Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

29

It's actually spelled 'roux', and is a mixture of oil and flour, cooked to remove the starchy taste of the flour. It's a great thickener any time that you don't need the sauce to be clear, and you have time to cook it down. I typically use it for cream sauce (including cheese sauces, such as for mac & cheese) and gravies. As for benefits -- it's habit ...


26

Chickpea flour (gram flour, besan) is very useful in Indian cookery. The most common use in the West is probably for making bhajis and pakora. The most popular of which are Onion Bhajis, very popular in the UK. They are essentially an spiced onion fritter, shaped in either discs or balls. Any vegetables can be used to make pakora (which is essentially ...


15

It's not going to be nice to drink a day later, no matter what. I'd use it in baking a chocolate cake or something like that instead, if you can't bear to throw it out. The problem is not just the reheating, which will further cook the coffee and affect flavour, but that it's been losing aroma and oxidizing for a day first. If you're serving it to anyone ...


15

I grew up with a Vietnamese mother that used to put fish sauce in nearly everything. While I can't exactly recommend all of her uses (she once used it in a texas beef chili -- was not good), there are a few techniques that are good to know. A common method to create a savory sauce is to use fish sauce with sugar at a 2:1 ratio. For example, you can make Dau ...


13

They're generally good for adding some crunch, too, not just the flavor. A few things that come to mind: on top of a salad - my family does a roasted corn and black bean salad; also probably good instead of croutons in salads where they're a better flavor/style fit garnish on a soup - tortilla soup, sopa de elote... as part of a breading for fish or ...


12

The quickest way to get rid of leftover wine is to think of it as flavoured water. In many if not most recipes that call for water - especially stovetop recipes like sauces and stews - you can simply substitute wine for the water or stock that the recipe normally calls for. We actually had a similar question recently: In what kind of recipes can I ...


10

A "Roux" is a mixture of 50% butter, 50% flour that is used as a starch thickener for a number of "mother" sauces (notably Béchamel, Espagnole, Velouté). For a white sauce base, you may heat both butter and flour together in a saucepan over a low flame while combining with a wooden spatula. After just 30 seconds mixing, you will get a consistent ...


10

Coffee can be used for a variety of things BESIDES drinking straight. Off the top of my head, you can use less-than-perfect beans for: Chocolate mousse and cakes: brew into coffee, and add to the chocolate mix for a richer flavor Ice cream and sorbets. Coffee ice cream is awesome, and the cream will mask defects Chocolate-covered coffee beans. These ...


9

Sumac is commonly used a tart flavoring element in the eastern Mediterranen region. Historians believe that it was the common sour element in cooking for that area prior to domestication of lemons. It is a characteristic seasoning element in Fatoush, a Syrian bread salad. It's not usually available in the mainstream spice section of most grocery stores. ...


9

Personally, I just throw them into stir fries or fried rice (add them near the end of the cooking time). I've also had them slightly stir fried with pea shoots in sesame oil. Simple but delicious. Tofu666, an amazing vegan blogger, fries them often. Here's a sample: http://veganmenu.blogspot.com/2007/06/seitan-and-lentil-stew-fritto-misto.html This page ...


8

easiest way is to mix it with the sauce and heat both up together. Usually I'd do this in a pan, but you could use a microwave. If you have to heat the pasta up on its own, what I usually do is do it in a pan and add a little boiling water, just a couple of tablespoons, enough to stop it sticking, and keep stirring until its warmed through. If it starts ...


8

The best I can offer you comes from Functionality of Proteins in Food: The gelation of egg yolk can be partially reversed by heating after thawing. This treatment improves the functional properties of proteins. The stiffness of the gels obtained after frozen storage can be reduced by more than 50% and become pourable at 21° C by heating up to 45° C for ...


8

The comb, which is beeswax, holds the honey. Honeycomb is used for decorative desserts, placed on or along side nicely arranged fruit, is used as a spread on toast or bread or crackers and is served with cheese platters. As a child I loved honeycomb, would pop a hunk in my mouth and chew like gum until all that was left was the wax, and either spit the wax ...


8

Bread crumbs - dry them and grate them Bread dumplings - some recipes, like serviettenknödel, work well with crust (for softer heels) Crispbread - cut them into rectangles, and toast them for a long time in a low oven. use to serve cheese (for more chewy heels) Bread-thickened soups, such as sopa de ajo (for softer heels). Feed birds or ducks


8

Back meat on poultry tends to be rubbery, inaccessible, and there is relatively little of it. The meat is almost like other dark meat but is found only in thin sheets. Also since, during tradition roasting the back meat is down in the pan, it tends to be less cooked than is pleasant for dark meat. It isn't practical to try and carve it because it is a ton ...


8

Taste the meat and if it still seems edible to you then there is no reason to throw it out. When I make stock, I keep it on a simmer for much longer than three hours and any meat is completely tasteless by the time I'm done. Three hours, however, is about how long you would cook meat to make a stew, so it's quite possible that you could eat it. On the ...


7

Back in the late '90s, biologist Joe Staton did a comparative study of the tastes of different animals for the Annals of Improbable Research. His hypothesis was that the relatedness of tastes of animals is correlated to their evolutionary ancestry. You can read an abridged version of his article here. Looking at the phylogenic tree at the bottom of the ...


7

the Serious Eats blog had an article about asafoetida recently -- it also goes by the name "hing" (not sure if you ran across that in your googling). the article is interesting (so are the comments), and offers some ways to use it: http://www.seriouseats.com/2010/06/spice-hunting-asafoetida-hing.html


7

Rendered beef fat can be used in a lot of ways. You can use it in place of oil in a lot of recipes, but finding out which ones you like will take some experimenting. Around our house, I use rendered fat from beef or bacon in place of oil when sautéing, for example with onions and peppers, garlic or mushrooms. I've also used it to add some kick to gravies. ...


7

Mix it into new batches of artisan bread. It will give you some awesome flavor. I doubt that sealed in the fridge it was able to pick up any interesting bacteria that would make it a sourdough starter but it would still be a more adventerous flavor than a young dough. You could try making bread with just this dough but I would be afraid of it being too ...


7

Depending on how many people you are going to have, you won't have leftovers. A goose is much smaller than you think it is based on "A Christmas Carol". I did goose one year for 5 people, then my mother added a bunch of strays for Christmas dinner, ending up with 10 people and a tiny taste of goose for each person. It's a family story now, but wasn't a ...


7

Besides the obvious of actually using it to make bread products, you can store some for a rainy day (ie, something goes wrong with your starter), or to give away: smear it thinly on a sheet of parchment, wax paper, or aluminum foil. (you may need to add liquid and let it hydrate if yours is too stiff to spread) let dry crumble up store in an airtight ...


7

Wine is excellent for deglazing a pan and making a pan sauce. Basically, if you a have a pan with any fond on its bottom, like a pan where you have sautèed meat or even onions, you can just add the wine (don't turn off the heat yet, just lower it), scrub vigorously the bottom of the pan until all the fond has dissolved in the wine, then let it reduce a bit ...


7

Your instincts are good; throwing tasty broth away is a criminal waste! I have a couple ideas that are worth a shot. Risotto: use it for the broth or stock. You may wish to add some more sausage and seasfood bits in for extra tastiness. Rice/pilaf: use the broth in place of water for cooking the rice. It'll give a richer flavor to the result. Bisque: ...


7

I agree that you can get some good meat from the head and could use it to flavour Bouillabaisse, i wouldn't however use it for stock as oily fish can lead to a cloudy fatty stock rather than the clearer and more flavoursome fish stock that can be derived from the off cuts and bones from white fish.


7

I have only seen it used in dahl dishes, presumably because of it's claimed digestive properties. Asafoetida is incredibly pungent; anything more than a pinch seems too much and unpleasant. I think of it as a flavour-enhancer, a natural, Indian MSG rather than a spice in the normal sense. It makes your mouth water quite intensely and seems to stimulate the ...


7

Fish sauce is used as a general flavor enhancer, as it is very high in glutimates, the so called umami flavor. As the Wikipedia article says: In addition to being added to dishes during the cooking process, fish sauce is also used as a base for a dipping condiment that is prepared in many different ways by cooks in each country mentioned for fish, ...


7

The use of vinegar in the cheese production is irrelevant. Cheese made with the acid from vinegar or cheese made with the acid from a bacterial culture should be similar. The difference is in how high the milk was heated when the cheese was made. The albumin in milk denatures and precipitates at about boiling temperatures. If the milk was boiled before the ...


6

as mentioned by others a 'roux' is flour and oil/butter mixed together, while under heat. a roux is normally used for thickening sauces (usually cream/cheese type sauces). the benefits of using a roux, are that your sauces will not get lumpy. Try just adding flour directly to the sauce next time. All you will get are lumps of flour in it. Not nice! the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible