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16

No, you can't. You should always assume glass is not safe to use on the stovetop. Essentially none of it is, and while there are a very few exceptions, they'll say so explicitly. (For example this set says stovetop-safe in the description.) That bowl is nothing special, definitely not stovetop-safe - it'd shatter under the thermal stress. If you look ...


3

Stephie's answer covers a couple convenient options: there are large ceramic pots, and any stainless steel vessel can work. (Traditionally, metal has been frowned upon for tea brewing because it loses heat too quickly, and many people are particular about maintaining a consistent temperature during brewing. I think that concern is overblown, particularly ...


2

You can brew ice tea with cold water. In fact the results are usually a sweeter more refreshing tea ( I am not talking about sugar). Fill your glass container with cold water, use as much tea as you like for the quantity and let it steep for between an hour and hour + half. The cold water doesn't draw out the woodiness of the tannins like hot water does.


3

As rumtsho has said oiling will help, but I think you have a more fundamental problem with is learning the care for your cast iron. There are lots of resources on the web to learn how to prepare, and maintain your cast iron. Some of it works even though it's wrong, some of it is very good and some of it is scientific in nature. However here are the basics. ...


0

You can oil it or not, it is up to you. Oiling it will protect it from rust if there are faults in the seasoning, and will make a nicer seasoning because the very thin oil layer will contribute to the seasoning at preheating better than the cooking oil does during cooking. On the down side, it will go rancid during storage (you may or may not notice it, ...


3

A reasonably large teapot would probably the classic choice, 1-2 liter or up to 1/2 gallon should be available either online or from your local kitchen store. For those cases where a teapot is not available, any stainless steel (= non-reactive) cooking pot should do, up to your largest stock pot for big batches. They generally come with a lid, but you'd ...



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