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16

Copper can be useful for certain tasks due to the its metallic properties (heats quickly, distributes heat evenly, etc.), however I would not call copper pans good "all-purpose" pans. As for cast iron, you mentioned Le Creuset, and again I would tell you that they are more of a specialty manufacturer. They make some very nice coated cast iron-ware and ...


12

Modern stainless steel pans with clad bottoms can be as good as copper pans.  McGee developed a simple technique to test the heat distribution where he fits a piece of paper to the bottom of the pan, placing the pan over a burner and carefully watching how the paper browns.  Thick aluminum, clad bottom stainless, and copper all worked equally well.  There ...


10

According to wikipedia, the copper bonds to the sulfur in the egg whites, which has the effect of stabilizing the foam. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Egg_white#Copper_bowl Cookwise by Shirley Corriher says the same thing.


8

I can definitely vouch for cast iron. I've had a large pot and a large skillet for the better part of 10 years, use them all the time, and they are still in near-perfect condition. Copper does last, but cast iron actually gets better with age; after a few years of steady use, cast iron pots and pans will be so well-seasoned that nothing can stick to them. ...


7

Probably subjective, but ... Good clad stainless steel will give you much better cooking performance per dollar than copper. Le Creuset is great for a couple of stew pots, but you don't want to be slinging those monsters around every time you want to boil an egg.


6

I will add my (admittedly somewhat subjective) experience with using both copper and stainless. I have a couple of copper pans (all stainless lined) that I got as gifts and also some high-end stainless ones, and they're comparable in thickness (both bottoms and sidewalls), though the copper is heavier due to cast bronze handles. If I try to cook rice in the ...


5

Summary: All materials are different, and copper is no exception. It has some unique thermal properties that may be desirable for some applications. But other combinations of materials (particularly aluminum) within a modern stainless pan can have other unique advantages that come close to -- and in some ways exceed -- copper's properties. (For a ...


5

Yes, as mentioned previously it is beneficial to whip egg whites in copper bowls BUT it is important to note that the impact on the egg whites from the copper is primarily beneficial for applications where the final product is going to be baked. You will generally not notice any increased volume in the whipped egg whites themselve. As the whites are ...


3

I wouldn't spend money on copper. It doesn't add much in conductivity. For me, it's a mix of steel (for hob-only like sauces, vegetables, sauteeing) and cast iron for casseroles (brilliant for taking straight from hob to oven and lasts for years). I don't bother with Le Crueset, though. I've used other cast iron pans that cost a lot less and do the same ...


3

Those lids appear to be stainless steel, and as such would be dishwasher safe.


3

Downsides: Copper is toxic. You have to get the inside lined with tin. Tin has a very low melting point and can melt during cooking. Even if it doesn't, it wears off with usage and the pan has to be lined again. I don't know how easy it is to find somebody who lines, but nowadays, it is not so common. Alternatively, you can buy a copper pan with a thin ...


2

I have never sprung for copper pans, so this is just from my general research. Here are the factors I would look at: How thick is the copper? You want it to be thick enough to retain and distribute the heat of the burner. How is the handle attached? Rivets are better than welded for long term use. (This is general to any metal pan.) What is the ...


2

I'm somewhat confused by your question, as GE appears to recommend copper-bottom cookware. At least if I've grabbed the right manual, lacking a model number. Note the word recommended right below "copper bottom". Though they do warn you that you have to be diligent cleaning any residues left and not allowing cookware to overheat. (Though, depending on the ...


2

One crucial thing to consider is the type of stove you will be using, gas, induction or "plain old" cast iron. Since I have never myself worked much on gas-stoves I cannot say for sure. But I am told that for gas, coppper is the thing. But only for gas. For induction copper is no-no. For a plain old stove you will need a really flat bottom surface, and ...


2

An old question, but I have a few things to add and clarify. The question is a bit like preparing to "upgrade" to a new car, and asking people: "Should I buy the Mustang or the giant Ford pickup truck?" There's really not a good answer to that question, since the items in question are at different ends of the car spectrum and they have vastly different ...


2

Copper heats up and cools down quickly. Le Creuset heats slowly but retains the heat. You can go from stove to oven in both. Copper is wonderful, but expensive and difficult to maintain. Depending on your use, tin can hold up well. If you are using it every day it will eventually require re-tinning which is also expensive. If you go copper, the commercial ...


2

Copper is a good conductor of heat: its thermal conductivity is an order of magnitude higher than stainless steel's. I think anyone who's paid attention while using different types of cookware has seen the evidence for themselves of how this is beneficial: you get more even heat distribution and you don't get hot spots like you do w/ stainless, especially ...


1

For whipped cream it helps to have a metal bowl if you cool the cream while you whip by dipping the bottom of the bowl in ice water. You might need to do this if, for example, the cream is warm to begin with. I couldn't say though if a copper bowl would work better than any other metal bowl.


1

Cheap cast iron pans are not made as well now as they used to be. I blame the huge market, faster manufacturing methods and decreasing quality of iron available. If you can find a good old pan you might be happy with it. I had vowed to not buy the expensive Le Creuset, but after several disappointments with cheap cast iron of the brands listed above and ...


1

There's nothing wrong with Le Crueset -- I have two pieces, and we had quite a few growing up (note -- don't leave water to boil, and then forget about it ... it will melt the enamel after the water boils off, and it will fuse to the stove as it cools ... all because of a failed pot of ramen by a 10 year old) -- but it's specifically enamelized cast iron ...



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