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2

If you want to speed up the cooking time and need to add more water, heat it on stovetop or in microwave till steaming, then add. Cook at lower heat just at or below simmer to keep beans more intact and with a cover on to avoid water loss in the first place. NEVER add salt at the beginning of the cooking process, only once desired doneness has been reached. ...


3

First, the short answer: There's a lot of erroneous information circulating concerning glass bakeware, and very few reliable sources or repeatable experiments seem to be cited. In general, I'd say that the variance among different metal pans of different materials, colors, thicknesses, and coatings will have more significant effects than the difference ...


0

You can parboil @ home as suggested or hydrate in cold water. We used to do this @ the restaurant all the time as it lowers the cook time to that of fresh pasta. IF you continue to let it soak depending on the type of pasta, it will re hydrate itself in cold water. Then you could just add the hot water you have @ work and the seasonings you wish.


10

Par-boiling the noodles at home would allow you to finish cooking them with just hot water. I would boil your chosen noodles 2 minutes under the package recommended time. Then rinse and chill the noodles and toss with a bit of oil and chill it. Take this to work in an insulated bag with an ice pack. A "saucy" noodle dish would be simpler to prepare at the ...


4

Rice noodles or egg noodles can be prepared in a bowl of hot water. At home, I usually make 300-400 grams of noodles in about 2 litres of water, and that serves 4 people. It's best to err on the side of more water, though. So 100g of noodles, which is a large portion for one person, in about 750ml of water should be fine. My rice noodles (3mm) take about 10 ...


1

Your best bet is probably to use rice noodles (like Vietnamese bánh phở), since they can rehydrate very quickly in hot water. When they reach the desired tenderness, you can then discard the water and mix in whatever sauce/broth/seasonings you like. Some soy sauce, fish sauce, and/or sugar would work well, since they're all shelf-stable and you can keep ...


3

There aren't any very good "rules of thumb" for specific temperatures or cooking times. I'll take a stab at the question in general terms, but it really will vary depending on the specific dishes. There are other questions which have been asked here that ask about specific cases. First, timing and temperature are separate issues. The general answer ...



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