook through before the outside burns. As for the pattern created, it actually creates slightly more surface area, so you'll get more browning at the extra edges that you create. Think of it like a meringue, or the top of a shepherd's ...


16

Cookies really only spread out because of their fat content: when it gets warm it flows, and if it flows too much before the glutens start binding to give it structure, you get flat cookie. So, in this case, if the dough is colder at the start the fat stays stable longer, and lets the cookie set up. You can try experimenting with your fats: maybe butter ...


15

First of all, lye is not "water boiled with ash". You might be thinking of potash, which used to be used as lye, but virtually all food-grade lye today is sodium hydroxide. In terms of its function, it largely raises the alkalinity (pH). Baking soda does too, but sodium hydroxide is far more potent - let's just say you don't want to get any on your hands ...


14

Alkaline solutions are used in different qualities in doughs. I am afraid that you mix something up here, so I don't know which you mean. One use is to enhance the Maillard reaction, which Aaronut already described. This is indeed done with lye. But nobody is incorporating lye into the dough (this would be quite dangerous). Instead, the formed pieces are ...


14

The fat in your dough started to soften/melt - especially if you have a hot oven running in the kitchen. Keep your dough cold in the fridge between batches. See this question for more details on the issue in general, but for your situation, keep it cold between batches. You seem to have started correctly, which is good - you just have to keep it going ...


13

This is the recipe for chocolate chip cookies For more details check out the Jan/Feb 96 edition of Cooks Illustrated. 2 c. all-purpose flour plus two tablespoons more ½ t baking soda ½ t salt 1½ sticks Butter (melted and this is key! also this is a bit less than typical) ½ c granulated sugar 1 c ...


13

You're going to have more issues with cookie-spreading than anything else, because your fat is going to get all warm. If you have a lot of fat in your cookies, you're definitely going to want to put the dough back in the fridge. If the dough is a hard dough, and you don't expect your cookies to significantly change shape during cooking, I wouldn't worry ...


13

The rest period hydrates the starches in flour, giving the dough a firmer and more workable texture (there is some very minor gluten development, but its mostly the expansion of the starch bundles with water). In many cookies, the flavors will also mature and improve, especially with cocoa in the recipe. In many recipes, the cooling from refrigeration is ...


12

There's a replacement, but it's not an ingredient most people have sitting around -- flax seed. I use it when I'm cooking for a few of my friends who are vegans. Grind up some flax seed in a coffee grinder. For each egg, take 1 TB of flax seed meal, and 3 TB of water. Stir it up and let it sit for a while -- it'll get kinda slimy. Use that in place of ...


12

Alton Brown dicusses how to change cookie recipes in the Good Eats episode "Three Chips For Sister Marsha" (S3E6P1) The transcript can be found here: http://www.goodeatsfanpage.com/Season3/Cookie/CookieTranscript.htm From scene 14, we learn that If you: add soda replace 1 egg with milk high ratio white:brown sugar use butter You get: Thin & Crisp ...


11

One thing to keep in mind is that they are in the "Contains 2% or less" section, which means they are exempt from the "descending order requirement". So all we know is that they are less that 2% of the total weight. I just looked at one typical chocolate chip cookie recipe that gave weights in grams, and it was 8% eggs by weight (114 grams out of 1419). So ...


10

There's a lot of things that can throw off baking recipes -- Regional variations in flour hardness. 'All purpose' flour from the US South tends to be softer than brands from other areas. The humidity and temperature. Altitude (affects the boiling point of water, which will require adjusting baking times and possibly leavening agents) How you measure your ...


10

The only way that the butter could be incorporated without creaming would be to melt it. Melting butter, or allowing it to get too soft, even if just left at room temperature too long will result in what I call "pancake cookies"...those that just spread out and run all over the baking sheet. This is also the reason that butter should NEVER be softened in ...


10

From looking at that recipe, those cookies look like they are designed to not spread out. Why do I say that? There is a lot of structure in the beginning - the egg whites and butter are beaten together with the sugar and honey for a strong structure made by a hybrid of the creaming method (beating butter with sugar) and the foaming method (beating eggs ...


9

Actually, you can do very well with melted butter if you are willing to refrigerate the dough for an hour or so afterwards. The reason you get pancake cookies is that the gluten doesn't have time to set in the oven before the liquid butter runs. If you firm it back up, it works beautifully. Here is an Alton Brown recipe that exemplifies the technique.


9

It may be because of the type of yeast being used. Quick-cooking bread machines (1 hour cycle) typically requires "instant" yeast which rises much faster. Standard-cooking bread machines (2-3 hour cycle) need regular yeast, which is active longer. It sounds like you're using instant yeast in a standard recipe; thus the yeast stops working before the bread ...


9

The mixture should lighten in both color and texture, and it should be 'fluffy'. It should also increase in volume. The point of creaming is to incorporate the sugar with the fat, while at the same time adding air to the mixture. The air bubbles introduced during creaming expand during cooking, making the cookies rise and giving a lighter texture. Cookies ...


9

Baking soda also raises the PH of the product resulting in better browning. Soda can be left out. Many recipes- especially for chewier cookies- don't call for any leavening besides the eggs. http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/the-chewy-recipe/index.html Cookie recipes often call for the dough to be chilled so that it spreads less in the oven ...


8

Can I make cookies on a pizza stone? Unless I'm misreading, you answered this yourself with your first sentence. Will all my cookies taste like pizza? Will my pizza taste like cookies? Unless you're spilling pizza toppings onto the stone, no. Brushing it clean in between each usage will take care of any flavor transfer.


8

As I understand your question, the problem is really that you can't get it out of the cookie press, and not an issue of the dough "flattening" once it hits the baking sheet. If that's correct, then there are a few different factors that could be contributing: You might not be using a strong enough flour. I've always used a 1:1 mix of bread flour and ...


8

There are a few things I can think of. The first is, are you sure your oven is at the right temperature? Although your oven may beep that it's preheated, without checking it with an oven or infrared thermometer you can't be sure that it's actually at the temperature you need - and even if it is at that temperature where the sensor is, it might not be the ...


8

Another reason for strong alkalis in cooking is to quickly breaks down the flour gluten, instead of having the dough sit around for a long time to 'soften' it This is used in hand pulled noodles and in cookie dough that is extruded or piped Common bottled cooking Lye water in supermarkets is mostly potassium carbonate and some sodium biphosphate. In powder ...


8

Assuming you aren't very unlucky and happen to download a series of bad recipes I think it's one of a few things. It's possible you could be undercooking your goods. Fully cooked baked goods should not taste like flour. It's also possible that you could be mixing insufficiently. If this were the case though you'd likely have some cookies that weren't ...


8

Well, looking at the recipe... The sugar (brown sugar + honey) level looks roughly appropriate compared to the flour so that's unlikely. The fat level looks a tad low for the cookies I normally do, but I've never used oil in cookies before. You might try increasing the oil just a bit to lend extra tenderness, but I don't think this is the real issue. ...


8

There are many factors in play such as the type of sugars, amount of eggs or other sources of hydration, amount and type of leavening and so forth, but as an overall generalization: Melting the butter will lead to chewier cookies Creaming colder/room temperature butter with sugar will lead to cookies with a higher, more cake like texture. Refrigerating the ...



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