Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

7

Traditional fermented pickles were kept in barrels, but they're not the kind that you buy in a big jar at Costco. Those pickles have been briefly cooked in a brine, and should be refrigerated after you open the jar. The salt and vinegar should keep them safe for a while, but they will likely go bad at room temperature before you finish eating the whole jar. ...


6

Not too surprisingly given where you found it, it's called an Israeli Salad in most parts of the world. In Israel, it's just called a chopped salad or (according to the wiki article - I never personally encountered this) an Arab salad.


5

It certainly sounds like they have gone bad yes. A bad smell is a dead give away. As with any such situation, a few cucumbers (or whatever you're unsure about the safety of eating) are not worth getting food poisoning over: if in doubt, throw it out.


5

I buy at the farmer's market from a gentleman that I know grows his well and they are always sweet- peel or no peel. He told me that bitterness in cucumbers is primarily a factor of how they were grown. Cucumbers with a consistent watering schedule will be sweeter than those that are grown with less attention. The amount of sunlight and heat makes a ...


5

The biggest thing you can do is peel it. If a cucumber's bitter, it's much more in the peel than in the flesh. It's also usually more bitter at the stem end, so you might want to start from the other end, and possibly ultimately discard an inch from the stem end if it really is too bitter for you. Unless you're unusually sensitive to the bitterness, that ...


4

The non refrigerated life of things like pickles can be greatly enhanced by careful access to the barrel In a closed room with still air open the barrel and using a very clean ladle decant enough to fill your normal sized jar and then close the barrel firmly and store in cool dark place As long as the main storage barrel is only open a few times in clean ...


4

I tried freezing tzatziki sauce but wasn't happy with it when thawed as it seemed to separate easily and even when mixed thoroughly it seemed to have a different, more watery texture than when fresh. What I do now if I have cucumbers I need to use is to prepare and process them exactly as I would for fresh tzatziki sauce. I freeze the processed cucumber in ...


4

No, this is nonsense. Bacteria are everywhere, crawling over all of your food. This is why food spoils - quickly outside of the fridge, within a few days in the fridge. Touching food with your fingers should not introduce any new bacteria species, except in some extreme cases (e.g. if you have been handling soil and not washed them well, or if you have a ...


3

According to the New Cookbook, from Better Homes and Gardens (p. 106), pickling cucumbers should be picked and used in the same day. Standard salad cucumbers last about ten days. Trying to get from 1 to 10 is a bit of a stretch, and storage considerations can vary. Some people recommend the standard washing and wrapping in paper towel, others indicate ...


3

Whenever you see froth in a bottle or jar that has not been shaken it indicates that some fermentation process is happening. If there is also a bad smell, you have bacteria doing the fermentation that is causing the froth. Throw them away - lord only knows what bug is causing the problem, and it is not worth the trouble of finding out. OTOH it may be time ...


3

If you want to match the texture of the shredded cabbage you could use a peeler to get thin, long strips of the cucumber. If you want to contrast the texture you could cut it into chunks or slices. I would discard the seed pulp to cut down on the amount of water that will fall to the bottom of the bowl. The skin is completely personal preference. If it's ...


3

Cucumbers contain a bitter compound called cucurbitacin that can be found in the skin and just underneath. There is a trick you can do to reduce the bitterness without having to peel the cucumber. Cut 1/2cm off the stem end and rub it in a circular pattern against the cut flesh in a circle. This will yield a slimy white substance - this is the stuff that ...


3

The description itself is the base for Fattoush, which has as many names as variations: I found one place that calls it "Jerusalem Salad" (theirs is served with tahini). Another restaurant has a variation that includes green bell peppers called "Lebanese Salad." (Click here for a bunch of pretty pictures)


3

In Turkey it is referred to as Çoban salatası (pronounced 'choban'; shepherd's salad.) Usually consisting of tomatoes, cucumbers, onion, salt, oil, lemon, and sometimes pomegranate juice.


3

There's no difference between the stem or blossom end, you should save the end which looks and feels in the best shape.


2

In Australia, I think it's just called Greek Salad. It has Tomato, Cucumber, Onion, Olives & Fetta Cheese + Olive Oil + some lemon Juice and so on..


2

Probably not in Israel, but there is an Iranian recipe called Salad-e Shirazi. It contains chopped tomato, cucumber, onion, lime juice, olive oil, fresh mint, salt and pepper.


2

I have never encountered a bitter cucumber. Or maybe I just like the bitterness they have -- I bemoan the selective breeding of brussels sprouts to remove bitterness, after all. Something that works for courgettes, though, is to slice them, salt them, and allow them to stand for 20 mins or so. The salt will draw out the bitter juice. Rinse away the salty ...


2

Traditional sour/salty pickles certainly don't need refrigeration. Commercial pickles might be another thing entirely, however, if their brine is weaker. If the brine is too weak, expect mold to develop on the surface. Even then, I doubt that they would become unsafe before the brine grew mold. I'd say if your pickles didn't come from the refrigerator ...


2

I find that more than anything, getting a sweet cucumber comes down to selecting it correctly. I have purchased hundreds of cucumbers (and I prefer to eat them with the skin on). What I've noticed is that cucumbers whose skins are both shiny and smooth (and not waxy), and the cucumber itself is firm when you squeeze it are almost always going to be sweeter ...


2

I have eaten pickles kept at room temperature for many months with no sign of spoilage. Here is a bit more explanation :) Anything can spoil eventually, refrigerated or not. Keeping something under a lid and refrigerated restricts the number of airborne colonizers that might get access to it, and the cold temperature means that even if they get there, they ...


2

I haven't tried it, but I don't see why not. Sure, cucumbers have a lot of water, but you're already crushing them in a blender or processor to make the sauce, so you don't have to worry about bursting cell membranes. I suppose if you made some kind of chunky tzatziki, you might be concerned about a change in texture. I've never seen a chunky tzatziki (and ...


2

This was going to be my first comment on Seasoned Advice, but after reading the preface about writing answers, I'm wondering if 55 years of every-day family cooking qualifies me. Forging ahead fearlessly and with nothing to back me up except personal habit, save the root ends of onions, the blossom ends of cukes and tomatoes.


1

I wouldn't freeze tzatziki sauce. Dairy practically never freezes well. It is a fat-water emulsion, and it is likely to change its structure a lot upon thawing. You have to prepare it and stabilize it a lot, and then also preferably use a special freezing method (such as making ice cream with agitated freezing). The other part are the cucumbers, which ...


1

My wife and I are having a mexican stand off over this issue: refrigerate or not regridgerate; I like them room temperature and shee likes them cold. I think they are okay because they are fermented. Vinegar and salt are preservatives. That being said, I think staying out for a week or so pickles are safe to eat. To go longer I don't know because they ...


1

In this wild world of litigation, it surprises me that there is anything left that DOESN"T state, "refrigerate after opening....." With that said, I'd feel safe to assume that refrigeration really isn't required, granted one follows some general rules-of-thumb; try to store it away from light and heat. I prefer cold pickles but sometimes I just don't have ...


1

Mast O Khiar, as you mention mainly consist of plain yogurt and cucumbers and most recipe do not require much more than that. Because of such, the shelf life for the yogurt product will be the shelf life of the yogurt itself. If it is a store bought yogurt, then the shelf life should be about 2 weeks in the refrigerator. Make sure to store the sauce in an ...


1

From what I've read, leaving the scum on reduces the salinity of the brine, which changes fermentation. Skim the scum so that the salt level stays the same ... check out "Wild Fermentation by Sandor Katz.


1

I make pickles similarly, but not quite the same way: I usually make half-sours, as even the 5.6% salinity of that recipe would be way too salty for my family's tastes. I boil the brine before using it, letting it cool before adding it to the cucumbers. I use a clear glass jar rather than something opaque like stoneware, which might change the mechanics a ...


1

I would try using peeled cucumbers, because of the texture issues. You can grate them into a sieve, and then put some weight on them for half an hour or so. This will help drain some of the excess liquid. This is the same preparation of the cucumbers that is used for cucumber raita, or tzaziki.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible