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13

The final word! After a few hours of experimenting today, this is what I discovered: No "standard" alcohol burns hot enough to caramelize the sugar using a reasonable small amount (i.e. less than 1 tbsp). Since there's an open flame, it will probably eventually caramelize the sugar, but the amount of alcohol required to burn that long makes the ...


11

Most creme brulees require baking, however after a little research I did find a recipe in "On Cooking" (Sarah Labensky/Michael Hause) that came from Chef Vincent Guerithault of Vincent on Camelback in Phoenix, AZ and his was similar in that it was not baked. First, just making creme anglaise with heavy cream isn't going to do anything to let it set up into ...


7

Anything that doesn't survive the 150° C oven is not going to survive a 1500° C blow torch. Gelatin has a melting point of about 35° C, maximum. It is a thermoreversible reaction, unlike the coagulation of eggs, which is thermoirreversible. Eggs set well in an oven, which is why they are used in so many baking recipes; gelatin does not, which is why it is ...


6

What you want is cream with 35%-40% milkfat, and no gelatine or other stabilizers for whipping. If you use a lighter cream, then it will not have the rich, creamy texture, and evenly thick consistency you seek. In fact, if you use a light enough cream, it will not thicken properly. Now we enter the murky realm of regional naming differences, trying to ...


5

Short answer: yes. Long answer: The beauty of Mastering the Art of French Cooking is that all the recipes work. They're exhaustively detailed and painstaking, and godawful complicated compared to what modern chefs are used to working with, but they work, if you follow them to the letter. They're not for the faint of heart. That being said, you might want ...


4

I think it is completely possible to make this work. The key is going to be finding the right amount of sugar and alcohol to use. You'll want to determine this in advance, but I assume you don't want to make a bunch of creme brulee to practice on. So here's what you do. Make a bunch of cheap vanilla pudding and use that as a standin in your ramekins for the ...


4

Removing a custard (which is what creme brulee) is from its form or mold does not definitely require agar agar. Flan, which is famous from a number of cuisines, is an unmolded custard. While experimentation would be required, it is highly likely that if you use a silicone based flexible form, and make a fairly stiff custard, you will be able to gently and ...


4

The technique for creating a proper layer of melted sugar on your creme brulee involves three important elements: After you add the sugar, gently swirl the ramekin to create smooth layer of sugar. You don't want it too clump or be uneven. Gently 'kiss' the sugar with the tip of the flame, moving the flame around to heat evenly, just until the sugar starts ...


3

You should pour a little heap of sugar on top of the dessert, then swirl the dish around so that the surface is evenly covered with sugar. anything that's left over, dump on to the next one (or into an 'extra sugar' dish). This is important - there shouldn't be any loose sugar on top. Now use the torch as long as you need to, although in my experience ...


3

I would prefer to give an answer that doesn't involve spending hundreds of dollars, but Modernist Cuisine has a great table about the consistency of custards comparing cooking temperature to egg concentration. If you can find a copy at your local library the kitchen guide has a table on page 233, otherwise check out volume 4 page 84. Quick synopsis: What ...


2

This looks similar to recipes that I have used in the past that worked, although I haven't tried this specific one. You can heat it higher, but it becomes dangerous. Also: mix slowly rather than beating it over heat. You need to let the egg set. More or less, the setting happens as the emulsion of cream and yolk cooks, the yolk thickens and sets up. More ...


2

I have done this before and never had a problem. My crèmes are baked in a water bath then cooled all day (at least 6 hours). I then sift fine brown sugar over top, completely covering the crèmes, then broil them closely under broiler (watching constantly) until caramelized (only few minuets); then I top with a couple of teaspoons 180 proof rum and flame. ...


2

You can use gelatin, but you then would have to change the process slightly. For a start, you wouldn't bake the custard. Instead you would essentially be making an egg-enriched panna cotta. You would hydrate the gelatine with cold water, make your custard, then add the gelatine, mix and portion, then set in the fridge. How much gelatine you use depends on ...


2

In this case, the mixing order won't make that much of a difference. You need the sugar dissolved and the yolks broken up. However, adding the sugar to the yolks will have two results: - it will allow you to more easily break up the yolks but if you mix too much it could actually aerate them- not a big risk but not good thing for creme brulee. - more ...


2

As a counterpoint to daniel's answer - whom I'm sure, in all sincerity, makes perfect crème brûlées every time and I don't doubt that you can do the same by following his method - I have made a great many (albeit substantially less than five thousand) of them and have never heated anything except the water that goes into the bain-marie. As long as you ...


1

While Rudy refers to one excellent resource, it is indeed one which the authors are quite proud of ($450 on Amazon, yikes). @Yossarian provides a much better (more economical source for essentially the same information) In his first blog post: Three Books for Every Kitchen. The New Best Recipe Book, from Cooks Illustrated (Amazon, $22.97), accurately ...


1

A few tips follow that may apply in your case: Before baking the brulees, use the torch on any bubbles formed in the liquid custard so that uneven patches don't become baked-in. Use fine grained (caster) sugar so that any unmelted crystals will be less noticeable. Swirl the sugar around in the ramekin and then get rid of excess sugar by tossing it onto a ...


1

I can see I am WAY late here, but, I'd recommend simply using the torch on a really thin sugar coat in advance. Than, prior to serving, pour alcool on them and flambé. No one will notice/mind the fact that it's not the flambé that actually created the crust. I am French and work in a French restaurant and this is own we do it.



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