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19

Unless you have an allergy to corn, raw corn is safe to eat; it might pass through you with vigor (especially if you don't chew it thoroughly before swallowing it), but it won't hurt you.


14

Popcorn does not soften. There are five main types of corn: dent, sweet, flour, and popcorn. These types vary slightly in their composition but they share a similar basic structure: Dent corn is used almost exclusively as animal feed. Incidentally- it is the only type that I ever saw for sale in Germany which might explain why all the Germans I met ...


12

Lately, I've been direct grilling them fully stripped of the husk, with a brush of olive oil first. Its relatively quick, but requires a bit of attention as you'll need to turn the ears. You don't want the heat too high and it can be difficult not to dry the corn out. It produces a distinct favor but its absolutely wonderful, everybody raves. The slight ...


11

The best way I have found is to soak the ears in husk for several hours before grilling. This lets the husk soak lots of water. Then place the corn, still in husk, on a hot grill for about 10 minutes, ~1/4 turn, 10 minutes, turn... until the husk gets brown, even burnt. You should be able to tell when the corn is cooked by the smell. The sugars in the corn ...


9

It definitely does not need to be stirred continuously. Fairly frequently, yes, to avoid burning on the bottom, but not constantly. Cooking for more or less time has more impact on texture than flavor. Cooked briefly, you get more of a grain-like cream of wheat texture. Cooked long, you get a creamier, smoother result. Both can be good, but the creamy style ...


8

If you're cooking it on the cob, remove the silk after you've cooked it. I typically microwave my corn in the inner husk, when you pull it out the silk just slides right off.


8

Cooks Illustrated, in the March 2010 issue, tackled this problem in their usually obsessive fashion. The full recipe is behind their paywall, but they found that a pinch of baking soda added to coarse-ground degerminated cornmeal resulted in a shorter cooking time over low heat (about 30 minutes total), with whisking needed for the first minute, about 5 ...


8

When heating sugar up in boiled icing or in making candy, the problem is sugar crystallization. This happens because the solution becomes supersaturated and any movement can cause it to shift back into a crystal state. The corn syrup is there to prevent this from happening by providing glucose to 'get in the way'. You can get just 'glucose' at the ...


8

If you don't want gritty bread, use finely milled polenta. Roughly milled polenta is like semolina, and results in a gritty batter. Finely milled polenta is like flour, and results in a smooth batter. I don't know the proper names for the different milling grades in English. I don't mean cornflour, which is pure maize starch from the inside of the maize ...


8

The difference between the two can be seen below (the post it is from is an experiment comparing corn meal and flour used in anadema bread): The corn flour is the white, finer ingredient on the right. The first obvious difference is that the texture will differ between the two. The second is that it would have different uses. Both would be effective at ...


8

Good question! Corn is very versatile. I've found that fresh and frozen whole kernel corn are very interchangeable when used in casseroles. Most casseroles cook long enough that you could use either without making any adjustments. However, canned corn is a different animal. Because it is more processed I would use it in recipes that call for it but I would ...


7

Yes, you can do it without a press. Place a ball of dough between two layers of plastic wrap. Use at least twice the area of wrap that you think the final tortilla will be. Squish the ball flat with a pan, book, or your hand. Now use a rolling pin to roll the dough between the sheets of plastic. Make sure the thickness is even, and don't get it too thin or ...


7

It does depend on the corn. Eat some raw... Notice the starchy taste (Still yummy, just starchy) What you want to do is boil it just enough to drive out the starchy taste. I would get 3 cobs, break them in half, and pull one out every minute. Then have a taste test.


7

A very fresh, ripe ear of corn will have a moist, green, unblemished husk; when peeled back, its silk will also moist and clinging to the kernels. In the store, you may find that an ear of corn will have a slightly dried out husk, but if it's still green and the kernels look plump when the husk is pulled back, that ear's fine. Ignore any husks that are very ...


7

You definitely don't have to. In fact Alton Brown's recipe calls for only stirring 3-4 times during the cooking process -> http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/savory-polenta-recipe/index.html


7

You fry them in a saucepan with some oil (I use either olive or sunflower). In order they don't explode an become pop-corn, you should have kept them in water for several (6~48) hours before frying them. If you want them softer (and bigger), put them in water at 70°C for about 20~30 minutes. How do you know they are done? When they are golden in the ...


7

Corn (Maize) is clearly a cereal grain, and not any of the other things you mention. Even the farmers and agricultural agencies consider it a grain - it's one of the "official grains of Canada" and regulated by the Canadian grain commission. I'm not sure when or why it started being called a vegetable, but as far as the culinary definition goes, it has far ...


6

I've done it a few different ways -- husked, desilked, over indirect or low heat : my current favorite method; brings out the sweetness of the corn without the grassy qualities; have enough time to turn it without charring, but if you're late turning, won't instantly turn into charcoal. Takes maybe 15-20 min. Still works for corn that's been sitting for ...


6

You would use raw corn. You can either grill it on the cob, or use a mesh grill roasting pan.


6

They may be too thick. You can try placing several pieces of paper or thin cardboard into your tortilla press to get thinner tortillas. (If you aren't already using plastic or wax paper to press the tortillas, then you'll have to start, so that the paper doesn't stick to the tortilla.) Experiment with several different thicknesses until the cooking is more ...


5

You can do it. My family has done it before, and I like the outcome. The texture is not the same as with vegetable corn, it is mealier, and the outer skins are much tougher. It is up to you whether you like it. And for substitution, I don't know what is available where you live, but around here canned corn kernels are really cheap and available all year ...


5

Both are ground corn (maize, as they would have it in Europe). The difference is that corn flour is usually ground to a much finer texture than cornmeal. While in some contexts (such as breading chicken), they can both be used, you will get different textural results. In general, you want to use the right product. For example, corn muffins are ...


4

I use a soft brush (technically, it was sold as a mushroom brush). Just brush along the length of the ear, towards the stem end, and it removes almost all of the silk. (way more than I'd get done using any other method). update : So I was husking corn with my step-father, and noticed that I have much less silk left on the corn I was working on that needed ...


4

I've done it in the husk, when it's fresh (ie, the husk isn't dried out), but I don't like the grassy flavors that the husk imparts. My neighbor's clued me into a box of dry wax paper sheets to cover food for the microwave (so I can be lazy and not have to clean the microwave as often), so I wrap the corn in it after it's been husked and the silk removed. ...


4

I would suggest leaving the husk on, and just throwing it on the grill. Turn is every couple of minutes, and pull it off when it feels a bit soft to squeeze.


4

You would indeed want to leave the kernels on the corn and grill it according to the link you cited.


4

I like tucking into a cob when I pick mine out of the garden. There is nothing better than a cob of silvequeen for a light snack when you are out in the garden picking veggies.


4

There is always a debate on in-the-husk versus out-of-the-husk with roasted corn, but I fall firmly on the out-of-the-husk side of the debate. When you roast corn in the husk, the steam that is created stays largely next to the kernels. When you remove the husk, your corn is cooked with dry heat, which provides a really nice texture that has the ...


4

I found a link that will provide the explanation you are looking for: http://www.mymexicanrecipes.com/ingredients/masa-harina.html Here is a direct quote from the site: Masa is dried corn that has been cooked in limewater (cal), soaked overnight, and then ground up while still wet. Sold in this form, it's called fresh masa, and it makes the lightest, ...


4

You can soak the cornmeal in water overnight if you remember to reduce the water in your recipe to compensate for it. In your recipe, you can soak it in the milk and then you don't need to do any compensating.



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