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-2

I nearly died from food poisoning due to an undercooked chicken but fortunately got to hospital in time. After 24 hours of vomiting and other nasty fluid emissions, the nurse woke me and cheerily remarked: "Good morning. We thought we lost you last night." Here's my recipe. Roast the chicken at 250 degrees centigrade and then roast it again. If it doesn't ...


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Chris' link to Kenji Lopez-Alt's article (see Pasteurization Time section) is spot on: both temperature and time matter for food safety. However, the method you described seems to be questionable for getting well-cooked legs and thighs. At that temperature, legs and thighs will usually be chewy and bloody, although I imagine the length of time might ...


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more simply put if you bake something at 400 degrees it is gonna cook faster on the outside so it will be getting over cooked outside and under cooked inside if you cook at a lower temperature it will cook more evenly and if you bring the item your cooking (if it were meat or something cold) to room temperature before cooking it, it will cook more evenly and ...


2

As a couple of commenters already mentioned, the base of the pressure cooker gets hotter than the rest, and chicken is no homogeneous size. I would like to add that besides the size difference between pieces of chicken, there is also a difference in tenderness. Breast meat is more tender so it will pressure cook faster, while legs and wings will be ...


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Because steam is hotter than water, any pieces of chicken submerged in the cooking liquid will take longer to cook, and pieces surrounded only by steam will cook faster. In either case, cooking proceeds from the outside in, so larger pieces of chicken will take longer to cook than smaller pieces. You mentioned that your mother heats the pressure cooker for ...



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