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20

Extra-Rare: 125F (52C) Rare: 135F (57C) Medium-Rare: 145F (63C) Medium: 160F (71C) Well-Done: 170F (77C) Note: Extra-Rare and Rare are not recommended by USDA


20

One fundamental error in this question: 400 degrees is not twice as hot as 200 degrees. Temperature is a measure of the kinetic energy of the particles involved. The only scale on which you can do the kind of ratio you are imagining is Kelvins - you have to measure from absolute zero. 400 F = 477.59 K 200 F = 366.48 K so the kinetic energy of the air in ...


18

Really, this is just to even out cooking times for vegetables that don't have a surface area to volume ratio consistent with the other things you're stir-frying. If you were to shred those green beans, as is sometimes done, you could put them in at the same time as raw, julienned carrots, and they would finish at the same time. If you put them in whole, ...


17

Normal cheese melts like that. It is made of proteins, fats, and water, and these separate when they are heated. For dipping, you need processed cheese. It has additives which keep the fat, fluid and solids mixed in a smooth mass. Also, it really helps to use very slow and even heat. This is the easy option. If you want to do it "for real", without ...


16

Warning: Although I've cooked the following low-temperature chicken two or three times without a problem, I'm no longer convinced that it is safe (see this question). Nevertheless, it is advocated by a well-known and respected chef, so I won't delete this answer unless I'm able to establish to my own satisfaction that it is, in fact, unsafe. According to ...


15

I've always cooked it on top of aluminum foil, at 350°F (~175°C) for 20 minutes. Flipping it once at about the half way point. If you prefer crispier, go for 25 minutes.


15

In my experience, you'll get the best bacon if you start with a cold pan. Throwing it onto a hot pan sounds impressive (it sizzles right away), but it will also make the bacon shrink/curl up much more and faster. I cook bacon half by look, and half by sound. After you cook it a couple times you'll see (hear) what I mean - the sizzle changes significantly ...


15

Preheating is mainly needed for breads and anything that has a short cooking time (< 15 mins or so). I don't bother preheating when I'm roasting something for a longer time. If you're setting a timer, I assume this is something that will take a while to cook, so I wouldn't worry about preheating.


15

Many "things" happen in cooking a particular dish. These physical and chemical (even biological) processes require a certain optimal range of temperature (and humidity) and take a certain amount of time to be completed. For example, when you bake bread, the yeast in the dough remains alive until the temperature rises high enough to kill it. It continues to ...


15

Oil or fat is absolutely not necessary to cook rice. I suspect you may have been taught the pilaf method where the rice is first sauteed in oil or butter, and then liquid is added and the rice is fully cooked. The purpose of the pilaf method is to add depth of flavor. When making pilafs, additional herbs, spices, or aromatics (such as onions) are often ...


13

If the ice cream mix is setting up but tending to leave a buttery coating in your mouth the best thing would be to try cutting back on the cream and replacing it with whole milk or half & half. If it's a recipe that you've used in another machine with great success but it doesn't seem to in this one, it's probably a case of how long the frozen bowl is ...


13

You'll find approximately as many recipes for chili as you will chili cooks. I find that I can make a great chili by simmering it for a minimal amount of time, no more than a couple of hours, letting the hot peppers do most of the work of flavoring it. (Here's my current chili recipe. I used to take three days to make chili.) Soaking and simmering for a ...


12

Kara, you shouldn't need to adjust the cooking time at all. If the recipe says to bring to a simmer and then cook for 45 minutes, it will probably take longer to come to a simmer, but once it is there, you can leave it for 45 minutes. The best recipes (in my opinion) will give you a time as a guideline, but the real instruction will be some target like ...


12

You shouldn't cook more than a few minutes, and should cool them as quickly as possible afterwards. Ideally, you'll be blanching them, and here's how: Bring a pot of water with a pinch of salt in it to a roiling boil Dump beans in, and cook for a few minutes Check that beans are fully cooked (time will vary by variety and ripeness of beans) Strain beans, ...


10

Doing a whole chicken in a slow cooker requires a little work, lots of cook time, and comes out so tender you can cut it with a plastic spoon. Buy a "fryer" size chicken (4 to 6 lbs), wash it, rub it down with olive oil, sprinkle on some spices (something like salt, thyme & pepper, etc), pour a little flavorful liquid (beer, cooking wine, or lemon ...


10

Go get a $15 probe thermometer. There is really no point in cooking turkey or any other roast without one. The actual answer is- there is no good way without measuring the internal temperature. Any time-based approach will be a guess at best. The built in thermometer in some turkeys is a spring with some epoxy that melts a specific temperature. They are ...


10

There isn't one. The only reliable way to determine doneness of a chicken breast is to use a thermometer. If you didn't have a thermometer then you would have to cut open the breast to confirm. Outside of those the only other method is experience. e.g. knowing that it takes 5 minutes per side to cook a breast of X size, in Y pan, on Z stove, at M heat. ...


10

No. Pasta certainly can be varied by 1-2 minutes depending on the degree of bite desired (assuming the commercial, dried variety). Furthermore, height above sealevel determines air pressure and the boiling temperature of water, which further complicates things. For microwaving, a similar problem occurs with power: not all microwaves have the same effective ...


10

There is no single answer to that question: it is going to vary program by program. Some shows, like America's Test Kitchen, are going to be quite precise--at at least, they will intend to be. Other shows, not naming any names, less so. The thing is, with very very few exceptions, you should not be cooking to time anyway. The time in a recipe is just a ...


9

I set the oven to 400F, line a half sheet pan with aluminum foil, place a cooling rack inside the pan, and then put the bacon on top of the cooling rack. It takes between 20 and 30 minutes to reach the point that I like it, but you may want to stop it earlier. Also good, blend some brown sugar and pecans until the pecans are well mixed with the sugar and ...


9

Put on a cookie sheet. Use a high temp (375F+) for 10-20 minutes depending on desired crispness. For easier cleaning of the cookie sheet, line it with aluminum foil. To let the grease drain, corrugate the foil. (This is by far what I prefer.) If you do this, remember before you tear off your sheet from the roll, you'll need ~2x as much foil for the same ...


9

It's important to distinguish between the two different types of "crisping" that both happen in bread. The first is the Maillard reaction which is caused by the sugars reacting with proteins; this is facilitated by high heat and low moisture, and is what actually causes the bread to turn brown (and eventually to burn). The other is simply the evaporation ...


9

Try heating a couple table spoons of butter with some flour in a pot for a couple of minutes stirring with a wooden spoon then add enough hot milk to make the mixture smooth. Melting the grated cheese in flour prevents the oils from separating and the proteins from curdling. (edit) If you want to search for a recipe, a Béchamel sauce with grated cheese ...


9

Smaller breads are usually called rolls or sometimes buns. There are also a lot of names for specific kinds of rolls, beyond obvious things like "sourdough rolls". You can certainly take an existing recipe and just form in to more, smaller pieces, and reducing baking time. They'll look funny if you just cut it into pieces, though; you should reform them ...


8

If it doesn't contain eggs, or at least something that serves as a substitute for eggs, it's not a crepe. Crepes cook quickly because eggs need very little time/heat to set up. Like justkt said, what you've described is a tortilla. I'm not exactly sure how or why a tortilla "sets up" (if you can even use that term for a flatbread), but it's a completely ...


8

Chick peas (garbanzo beans) are amongst the slowest of pulses to soak and cook I find. It depends what is happening to them afterwards and how old they are as to the required process. If you need them in a canned state, then I would suggest a long soak, 24 hours is not unreasonable and I think at least an hour and a half cooking time. Longer soaks do ...


8

You can try to bake both at the lower temperature, and it might turn out OK, but there are a lot of variables that could cause it not to. I went into some of the effects of time and temperature in this answer. In a nutshell, you have two major processes happening when you bake dough; the first is the Maillard reaction (browning) and the second is water ...


8

What would "ideal" mean? Most items that you can roast in 2-3 hours can also be thrown in the slow cooker for 10-12 hours. It depends entirely on how the dish is prepared, how much fat/water you're using, whether or not you incorporate steam or convection, and more. Anyway, if there were such an algorithm, it would be highly inadvisable to try using it at ...


8

You probably want to just use already-cooked beans, from a can. (Hope there's a store nearby.) Then you just have to cook as long as it takes to let the flavors mingle; half an hour is plenty. If you happen to have a pressure cooker, you can cook dried beans much faster, something like 20-30 minutes. See for example this recipe - you can add back in ...


8

Some info for completeness sake: The method you have been taught is fine. The oil, lard or fat is there to prevent: Only the bottom layer was burnt only a bit. the fat at the bottom is there to allow higher temperature from the bottom to generate steam without burning the bottom layer and the oil does that. Making rice well is not easy so don't ...



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