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54

You've got a great pan and in a short time I'm sure you'll come to love it. When using a standard pan (one without non-stick coating), heat your pan dry over high heat until you can hold your hand about 6-inches above the cooking surface and feel the heat radiating upward. This allows the tiny cracks and crevices that are imperceptible to the bare hand to ...


20

If a magnet sticks to it, it's ferrous. I'd like to give a more elaborate answer, but there isn't anything more to it.


19

NO! It would not. They will break, possibly violently. Unless they are labeled for that use, don't do it.


16

Copper can be useful for certain tasks due to the its metallic properties (heats quickly, distributes heat evenly, etc.), however I would not call copper pans good "all-purpose" pans. As for cast iron, you mentioned Le Creuset, and again I would tell you that they are more of a specialty manufacturer. They make some very nice coated cast iron-ware and ...


16

I have a ceramic-coated pan too, and always treated it with care (plastic utensils, no overheating, etc.) It failed too, after some time (I think I've had it for 9 months now, and used frequently). Unlike a failed Teflon pan, it does not look or feel any different. But while at the beginning it was superslick, with everything gliding right off it in a ...


16

What makes a good pan? The main properties of a metal pan that are of interest to a cook are: Evenness of heat distribution. Every burner produces more heat in some spots than others. The better the pan conduct heat, the more this heat is evened out before it is conducted into the food being cooked, which is important to prevent local hotspots in the pan, ...


16

Lining with foil works well with cooking methods like baking or broiling, where the food is not stirred or manipulated much, and so the foil can sit undisturbed. With stir frying, you are quite likely to break through the foil while doing the stirring, and have to clean up fully in any case. Also, you probably would not get as good a stir fry due the thin ...


15

I'm not going to get into the arguments back and forth about Teflon and its associated chemicals and whether you get them in your body from cookware or not. I think there might be some risk, so just like I don't use aluminum pots (like my family had when I was a kid), I don't use teflon cookware. I use stainless cookware because I like to be able to scour ...


15

What is the advantage of a steel skillet over a cast iron one? I currently use cast iron for most everything and am curious what I might be missing. Pan sauces made with wine, vinegar, or any other acid are better in stainless steel. If you put any acid in cast-iron, you are harming your seasoning, and leeching iron into your food. This will affect the ...


14

Negative, you have not fallen victim to a weak product as far as I know. My all-clad pan works rather well, but I can't be certain it's as heavy as yours. Heft when it comes to a nice stainless pan is important. "Food" seeming to stick, be overcooked, or "not turn out well" is a little vague however. It's extremely difficult to give good advice based on ...


14

Where do you live? European Pyrex is made from borosilicate glass, the same as in laboratory's equipment; American Pyrex is made from common soda-lime glass. If you are in America, don't bother trying it at all; soda-lime glass is sensitive to thermal shock. Even though it's tempered for kitchenware, it is nowhere near good enough for the burner. In ...


13

Also, you can get uncoated steel a lot hotter than you can get teflon (which will break down -- it's basically plastic). So you can sear meats at a much higher temperature than you can cook them on teflon. For some things it doesn't matter, like sweating vegetables, but anything where you want to get some real heat involved to develop browned flavors, you're ...


13

I'm still happily using a non-stick frying pan that I've had for almost 4 years. I only use Teflon utensils. I never use harsh abrasives. After cooking, I fill it with boiling water, let it soak for a while and then wipe out with paper towels. Most of the time I just give it a quick rinse and it's ready for the next time. And buy quality - "Quality is ...


13

Flick water on the pan. If it just sits there, it's not hot enough. If it combines into balls and skates around on the pan, it's either too hot or just right for a wok or blackening something. If it sizzles and evaporates within a couple of seconds, it should be good for a normal sautee or sweat.


12

I don't see a problem with non-stick as long as you replace it when necessary. The only exception to this being woks which (I think) tend to get destroyed easily if they are non-stick.


12

Purpose of Seasoning protect bare cast iron from rust make the pan surface non-stick How often to season the pan? You'll need to season it more when it's new. Use it frequently and you'll need to season it less often. Don't cook beans or tomatoes in it at first; if you do so later, you may want to re-season it. Regarding adding butter, you're ...


12

This happens to mine, and they are most definitely stainless, not aluminum. Our stainless sink gets the same way. I assume it's from all the minerals in our water. I have found that mixing up some Oxyclean and water and a couple of minutes' soak and a scrub with a plastic scrubber will get rid of it (both from the pan and from the sink). It comes right back, ...


12

bikeboy definitely has it right, but just to be a little more specific: What you're seeing is scale, also referred to as fouling and several other terms. In all probability, it is specifically limescale that you're seeing, and it's very common in hot water taps, kettles, and on air-dried cookware. If you have hard water (or even if you don't) it will tend ...


12

You don't need to buy your cookware in a complete set like this. I would start collecting a few pieces at a time, of reasonable quality, though you will pay a bit more per piece. You're really not saving money if you have to replace all your cheap cookware every few years. You could probably handle 90% of what you want to cook with only a skillet and a 2 or ...


12

For hard, chemical-resistant surfaces such as marble, bleach or peroxide cleaners will help. On things like counters, pots and pans, a Magic Eraser will often take off the stain. Sometimes a harsher abrasive like Comet or Barkeep's Friend will be needed. Softer or porous materials, including cloth and many plastics often CANNOT BE UNSTAINED. In my ...


12

A lot of those nicely shaped cakes are made from a rectangular or round cake. You just cut the required sizes and shapes so you end up with something T-rex looking. You put a bit of frosting between each pair of pieces, so that they stick together and the cake does not fall apart. Usually the whole thing is covered with fondant, so you cannot see the ...


12

There is no problem with putting either stainless steel or non-stick pans in the dishwasher in terms of their materials. However: Non-stick pans are often better washed gently by hand without too much soap, so they retain a bit of oil. This helps them stay non-stick. You may note that a dishwashed non-stick pan is quite sticky the first time you use it ...


11

The advantage of using stainless steel is the fond (tasty brown bits) that form in the pan. It both flavors whatever you are sauteing and is often used as the base for a pan sauce.


11

I'm with @Ward -- I like being able to scour my pans for those times when even deglazing doesn't work. (although, I've found that if you ever forget about the stock that you're trying to reduce ... burning chicken bones is a nasty smell and will stain even stainless steel). I do have some non-stick, and even a non-stick flat-bottomed wok (from circulon, ...


11

The right tool for the right job. Non-stick is great for pancakes, eggs, or grilled cheese sandwiches, steel is great for searing meat and being able blend something right in the pan, cast iron is great for slow cooking and frying. I think a very minimum solution set is a cast iron skillet and a large stainless steel frying pan and steel sauce pan. Adding a ...


11

Two sous chefs, a camera crew in your face, and if you want to lose, an ice-cream maker? Honestly, if you're a "poor college student", wanting to cook like an iron chef is a pipe dream. You should be focusing on cooking good, decent food. The goal is a replacement for microwave burritos and takeout pizza, not 5-star cooking. College student could mean ...


11

No, this is a very, very bad idea. The thermal gradient can lead to uneven expansion and shattering. This is true of the modern product as well as the historical borosilicate product.


10

Make sure your pan is hot enough before adding the oil and food. You want it to be hot enough to cook the outside as soon as it lands, instead of letting the food cook to the pan by sitting on it and coming up to temperature. http://rouxbe.com/cooking-school/lessons/173-the-water-test-heating-the-pan Heat the empty pan, once heated, add a drop of water. ...


10

If you cool a pan too quickly it could deform, especially if your using a cheap pan. A cast iron pan could crack. This is most likely to happen if you dip a hot pan in cold water. If you want to get a jump-start on cleaning, de-glaze the pan with a cup of water as you would when making gravy. Pour off this liquid and set the pan aside to cool completely.


10

First, I'll say that I used to be a big fan of cast iron. I never used it for every kitchen task, but I have a lot of cast iron pans and pots, and at my peak a few years back, I was probably using it for 80-90% of my cooking. However, I now use it only rarely for specialized tasks, which I'll explain. Cast iron and copper have completely different thermal ...



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