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Maybe you should add 1/4 APF and change the quantity of butter into 1/2. anyway, take note of the type of cookie you really want to achieve bc there's a lot of cookie dough variations. however, if you want a good and amazing cookies, i much prefer books than recipes on net. :) hope this will help you.


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Do not overmix dough and you will get nice cookies :)


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You should let the dough get to room temperature (IMO, no more than 20c) And the dough contains enough fat that you should not need extra flour for the rolling pins. This video shows how to make pillsbury cookies : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RzyD_0ySatE


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I've found a cookie jar buying guide on Walmart.com that has some interesting tidbits. For functionality alone, looks like a glass jar should do the job well. Something like this would have an advantageous shape to make cookies easier to reach, and the jar less prone to falling. One feature you may want to look for specifically would be an hermetic ...


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Parchment paper typically lists a maximum temperature of 400°F. If you start getting above that temperature (450-475°F), you'll start to see browning around the edges and it's crumbly after coming out of the oven. Parchment that's close to the food is generally safe, because the moist dough itself can't get above boiling. In the cases where you have ...


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The short answer is yes. Parchment cannot be used as muffin/cupcake paper, (this actually goes without saying). Parchment paper can be used for virtually anything, unless it is extremely oily and/or in a near liquid state. Good luck.


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Do use beater to beat the batter. It will definitely reduce the egg smell in your cake. I have been using beater for cakes and it works.


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The cooking snobs will say that butter is better, and even my fading taste buds can sometimes detect the difference. But much of the time you can make the substitute. BTW the reason for the 7/8 figure is that butter runs about 1/8 water. So you may have to use 7/8 cup of oil and 1-2 tablespoons of water. The biggest difference between solid fat and oil ...


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The main reason that you'll see recipes use a specific part of the egg is that the whites and yolks have a very different composition. The whites contain a large number of structural proteins (which is why they can be whipped into stable foams) while the yolks contain most of the fats in the egg. Fats and proteins play very different roles in baking. So, ...


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Put the bag in front of an air conditioner for a few minutes. Worked like a champ for Oreos and chips that went stale over a humid weekend in a desk drawer. This was a window unit- I arranged to blow the cold air into the bag. Was amazed with the results.


1

I did some reading and checked several recipes. First, while all pizelle irons cook thin waffles, there does appear to be a difference in thickness from one iron to another. From the recipes I looked at, the following information and suggestions were given: In order split the pizelles in half, you must split them immediately upon removal from the iron, ...


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You absolutely can. maximegir link has some great info and here is another link about common substitutions. Just make sure you don't use a one to one, 7/8 oil to 1 part butter like the link says is about right. Also, in my experience there is subtle difference and the dough wont be as thick. I say run with it!


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Mixing it with milk (or liquid in general) is probably just to remove clumps. It clumps easily, especially when things aren't perfectly airtight (probably more common in your grandmother's time), and mixing in a small amount of liquid is an easy way to make sure it all breaks up. I'm less sure about the alternating. It is pretty common to alternate wet and ...


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Lactic acid is prevalent in sour milk products. Addition of a base such as baking soda would tend to neutralize that acid. So your grandmother's thinking was probably to get ahead of the game a bit by adding the base ingredient to the fresh milk, that is, with the idea in mind that it would keep the milk from souring and from changing the flavor of the ...



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