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25

Whipped cream was made for centuries before the mixer was invented. :) You can do it with simply a balloon whisk. Things that may help though: Very cold cream (not freezing) Very cold bowl and whisk (put them in the freezer for 20 minutes prior to using) Copper bowl The process is simply to start slow until you see bubbles form, then speed up until you ...


16

Heavy cream can be frozen but only if intended to be used in its liquid form (soups, sauces, etc.) It will not whip properly once frozen. I agree with Pointy that there's really no point in freezing it because it's usually dated about 2 months out from the time I'm purchasing it. Additionally, if kept cold and not left out on the counter unnecessarily (as ...


16

The simple answer is: You reduce a cream sauce the same way you reduce any other sauce, by simmering it until a certain amount of liquid is gone, just like the instructions said. You have to be careful about temperature though, because milk (or cream) can burn at high temperatures, and then your sauce is ruined. You should keep it to a low or at most ...


13

I don't think so. In the mayonnaise case, all that has happened is the fat has come out of emulsion and gathered together again, so you can re-emulsify it. In the whipped cream case, you've started to create large fat crystals (butter). I guess technically it might work to heat it up to melt the butter, re-emulsify it into cream and then beat it again, but I ...


10

The ideal temperature for whipping cream is between 35 degrees F and 50 degrees F (1 2/3 degrees C to 10 degrees C). In order to maintain this temperature, you may want to chill your bowl and beaters in your fridge until cold, but you should be able to whip cream just fine as long as you do not let it rest once you remove it from the fridge. Above 50 ...


10

This is somewhat regionally-dependent. You'll want to take into account where your recipe is from. In the U.S., light cream is 18% fat (although, officially it can be anywhere from 18-30%). It is equivalent to table cream in Canada and single cream or just cream in the UK. I believe it is also sometimes referred to as table cream or coffee cream in the ...


9

I would think this is happening because your cream is just about to turn sour. As cream ages, lactic acid builds up in it. The acidity in your coffee is enough at that point to push the cream over the edge to curdling. Try newer cream or a very low-acid coffee with old cream and you should be OK.


9

When I first got my iSi I had wildly inconsistent results, including exactly what you're describing. I'm not sure if you're just whipping cream or if you're whipping other cream-based preparations, but the most common reason for this happening is that the liquid going in isn't quite, er, liquid. Any solid particles of any kind will almost assuredly cause ...


9

The cream whipper relies on gas expansion to work. When you make whipped cream by beating, you beat fine air bubbles into the cream. The cream traps air and becomes essentially a matrix that holds those bubbles--a foam. Your gas-charged whipper does the same thing in a totally different way. When you charge the whipper with gas, there's high gas pressure ...


9

You may have been served Bearnaise, which is a common red meat sauce. Bearnaise is based on Hollandaise (a mother sauce), a butter based sauce. Hollandaise is somewhat advanced to make because it is important to keep the temperature right and the ratios correct while making it, but the result is worth the effort.


9

Ice cream depends critically on the fat in the dairy to form the structure and mouth feel. Ice cream mixes there fore are typically fairly high in dairy fat. You have substituted a comparatively low fat mock cream. which simply does not have the fat necessary to create the body of the ice cream. In fact, the so-called homemade cream recipe is just ...


9

I would suggest making a Mornay sauce (Béchamel sauce with cheese) which you should find will hold together well and provide an unctuous, rich, spreadable texture. Simply melt butter in a saucepan over a medium-low heat, whisk in an equal quantity of flour, cook it out a little, then add cold milk, whisking all the while, until you get a smooth sauce like ...


8

Put cream in a small plastic bag. Fill with air, twist to close. Shake.


8

In the US, traditional Tiramisu needs to be made at home because it uses raw eggs and it would be too risky for a restaurant or bakery to sell. For years I have been making the Williams Sonoma recipe.  To get the tiramisu to come out firm I had to: Soak the lady fingers just so.  Pour a thin layer of coffee onto a plate.  Practice rolling the lady fingers ...


8

It means the butter is made from cream that hasn't been fermented. Butter made from fermented cream is known as "cultured cream butter", and it has distinct sour, lactic acid notes. Sweet cream butter tastes, well, sweet, and if it is from really good fresh milk you may be able to taste grassy notes. Both are good in their own way.


8

According to Wikipedia, buffalo milk has 8% milkfat by weight. Cow's milk is listed on that same table as 3.9%, so I'll use that figure for consistency, though the number does vary both from cow to cow and by breed. So, you need to figure out the portions in which you'd mix together whole milk and heavy cream to reach the same fat content as your buffalo ...


8

A general rule-of-thumb is that a butterfat content of 30% or more is required to produce whipped cream. Half and half (called half cream in the UK), which is comprised of half milk and half cream has a butterfat content between 10 - and 12.5% butterfat, based on various sources discovered in my research. That being said, I've read that half and half can ...


8

Short answer: cream is far from ideal as a frying medium. In the US at least, heavy cream is about 35% milkfat. Recently, I have learned the UK has a product called double cream which is closer to 50% milkfat. So what is the rest of the cream, if it is only 50% milkfat at the high end? It is water, with dissolved milk solids and minerals. Even butter ...


8

You need to make processed cheese, aka American cheese, out of it. Parmesan is harder to use in such an application than other cheeses, because it is drier. I would suggest starting with other cheeses until you have mastered the process. The basic process is to make a paste-like substance out of your cheese and some condensed milk in the food processor. ...


7

My guess is that the Belgians (like the French) rarely eat milk cold and uncooked in the way that the British do. The Belgians will have their milk in hot chocolate, or cakes etc, whereas the Brits will have it cold in cereal (again, in France at least, cereal is eaten with warm milk). I have found that the UHT milk in French supermarkets tastes a lot ...


7

Those single serving 'creamers' have been manufactured using Ultra High Temperature (UHT) processing. According to wikipedia (the most reliable information source in the multiverse!), milk treated by UHT has an unopened shelf life of 6 to 9 months. The reason there is no 'best before' date is that they are purchased in bulk by the merchant, the container ...


7

Rule of thumb, dairy in the north and coconut in southern recipes. ie korma wouldn't have coconut Indian yogurt is made with whole milk. As with western recipes, balancing the fat for good mouth-feel is important: yogurt can be a good choice when a larger quantity of liquid is called for. Cream works great when a finishing splash smooths out flavors without ...


6

There are four common ways to make fruit-flavored ganaches: Use the zest of the fruit Zest the fruit (works best for cirtus) and place the zest in the cream as it is brought to a simmer. Strain out the zest and use the cream. Use reduced juice Fruit juice from almost any fruit may be used as a liquid flavoring in ganache. The fruit juice should be heated ...


6

You need fresh, creamy raw milk to start with. Pour it into a wide, shallow pan and leave overnight for the cream to separate out. When ready, heat the milk, very, very gently for about an hour. It should never come anywhere near boiling. Leave overnight again, then you can just scoop the cream off the top.


6

What you want is cream with 35%-40% milkfat, and no gelatine or other stabilizers for whipping. If you use a lighter cream, then it will not have the rich, creamy texture, and evenly thick consistency you seek. In fact, if you use a light enough cream, it will not thicken properly. Now we enter the murky realm of regional naming differences, trying to ...


6

My spousal unit taught me to to make cream-based sauces with the drippings when pan-frying steaks. Something like: Remove meat to stand Throw in a few green peppercorns or capers Deglaze with a little brandy (not too much, if you need more liquid use hot water) Add cream, turn off the heat and stir until thickened. You can vary the spice and deglazing ...


6

Quite simply, it's the fat content. Whole milk or "full-fat" milk is 3.25% fat by weight. Heavy cream is 36-40% fat by weight. These two products are at opposite ends of the fat spectrum, and there's very little difference between 1% and 3% when it comes to an item such as caramel sauce, for which the optimal ratio is about 50% fat. (A little butter can ...


6

They are completely different. Clotted cream, also called Devonshire cream, is made by heating unpasteurized milk until a layer of cream forms on the surface. The mixture is then cooled, and the cream skimmed off. It has a butterfat content between 55 percent and 63 percent. Unlike creme fraiche it is not a cultured milk product, and is typically eaten as a ...


6

Cream whippers cleaning is not difficult, but rather heavy going, as what you usually fill them with are thick liquids. But you can clean the canister with a bottle brush and then follow the tips given in this answer on cleaning flasks. You'd also have to clean the tip and the o-ring joints, but it's easy to do so with the pressure of a normal water tap. ...


6

I am expecting my whipping siphon in the mail this afternoon. They are obviously intended for creating whip cream instantly but I find that it's best to think of this contraption as a pressurized chamber which affords you many different culinary options. Using the pressure will allow you to make instant infusions of different liquids and oils. The general ...



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