Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

25

I think it might be the humidity inside the oven that's making the difference. After cooking one pizza, the oven is filled with the steam given off by the cooking dough, sauce, etc. The humid air in your oven is probably heating the pizza up faster and more evenly (which is what you want for pizza). Try putting a pan of hot water in your oven for a few ...


15

The trick is steam and high heat. Heat your oven up to 450 F (230 C). Bring a pot of water to boil on your stove. Once boiling, pour the water into a deep roasting pan on the bottom shelf of your oven. If you can place it directly on the bottom of your oven (it doesn't obstruct vents) then that is ok too. 1" (2.5 cm) of water is enough. Let the steam ...


14

From Encyclopizza There’s a difference between bubbles formed from under-proofing versus over-proofing. Bubbles from under-proofing tend to be flat but large in diameter. If unpopped, they can blow up an entire pizza. This is the process by which pita or pocket bread is made. Bubbles from over-proofing tend to be high but smaller in ...


14

"Shortness" in dough refers to its tenderness which is influenced by the amount of fat as well as sugar. If your quiche recipe is calling for a short dough, it would be referring to a higher ratio of fat since pastry for quiche typically doesn't include sugar. Both fat and sugar minimize and break down gluten development which results in "short" protein ...


12

Normally, a bun for a hotdog or hamburger is going to be made of a softer, sweeter dough. It will have higher egg, milk, fat, and sugar content. It is a slightly softer (more water) dough than a white bread dough (and a lot softer than a crusty, lean loaf like french). You will definitely want to bake it at a lower temperature, 425 is far too high. I ...


10

Rice flour should work well for this; it produces very crispy crusts.


8

I like nuts that are finely chopped, kinda like bread crumbs. Almond flour will perhaps work as well.


8

When preparing regular pie pastry, first chill the standard 30 minutes in the refrigerator before freezing. Chilling of pie pastry does two things: Relaxes the gluten that has developed during mixing Hydrates the starch granules (the more moisture the starch granules absorb, the more tender the final result) Placing pie pastry right into the freezer ...


8

For a deep-dish pizza, around 425°F is right, and so is 20–30 minutes. That's starting with cold dough (need to keep the butter layers chilled, at least for a Chicago-style pizza). Cooking in an aluminum 3" deep cake pan is fine. I suppose cast iron should work too (though it'll heat slower, so might take longer). As has been pointed out in comments, the ...


7

A light brush with an egg wash will give you a nice color to your bread every time. Crack one egg into a bowl and add about ½ teaspoon of water. Wisk the egg well. After your dough is formed and ready for the oven, brush a light coating of the egg wash onto the dough and put it in the oven. After that, cook as you normally would. Another thing you can ...


7

Yes, it is mainly tradition, appearance, and how you like the ratio of crust to fruit in your pie. You can make any pie open faced, with a full top, or any type of lattice top. The other thing to consider is that a top crust provides some heat insulation to the fruit, so if you don't want the fruit to caramelize as much, it will help with that.


7

My knowledge of how to make bread is almost entirely from The Bread Baker's Apprentice, which cannot be praised too highly. To make a crackling crisp bread crust, preheat your oven to as high as it will go with a pizza stone inside and a heat resistant pan capable of holding 8 fl. oz. of water elsewhere on the rack or on another rack (I do mine on the rack ...


7

The steam should only be used for the first part of baking. Recipes vary in opinion on how long it's best to have this steam, but the range I've seen is usually 10-30 minutes. The moist baking environment allows the outer layer of dough to remain stretchy so that you maximize "oven spring" in the first part of baking. Steaming the dough also causes the ...


7

From On Food and Cooking: Acidity in the dough - as from a sourdough culture - weakens the gluten network by increasing the number of positively charged amino acids along the protein chains, and increasing the repulsive force between chains. And weaker gluten structure is definitely a good thing for pastry doughs! From the same source: [Eggs] ...


6

After the dough has been rolled and stretched, dock the dough. You can buy a fancy docker (a 'spikey' rolling pin type device) but unless you make lots of pizzas, it seems silly to have a specialized tool. A fork will work just fine. I must admit, I've been caught with a fork in each hand "drumming," dancing, and singing whilst making pizza. :)


6

I generally use a fairly wet dough and add oil as well. One of the keys is to keep kneading to a bare minimum. This makes for a lighter dough because it has more air bubbles - kneading kills them. As for flour type, I like '00' type, but there are advantages to other types of flours - as 00 absorbs less water. If you want to read a completely comprehensive ...


6

My recomendation would be to roll out the dough and pat it into the pie-plate and cook it with out any fillings (blind baking) you will probably need to poke holes into the bottom to keep it from bubbling up (docking). After it is fully cooked pull it out and let it cool. I would only use no-bake fillings in this, I don't think the cookie crust would react ...


6

I recently read somewhere (I forget where) that if you're only storing it for a day or two, standing the loaf cut-side down on a cutting board worked fine. The crust stays crisp, and the cut edge is protected and doesn't go stale. Storing it that way much longer than a day or so probably would risk going stale. Unfortunately, we don't get to do this much ...


6

Hearty and hot dog buns aren't two ideas you see put together very often. If you're doing something like using some amount of whole grain flour in the buns then you're going to get a chewier crumb and crust just because of the recipe you're using. If you are making a richer/sweeter dough already then yes, lower temperature will help. I looked at a couple of ...


6

This is not a Strudel recipe. Аs BaffledCook showed with his recipe, a Strudel is made with a phyllo dough (flour and water, usually no egg at all). The dough is then rolled out until it is paper-thin, and the filling is rolled into it. The dough gets a bit hard and flaky after baking, especially if the filling is somewhat dry, but it doesn't fall apart. ...


6

In November 2007 a recipe was published in Cooks Illustrated for a Foolproof Pie dough with vodka. That recipe was created by J. Kenji Lopez-Alt who was one of the chefs on America's Test Kitchen and writer for Cooks Illustrated. He has an article about the recipe here ...


6

Use the butter; historically margarine is a simulated butter in the first place, and you will probably get a better product, since butter tastes much better. You could use the shortening, but it will not help the flavor at all, and doesn't have the approximately 18% water that butter and margarine do, although this usually doesn't matter in a graham cracker ...


5

The last time I made "breaded" chicken, I had some spare lentils leftover and decided to pulse them in the food processor and try using them (not quite to a fine powder, but closer to that than whole). The result was delicious, a little bit of a nutty flavor, and a great crunch.


5

Another possible method is to bake the bread in an oven-proof pot with the lid on, which will help to keep the steam in. This is essentially the method I use in baking no-knead bread, which uses a dutch oven. I bake the dough for 30 mins with the lid on and 15 mins more with the lid off. The result is crusty brown bread.


5

Maybe its your oven and not the dough? Are you letting it get fully heated?


5

To add to what the others have said about adding steam in to the baking process, which is very important with baguettes. Baguettes benefit from a decent tray to cook them on, specially made trays are easy enough to obtain, the mesh variety allow steam to get to more sides easily.


5

For crusty bread, try a paper bag. It'll help keep the bread crusty, and it won't dry out quite as fast as being left on the counter.


5

The answer provided by mrwienerdog is true, but short on details. Heat oven to at least 500 degrees F, ideally with a pizza stone inside. Also inside should be a thick metal pan that can handle having water poured into it. Carefully position shaped, proofed bread on a pizza peel or unrimmed baking pan that is generously dusted with corn meal. Heat 1 c. ...


5

As mentioned below, you need to maintain a high temperature and steam the loaf for part of the baking time. An easy way to get both of these things in a home oven is to use a covered cast-iron or ceramic pot and pre-heat it with the oven. The mass of the cast-iron maintains a consistent temperature, and the cover allows the loaf to steam in its own water. ...


5

This seems like a fun adventure. I'll say upfront that I've never tried what I'm about to suggest. When I read your question title the first thing that came to mind is a Puerto Rican sandwich that is very popular in Chicago, the jibarito. It's a sandwich in which the bread has been replaced by flattened and fried plantains. I think doing something similar ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible