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7

The use of vinegar in the cheese production is irrelevant. Cheese made with the acid from vinegar or cheese made with the acid from a bacterial culture should be similar. The difference is in how high the milk was heated when the cheese was made. The albumin in milk denatures and precipitates at about boiling temperatures. If the milk was boiled before the ...


5

Brunost is often used in Norwegian cooking, especially in brown sauces. E.g. http://translate.google.com/translate?sl=no&tl=en&js=n&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.tine.no%2Foppskrifter%2Fsesong-og-tema%2Fpr%25C3%25B8v-brunost-i-maten I have personly used brunost for such a recipe, and it does add a very nice flavor to the ...


4

Often, assuming they are not too burned, you would make a simple pan sauce from the fond and fat left after pan-cooking a steak. Methods vary, but might include sauteeing some shallots or onions in the fat, deglazing with wine, and/or adding a slurry of flour to thicken. You would then serve with the steak. Other than this, there is no general purpose use ...


4

In my experience (I'm Texan, I've seen my share of okra), 2.5-3" is pretty small, and 6" is on the big side but I wouldn't expect it to be inedible. It's certainly going to be much more tender at 2.5-3"; there's no possible way it'll be too tough to eat. Larger does mean tougher, but at that size they might still be okay (for example this source says 4-6" is ...


3

If you really don't want to bake anything else, you could bake the crumb on it's own. I'd be sure to put it on parchment or a silpat to avoid it sticking to the surface below. Bake it at 350F or so until it's browned. Once it's baked, it should last a while as long as it's stored in an airtight container. It would probably be good as an ice cream topping?


3

They're certainly edible, but you might have to work for it. A Western view from Purdue CropINDEX: Tamarind seeds have been used in a limited way as emergency food. They are roasted, soaked to remove the seedcoat, then boiled or fried, or ground to a flour or starch. Roasted seeds are ground and used as a substitute for, or adulterant of, coffee. ...


2

I am from the southern state of India, Kerala. In our area (majorly in Southern India), asafoetida is generally used for making Sambar which is nothing but a curry with gravy and mix of different completely cooked vegetables. This is something which we have with Rice during Lunch\Dinner or with Idly\Dosa during Breakfast hours. In addition to that it is ...


2

I've recently been experimenting with this, and the best I've come up with is mixing it with hot milk. I make 2-cup stove top espresso machine each day, 1 for the morning and 1 for the afternoon. I used to drink the afternoon cold as I couldnt find any other way to drink it and it still taste nice. But now I put about 50ml of milk in the cup, heat it in ...


2

With a strongly-flavored sauce, you won't mind the meat not having much flavor. The protein value of the meat is still intact, so it is worth using it up to stretch the family food budget. Curries are a good use for soup meat, and as Sobachatina said, pot pie. I make a thick onion gravy as a pot pie base and that makes even the most tasteless soup meat go ...


2

You can make chips and halwa from half-ripe/ripe jack fruit,its famous snack in Indian states Even though the process of making chips is time consuming,the taste is explainable First step is to open the raw fruit then chop off the middle stem and pull out the the jack fruit ,then deseed it and slice into thin slices Ingredients for chips. Jack fruit- 1 ...


2

You can get them dried and otherwise processed from Amazon, rose water too. Fresh is going to be a greater challenge. I don't know of a better answer than letting your fingers do the walking or making friends with a gardener. Of course, if money is no object there is always an option.


1

The purpose of this liquid is to prevent the cheese or tofu from drying out. Its main use is for storage, not for consumption. If you don't consume the cheese at once after opening the original package, you are supposed to transfer the liquid into a storage container, or replace/fill up with water. There are people who drink the whey, because they like the ...


1

I don't know that you'd want to make a full meal of it, but it sounds like you'd enjoy nutritional yeast. You can find it at any "health food store" type of grocery. It is deactivated, so you don't need to worry about it filling you up with CO2. The flavor is somewhat reminiscent of Parmesan cheese. Googling "nutritional yeast recipes" will give you plenty ...


1

It sounds like you have made what is essentially an oddly flavored vegetable broth. According to Still Tasty, that should last about 4-5 days refrigerated. The leftover ginger and tumeric is going to have given most of its flavor into the broth. I don't think you would want to use it for anything, although it would be safe to eat.


1

If I were in this situation, I would have frozen the 2nd meal in a zip lock bag. Flatten the bag so that it is as thin as possible. When ready to eat, thaw. Bring a pot of water to a simmer. Turn off heat. Toss bag in water. Let it reheat that way for 10 to 15 minutes. Enjoy. You can also do this directly from frozen. It will just take longer and ...


1

I tend to keep some of the butter that I have use in cooking previously, especially if it isn't burned and has some good flavour infused into it. For example, the next time you cook your steak why don't you strain the butter and set it again in the fridge. The next time you fancy a steak sandwich use that butter for the bread. It will add a little bit ...


1

Actually the use of vinegar in cheese making is totally relevant. Vinegar based cheeses are referred to as heat/acid precipitated cheeses. The main difference is that the lactose has not been consumed during the fermentation process that cheeses made from bacteria cultures and rennet goes through, leaving the lactose in the whey available as a food source ...


1

I just used fish sauce myself for the first time, in a stirfry. The stir fry included veggies I had in the frig (green onions, summer squash, mushrooms, snow peas) along with chicken breasts (and of course garlic and peanut oil). As soon as everything was cooked, I added fish sauce (about 1 tablespoon or two) and a couple of teaspoons of Sesame oil. It was ...


1

Scallop roe parfait is a firm favorite in my kitchen. Gently poach the roe then blitz with soft butter and whatever spices/flavours take your fancy. Then set in a mould lined with cling film. We use small PVC pipe to set it as it's a garnish for dish. But served by itself spread on toast is a real treat for everyone


1

Microwave method- Use a defrost setting like #2 instead of #10 full power, every microwave is different, I also reheat steak and Prime rib this way and it is excellent, be patient and it will turn out nicely. P.s I am in the Restaurant biz.. Stove Top- Reheat in the sauce if you have it on low, if not reheat in a light beef bouillon water on low or about ...


1

If you have the cinnamon shredded wheat left over, you could use it on french toast right after you dip the bread in the egg/milk mixture, and before you put it in the pan. Another way to recycle it is to make a snack dessert with walnuts, loose cinnamon shredded wheat, cocoa, and peanut butter. Mix it all up and add powder sugar at the end (Shake it in a ...


1

I've made a green tea and garlic cream sauce using matcha, which I thought was pretty nice. It's tricky to pull off, as I learned when someone tried my imprecise steps transcribed and found the result "bland", but I came to the conclusion that it was likely a difference in the amount of salt used. Matcha-iri Genmaicha, which is a toasted rice green tea that ...



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