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0

I don't know about "tools" but I think you're using the wrong paper. I love parchment paper for some things but this is not an optimal use of it. You should be using plastic wrap, which is much more similar to the plastic used to hold the tubes of dough. Parchment paper is too rigid to shape the ends of the log without odd creases. Plastic wrap is strong ...


2

It really seems to be dependent on the consistency of the dough. Some cookie doughs won't hold shape, as they contain lots of butter and very little flour - chocolate chip cookies are a good example. The upside is that you won't need to shape them into round slices before you bake them, because once in the oven, they'll melt into one big more-or-less round ...


3

No, it will not. Butter which has melted once will never again be the same after it resolidifies, so recipes assume you use butter which has never been melted. Also, when you try to warm up cold butter or also cool down warm butter quickly, the result seldom do well in baking, you get some weird behaviors like butter which smears instead of creaming well. ...


6

A sausage stuffer, perhaps? Your standard food mill attachment type more typically seen in a home kitchen: Unless you're seeing some product I've never met, I would not call that stuff "rolled in tubes" - I'd call it a tube (or log) of dough, and I expect the filling process is VERY like a (large, automated) sausage stuffer, and involves no rolling at ...


0

I've been baking bread for awhile now and have been all through the problems, and dealt with them all. A couple of tips; Use Wessex Flour, it's the best you'll find and there all good for bread machines, not all flours are. Always keep your Yeast in the fridge and don't keep it too long. Hope this helps Michael


9

Not in the same sense as in bread, no. First, in bread, there is one main ratio: liquid to flour. You can conveniently express any "additions" such as fat etc. as a percentage of the flour too, but they are additions, as in principle, you can make bread with water+flour only. The effects of these ingredients exhibit much less interaction than cookie ...


0

The reason is because red wheat lacks the structure, and as such so too would your cookies. This in turn would lead your cookies to spread flat, and since it's so thin, become hard. If you want to bake with milled hard red wheat, I would suggest mixing it with another flour that can structurally support your cookie. For example, wholemeal or plain flour.


1

I have a friend who's fatally allergic to nuts (along with many other things), but she loves making chocolate chip cookies (and eats them). There must be a specific brand of chocolate chips that are nut-free, but it is good to watch out for that as well on the labels. I echo all the advice here from everyone else: ask your friend which exact ingredients he ...


7

Step 1 should always be to ask which ingredients exactly you need to stay clear of, just in case it's more than nuts. My - possibly naïve - assumption would be that basic recipes that stick to flour, sugar, eggs, butter and possibly dairy should probably be ok. Chocolate could be dangerous as the factories often use nuts as well, so there is a risk of ...



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