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Granulated sugar is 100% sucrose with the molasses removed. Raw sugar on the other hand is refined sucrose with its natural molasses. The answer is yes, you can use them but you might need a bit of tweaking within the recipe. If your raw sugar looks a bit more like brown sugar then your chocolate chip cookies would come out more chewy (not that its a bad ...


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An alternative to a wire rack is to simply turn them upside down. The bottoms need exposure to the air to cool and dry - against a plate (or the pan) they sweat leftover moisture from the baking, which a cooling rack is supposed to prevent. However, the important bit seems to be cooling the undersides - so if you don't have a rack, even just flipping them ...


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Have you considered sprinkling a tiny bit of sea salt on top of the cookies prior to baking? The NYTimes recipe for Chocolate Chip Cookies with sea salt is very popular: http://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1015819-chocolate-chip-cookies You could also try sprinkling a blend of cinnamon sugar to create a snickerdoodle flavor. You could also "spice" up your ...


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Most drop cookies that are made by creaming butter and sugar turn out fairly well as bar cookies. One thing to think about is the additional baking time - since they are thicker, you may have an underdone center even once the top is golden brown. You should probably bake them slightly longer than you would normally, and check them fairly frequently. I ...


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Either way is acceptable these days, but the classic version declines any browning. It's really a matter of personal taste. The classic Scottish recipe calls for shortbread to be set but pale. However, many people prefer a bit of light browning, as this tends to emphasize the taste of the salt, which in turn enhances the taste of the butter.


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The hoighty-toighty pastry chef answer would be of course not. Any practical cook's answer is of course. It will be a bit different, which is why the pastry chef rejects it - everything must always be perfect and waste/cost are irrelevant. It won't be a waste of ingredients, which is why practical cooks accept it. You should probably add the sugars to ...


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Besides these cookies potentially being undercooked, I've found that some cookies just come out this way, and need to cool completely before being eaten. Cooling allows for the center to solidify a bit more, giving them a gooey texture, with a crisp crust around the edges.


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If the edges burn and the center is undone, it means the heat didn't have enough time to reach the relatively cool center before the edge was too hot. The temperature gradient depends on the amount of heat from your oven and the size of your cookie - and to some degree on the thermal properties of your cookie sheet. You have mentioned the two "usual ...



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