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9

I've made cheesecake with many different types of cheese and it pretty much always worked. Of course texture and taste vary, but that's the beauty of it. Try a single cheese, see what it gives and then start experimenting mixing them. For instance cottage cheese tends to give a slightly more "crumbly" texture. To compact it you can add some fresh cream. ...


5

I hope I am not making a wrong assumption here. But German quark is a soft cheese with somewhat creamy consistency which is made from a yogurt variety (or at least a cultured milk variety) . If "yoghurt cheese" is similar to quark in the way I think it is, you are probably better off not making a substitution, but use a recipe which was made for quark (or ...


4

The only thing which can hold patties together is raw protein. Other things can thicken them, but they don't glue them. Egg is the easiest source of raw protein. In theory, you can also use the gluten in flour, but in practice, you will have to make a dough with just a little salmon mixed in it, not lots of salmon with a little flour sprinkled, and this ...


3

It sounds like whey. Evidently your block was insufficiently strained before being pressed into the mold.


3

I would suggest tofutti or follow your heart vegan cream cheeses which are excellent substitutes in terms of taste and texture. They work great in baked goods.


3

In all cheese making and especially with young cheeses like cream cheese, fat adds a lot to the flavor and texture. You can skim off extra fat but your cheese will be thinner and less richly flavored. Shaking the cream in won't help if you are using a fermented method (as opposed to using boiling and acid to curdle the milk) because it will separate out ...


3

ABSOLUTELY you can substitute cottage cheese (even fat free) for cream cheese in a cheesecake recipe. Small curd seems to work best--possibly because a bit more of the moisture is retained in the product after draining. After running the cottage cheese through a food processor (I've not found a blender quite powerful enough), you're left with an awesome ...


3

I would 'cut' a standard cream cheese like Philadelphia with mascarpone, which is essentially triple cream with a cream cheese-like texture.


2

As Katie mentions, Neufchatel is a good substitute. Granted, what follows is just based on the sodium content, and may or may not account for the extent to which the cheese tastes "salty"; however, I think if you play around with other brands you may find the right one. Philadelphia Cream Cheese is generally marketed as the essential Cheesecake making ...


2

According to North Dakota State University, cream cheese, opened should last about two weeks between 32'f and 40'f. For the cheese itself, unopened, they recommend to "Use within one week of the 'best when purchased by' date". Unfortunately, in this situation, you cannot simply cut away the mold from the cheese since it is a mixed dish. When you factor in ...


2

Mascarpone will substitute for cream cheese in most respects (except, as Elendil mentioned, the precise taste), however it will not entirely bear the same structural qualities and may lead to your cookie spreading out a bit more than the cream cheese would have (in the same way that applesauce can do the same when substituted for a fat). The varieties ...


2

Yes, that should be fine, but bear in mind that cream cheese has a sharper, subtle cheese taste whereas mascarpone is more or less triple cream, and thus milder. If you want that sharp taste, perhaps add just a little lemon juice with your mascarpone.


2

Oddly enough, a little SALT might help. Salt has the effect of blocking some sour receptors in the tongue while enhancing sweetness.


2

For ease, I agree with lemontwist: tofutti For best all natural, nicoleeats as above. Just to throw in a couple more... yogurt cheese from favorite soy or coconuut yogurt: Stir in a bit of salt (sugar can also work but cheese is high in yummy sodium) and drain by cheese cloth or fine sieve a good long while. Cheat: white frosting in a can (many are vegan) ...


2

I do like lemontwist's answer for store bought options but would also suggest this recipe as an at-home alternative. I have made it several times and find the consistency to be closer to the original cream cheese (as I remember it). Additionally I have used this vegan cream cheese recipe with the at-home cream cheese and it turned out amazing. Most of my ...


1

The time it takes is proportional to the thickness of the item heating or cooling. So, you can make the block of cream cheese (or butter, or anything else) warm up quicker by cutting it into small pieces. You need air circulation around the pieces, so they shouldn't be touching. Especially since you often already want cream cheese cut into small chunks for ...


1

Seal it in an airtight zip type bag, squeezing out as much air as possible. Submerge the cream cheese under lukewarm water for several minutes, until softened, which you will be able to feel through the plastic. You can also microwave it on low--but do it slowly, and check it frequently, taking off softened portions so that they don't overheat and melt.


1

Yes, using lowfat cream cheese could be the reason. Most of the fat content in cream cheese is saturated. Using the right amount of saturated fat in fillings or baking helps them to set or solidify better. If you use Lowfat cream cheese which has about half the fat of regular cream cheese, you are lessening from the solidifying agent of the formula.


1

I have frozen eggplant Parmesan before with good results. I breaded the eggplant, fried it, then put Parmesan on top while it was still hot enough to melt. I let them cool and then froze the fried eggplant slices separated by pieces of parchment paper. When I needed to use them, I put them on a sheet pan, still frozen, and threw them in the oven until the ...


1

I don't think this dish is ideal for freezing, but if you choose to do so, per Martha Stewart: To Freeze: Assemble dish but do not bake; wrap tightly with foil and freeze, up to 3 months. Thaw completely, then bake as directed.


1

You are likely to get a somewhat different outcome, as the yogurt cheese probably will likely contain more moisture, and have a less smooth texture than the traditional cheese used in cheesecake. This is not to say that your outcome won't be delicious, but it won't be the same. There are cheesecake recipes that are based on ricotta that might be a closer ...


1

A fabulous cream cheese frosting recipe that stays firm enough to pipe. 125g butter at room temp, 150g cream cheese straight from the fridge (Must be full fat, not a reduced fat variety, my favourite being Philadelphia) 500g icing sugar. Beat the butter till soft, add the cream cheese and beat briefly. Add the icing sugar and beat slowly until ...


1

My current favorite cream cheese frosting recipe comes from Thomas Keller's book Under Pressure - page 218. The proportions of the major ingredients include: cream cheese: 100%, butter: 68%, sugar: 132% Your recipe uses: cream cheese: 100%, butter: 24%, sugar: 80% (using the maximum recommended amount). It may be that you just need a lot more sugar (or ...


1

Based on your recipe, I would add between 1/4 cup and 1/2 cup more confectioner's sugar. Also, your recipe may match better with a sweeter cupcake.



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