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1

I use a coarse (polenta) grind cornmeal, and used to soak the cornmeal overnight like @Rob. Lately I've started pre-cooking the cornmeal instead. Mix the cornmeal 1-1 with boiling water, then microwave 3-4 minutes at 50%. Reduce any water/milk in the final recipe by 1/3.


1

Here is what I've learned so far about cornmeal - grinds -- there are three available that I know of: Fine Medium and Coarse. Bob's Red Mill makes all three. I think the above-mentioned 'corn flour' is one step finer than fine corn meal. Usually cornmeal is yellow, but can also be found as white cornmeal. I've only ever seen that in a find grind. ...


3

As jolenealaska pointed out in a comment, corn flour has no gluten, which is essential to the texture of most breads and many other baked goods. Unless you replace the gluten with vital wheat gluten or some kind of gluten substitute, your corn flour loaf would have a crumbly texture very uncharacteristic of ciabatta. rumtscho added: If by "corn flour" ...


1

Flint corn has a very hard outer layer to it. If it's mature and dried, you may need to simmer it for some time, then attempt to work the hull off. There was an episode of 'My Grandmother's Ravioli', where they made an indian corn soup. The recipe posted online calls for nixtamalization: Remove the corn kernels from each ear by using your thumb to ...


-1

Corn can be soaked in salt water and boiled until it is well cooked, then one can add lemon juice with chili powder to make it spicy.



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