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12

Modern stainless steel pans with clad bottoms can be as good as copper pans.  McGee developed a simple technique to test the heat distribution where he fits a piece of paper to the bottom of the pan, placing the pan over a burner and carefully watching how the paper browns.  Thick aluminum, clad bottom stainless, and copper all worked equally well.  There ...


10

According to wikipedia, the copper bonds to the sulfur in the egg whites, which has the effect of stabilizing the foam. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Egg_white#Copper_bowl Cookwise by Shirley Corriher says the same thing.


6

I will add my (admittedly somewhat subjective) experience with using both copper and stainless. I have a couple of copper pans (all stainless lined) that I got as gifts and also some high-end stainless ones, and they're comparable in thickness (both bottoms and sidewalls), though the copper is heavier due to cast bronze handles. If I try to cook rice in the ...


5

Yes, as mentioned previously it is beneficial to whip egg whites in copper bowls BUT it is important to note that the impact on the egg whites from the copper is primarily beneficial for applications where the final product is going to be baked. You will generally not notice any increased volume in the whipped egg whites themselve. As the whites are ...


3

Downsides: Copper is toxic. You have to get the inside lined with tin. Tin has a very low melting point and can melt during cooking. Even if it doesn't, it wears off with usage and the pan has to be lined again. I don't know how easy it is to find somebody who lines, but nowadays, it is not so common. Alternatively, you can buy a copper pan with a thin ...


2

I have never sprung for copper pans, so this is just from my general research. Here are the factors I would look at: How thick is the copper? You want it to be thick enough to retain and distribute the heat of the burner. How is the handle attached? Rivets are better than welded for long term use. (This is general to any metal pan.) What is the ...


2

I'm somewhat confused by your question, as GE appears to recommend copper-bottom cookware. At least if I've grabbed the right manual, lacking a model number. Note the word recommended right below "copper bottom". Though they do warn you that you have to be diligent cleaning any residues left and not allowing cookware to overheat. (Though, depending on the ...


2

Copper is a good conductor of heat: its thermal conductivity is an order of magnitude higher than stainless steel's. I think anyone who's paid attention while using different types of cookware has seen the evidence for themselves of how this is beneficial: you get more even heat distribution and you don't get hot spots like you do w/ stainless, especially ...


1

For whipped cream it helps to have a metal bowl if you cool the cream while you whip by dipping the bottom of the bowl in ice water. You might need to do this if, for example, the cream is warm to begin with. I couldn't say though if a copper bowl would work better than any other metal bowl.



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