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15

It's to prevent caking. See, for example, the second FAQ on Domino Sugar's website: It is not recommended to substitute confectioners sugar for granulated sugar. Since confectioners sugar has a much finer texture, and it contains a small percentage of cornstarch to prevent caking, substituting can give you unexpected results. Many shredded ...


9

You could try using arrowroot. This is a widely available alternative to cornstarch - it is used in cookery because it doesn't turn liquids cloudy like cornstarch does. In your case, it might work better as it also has a more neutral flavour. Substitute 2 tbsps of arrowroot for 1 tbsp cornstarch, and make a slurry with cool water as you would cornstarch. ...


6

It's the water in your skin more so than anything else that makes it stick to your hands; generally the most effective way to prevent any kind of water-based dough or batter from sticking to your hands is by greasing them. Some of the fat might get into the dough, but not really enough to make a difference. Any kind of fat will do. Vegetable oil is the ...


6

There are several alternatives, but the most common I know of are tapioca flour and arrowroot powder/flour. That said, most cornstarch substitutes aren't appropriate for pies, because they break down under high heat. The only substitutes for corn starch that I'd use in a pie are potato starch and tapioca. Tapioca powder can be hard to find in some areas ...


6

You can add cornstarch to any cold liquid, like orange juice or milk. When it's properly mixed, you can add it to the warm (hot) liquid you want to thicken.


5

When making the slurry, stir cornstarch into cold water until it has the consistency of cream. This can be set aside until it's needed, but be sure to stir it briefly before you pour it into the sauce to redistribute the starch granules in the water. You should pour it into your sauce toward the end of its preparation. According to McGee you should use ...


5

you could try some other thickeners, like xanthan gum, tapioca starch, arrowroot, or the like. not certain of the proportions, though, but i'm betting google knows.


5

Cook the flour with some butter or oil before adding to the soup. You are making what is called a roux which is a traditional French method for thickening sauces and soups Measure roughly two parts of general purpose flour and one part of fat (or equal parts by weight), and cook until bubbling and the raw flour taste has gone, or it is lightly brown ...


4

I'm going to recommend trying something a little bit different - instead of "thickening", I think what you really want is "body", which is similar, but different sensation. To get the mouth-feel I think you are after, you should try a complex sugar, like maltodextrin. Maltodextrin is a complex carbohydrate, made from starch and composed of many sugar ...


4

In an answer to another question, someone else was looking for answers on dealing with thickening dairy. If you want to address thickening with corn starch, here are some beginning steps; Use the right ratio of corn starch slurry to liquid: 1 tablespoon corn starch thickens 1 cup of liquid Use the corn starch in a slurry: although you didn't mention clumps ...


4

They are interchangeable 1:1, with virtually no changes needed. There shouldn't be any difference in the final sauce except that the cornstarch thickened one will be a bit more opaque. If you substitute the other way (use potato starch instead of cornstarch) don't let it hard boil (not for safety reasons, just aesthetics). In what country was the recipe ...


4

Cool oil. Filter through coffee filter. Store in refrigerator. You can reuse. Heat oil to deep fry temp. Fry a neutral piece of bread. Taste. You can reuse your oil as long as it doesn't impart an off taste to the bread. My guess is that, in a stove top situation, you won't get more than one or two uses before the oil is degraded too much for frying. ...


3

I don't have any info on the affect of pH, but cornstarch can make your compote separate when canned: http://www.sbcanning.com/2011/08/canning-pie-filling-education-in-clear.html. Two alternative thickeners are tapioca and clearjel. I've used clearjel for canning with excellent results. I haven't used tapioca to can, but do prefer it in my pies. (posted ...


3

In addition to MFG's excellent answer above, I'll also comment that I find tapioca starch has a very neutral starch flavor, and that substituting it for cornstarch can reduce undesirable flavors.


3

If you don't want to use Corn flour, then substitute it with Potato starch. Potato starch will give you very similar result and you won't need to change your existing recipe.


3

I've seen bread recipes like the one that you described. When bread is baked in an oven with steam- the starch in the crust is able to gelatinize before it all dries out and becomes crispy. This is what makes the crust crisp, shiny, and delicious- characteristic of "artisan" breads. Most people don't have steam enhanced ovens (or the ability to hack their ...


3

I usually start small, with maybe a teaspoon of starch and a tablespoon of water. I guess that's roughly 2/1 water to starch by volume. You do need more starch slurry for more liquid, but I advocate for going cautiously and starting with a single "dose" and then seeing if it's enough.


2

When making a slurry, I find it easier to avoid lumps by adding the liquid to the starch a little at a time. Then to use it, add a little slurry at a time to your sauce and bring it up to a bare simmer. Then add more slurry as necessary to reach the desired thickness. Another idea if you don't care about the added fat is to make a roux with the ...


2

ClearJel is a product you may want to look at.


2

Other than the thickeners mentioned above, sometimes I prefer the taste of cooked flour or oats to corn starch. Oats will leave everything moderately translucent if you use whole uncooked oats or will cloud the pie like flour (but solidify more) if you use quick oats. Another touchy option that won't effect flavor: pectin. Pectin is naturally contained in ...


2

well for the issue of thickening soup or making it creamy the best it always a cornflour. which you don't want to use. it provides taste & thickness both to the soup,it is also used it palak saag recipe. as an alternative in soup you can use either as per your taste and requirements:- 1-make a thick paste made of flour and oil. Slowly beat it in the ...


2

It all revolves around gluten and gluten chains. Cake flour is low protein, and bread flour is high protein, and everything else lies somewhere between. Individual brands have different levels of protein depending on their formulation. That protein, when combined with water, is what makes your stretchy gluten chains, and those are the difference between ...


1

If you google "vegan fondant recipe", you will find a number of recipes for fondant which do not use gelatin. In general, they use agar agar in lieu of gelatin (most seem to use flaked agar agar substituted one to one by volume for gelatin powder), and include glycerin as an anti-cracking agent. Most seem also to use some hydrogenated vegetable shortening. ...


1

Corn Flour also has an element of making rougher/crispier although it might not be much issue for you. So I would recommend few other alternatives like adding some puree (it could be potato as the above answer. Or stale bread puree). or by making Beurre Manié - which is like reverse-roux. It will thicken your soup in a similar way. Knead equal parts butter ...


1

The cornstarch does indeed prevent the extremely fine grained sugar from caking, but it also serves a purpose beyond that. Since cornstarch forms a non-Newtonian fluid when water is added, adding it to powdered sugar allows you to use it to make glazes and icings. Without the cornstarch, you'd just be pouring sweet water over your pastries, but with ...


1

It is difficult to give an authoritative answer because who knows what a "typical" pie might be like. It might be different for every person you talk to. I will therefore answer just for myself. All of the made-from-scratch pudding pies that I have made have been very similar- a lot of sugar and fat and some starch to make the gel. Usually recipes also call ...


1

Unflavored gelatin would likely work for you. It's available in most grocery stores. I'm not sure the ratio you'd want, but 1/4 oz. unflavored gelatin into 1/2 gallon (!) tea should have some effect. Also, drug stores now sell stuff that thickens liquids under names like Nectar-Thick. The stuff isn't cheap, but it's not horrifically expensive either. It ...


1

Cornstarch slurries are used because they make the crust of the bread shine. This happens because Cornstarch mixes are translucent; whereas flour mixes are opaque.


1

Creating a cornstarch slurry with a ratio of 1/2 cup cold water to 1 teaspoon cornstarch and then heating it to a gentle boil before brushing it on the bread will create a shiny golden brown crust.


1

Cornstarch can be a bit temperamental. You can weaken the strength if you cook it too long and it doesn’t do well if you reheat it. If you use a lot, it could weep. There is a much better alternative. ARROWROOT! (not to be used with dairy products) Arrowroot doesn’t cloud your gravy, doesn't alter the flavor like cornstarch can. For me, it's just a ...



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