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5

The Nordic Food Lab, founded by René Redzepi, has experimented with blood as egg substitute, full blog entry including recipes here. Apparently texture-wise the substitution can be possible, but the typical bloody aftertaste is hard to mask, which might have to do with the physiological way the metallic taste is perceived. It seems especially women tend to ...


4

I always save all my scraps to make stock. I'm not sure what you would do with lamb stock, but it would probably make a good sauce to use on lamb. The fat that renders out is also useful for future cooking of whatever it came from (duck fat for duck confit, for example). I just throw all the scraps into a slow cooker with celery, carrot, and onion ...


2

put some cooked and drained noodles in a bowl, add a generous knob of butter, moisten with warmed cream, and stir in Lea & Perrins Worcester sauce to taste, Marmite to taste, and grated Parmesan to taste.


2

I recently made vegetable broth and used the leftovers as the base for a creamy potato soup: I threw out onion skins and bay leaves, but kept the rest and added an equal weight of potatoes, water to cover, boiled and seasoned it, blended, and simmered with cream. Simple, efficient.


2

I just took my cool beet juice, threw it in the vitamix with some ice and a blood orange and a dash of stevia..... Yuuuuuuuuummmmmmmm! Wowie!


2

Apparently the claims aren't fake (see Stephie's answer) but the photo sure is. The photo is of blood orange sorbet, from this blog: (I'm assuming the blog is the original source; I can't find any other instances of the picture online, and they have a lot of other photos of the same thing along with it.) The photo definitely looks like sorbet and not ...


2

They're really thin, so it's a really small amount of food. I wouldn't feel at all guilty about pitching them, but if you do want to use them, that means the main way it'll really matter is if you use them for texture or appearance. But usually we do the opposite: remove the skins from nuts to make something with a smooth texture and uniform color. So I ...


1

You can use them in baking cookies, cupcakes,or you can even dry them, grind them and then add in yoghurt or condensed milk or ice cream. You can even use them to cleanse your skin by simply grinding and mixing with your daily face wash. Hope this helps...


1

I use frozen trimmings and bones for stock on a regular basis and haven't ever had any issues (and I can't see why you would). However, parts from food eaten by someone may have contamination issues unless they only removed the bones and/or skin with clean hands (which you could have done yourself before serving them). I don't follow many rules for my ...


1

I frequently make more rice than I need -- I store it because I love to cook fried rice and the best fried rice is made from leftover rice. Make sure that you let the rice cool before you put it in a container. I always store mine in ziplock bags. Adding a little water to it when you microwave it will help to reconstitute it. Otherwise, if you're going to ...


1

It seems that the secret to re-heating rice is to use a little bit of liquid during the re-heating process. StillTasty suggests adding 2 tbsp. of liquid per cup of cooked rice, and about 1 minute on high for each cup in a microwave (5 minutes flat for stovetop re-heating). Another thing it hints at, though doesn't outright state, is that cooked rice ...


1

My first reaction was to think that grapefruit seeds have cyanide, don't they? Nope, that's apples, apricots and peaches. I did find an application you might find interesting: Grapefruit Seed Extract Self-made pure GSE processed without solvents is prepared by grinding the grapefruit seed and juiceless pulp, then mixing with glycerin. A few sites ...


1

I can't really answer the question on what to do with the egg whites but the question how long the egg whites are good: two to four days. Hmm, what about macaroons?


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http://www.nevadoroses.com/roses/edible-roses/14-edible-roses/er001/P90-edible-roses.html I have not tried them yet, but this looks promising.


1

Yep, they are edible and I am eating them right now. They are roasted untill they turn black charcoal colored and then peeled. The kernel smells a bit like coffee bean. They are very hard to bite, so they must be kept in the mouth for some time mixing with saliva and eaten slowly. It helps people who have a habit of constant nibbling, so they can engage ...


1

We use leftover beet water in protein shake along with other veggies..too many nutrients to throw down the drain.


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You must make borscht. See for example here; you don't have to have meat in the recipe.


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With a little planning you can add it to most brownie mixes with great results. You might have to add an extra egg and some milk to the mixture and bake it a little longer, but that's a heck of a lot easier than trying to make something from scratch. I made some brownies with about two or three cups of crumbs, took them to work the next day and everybody ...



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