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8

I'm no authority, but I have a hypothesis. Measuring weight is more complex than measuring volume. Before the invention of the digital scale (recent history), or the spring scale (1770, by a Brit) things were weighed with a balance scale and a set of weights. Materials alone makes this more expensive than a simple cup that would hold a liquid. Given the ...


8

The Wikipedia answer to this is that Fannie Farmer in her 1896 very popular cookbook decided to use volume measurements for solids instead of weight measurements. In chapter 2 she explains how precise measurements are essential in following recipes and then goes on to explain how to measure flour by volume. No fanfare. My impression is that she was just ...


7

My guess is that the Belgians (like the French) rarely eat milk cold and uncooked in the way that the British do. The Belgians will have their milk in hot chocolate, or cakes etc, whereas the Brits will have it cold in cereal (again, in France at least, cereal is eaten with warm milk). I have found that the UHT milk in French supermarkets tastes a lot ...


7

The basic principle of serving a dish at a time is called Russian Service by the French, who started using it in the early 1800s. The particular order of the dishes has changed with the times and with theories of how meals should be served. The book Arranging the Meal by Flandrin describes the history of these changing fashions. There has been a debate ...


5

Don't really like to define one vegtable as better than another, but Asparagus has always had a reputation as a luxury item. A combination of the expense of producing it (You cannot get a high yield, plus it takes a number of years to develop a productive asparagus bed) and a relatively short season (At least in the UK) meant it would be a rare treat for ...


3

Asparagus is delicious! In North America it is certainly not the phenomenon that it is in parts of Europe, but its popularity is on the rise (I worked in a grocery store for many years....). We have only been getting the white variety (which is just the green variety grown with soil mounded over it so it is never exposed to sunlight) for the last few years. ...


2

I certainly don't know why asparagus is so beloved in Germany, but here in Croatia it's one of the less used vegetables so it's definitely not a global phenomenon. I suspect it has to do with culture and what grows best in certain cultures. To give another example, I guess that most people in Italy would call tomato a king of vegetables, if it were a ...


2

I've never heard of asparagus being "the king of vegetables". This article (and the articles that preceded it) may cast some light on why asparagus is not so commonly eaten. According to the article, "This allergy is well-known in Germany, especially when dealing with young asparagus shoots." Here is a quote from the first article in the series: "Now when ...


2

I think it's convenience topping taste. To be honest, I've got used to UHT now, and the convenience of never having to worry about milk going off (and not having to return to the shop every other day to buy more) is undeniable. (I'm actually surprised by the percentage for Switzerland on that Wikipedia page, I don't think I've ever been offered pasteurised ...


2

My guess would be the convenience of storage for markets. Less refrigerated space is going to cost less in electrical expense. Consumers can also stock up without having as much dedicated space in refrigerators. European refrigerators in particular tend to be on the small side.


2

Its pretty common in indian culture to eat sweets before eating savory stuff,


2

In certain cultures whole pieces of fruit, like an apple, for example, will be served for dessert and the diners are expected to eat it using fork and knife only - no fingers. as far as traditional desserts such as pies and cakes, I'm sure you must mean whether the individual serving requires a knife because, of course, a whole cake or pie must be cut into ...


2

From my experience, there are no major differences between Canadian and Northern American dishes. We have most of the normal Turkey (or Goose/Duck), yams, potatoes, stuffing/dressing, pies etc... There are probably more differences with in the United States itself (southern vs northern), for example the cornbread you mentioned. In other words, when I watch ...


1

Bratwurst is a sausage made up of Beef, Pork and Veal. There are significant differences in the flavors of meat around the world. Breeds of pork and beef especially have developed regional flavors based on breeding and feeding practices. For veal the young beef is still young enough and feeding practices standardized such that the veal portion of bratwurst ...


1

I'm sure it's down to how the meat is ground (if the issue is texture), and what spices are used (if the issue is flavor). It's less likely that the meat is totally different--though you never know. There are about as many variations on any given type of sausage as there are people that make them. Your best bet is to either keep trying to find a place ...


1

They are almost certainly pork rinds, what we call pork scratchings in the UK. They are a staple in old fashioned (usually crappy) pubs like the Winchester, usually hanging behind the bar on cardboard displays, alongside KP peanuts and Scampi Fries. In less enlightened days, where only one kind of woman would ever be found in a pub (at least on the ...


1

Eat My Brains has listed under trivia for the movie: Specially designed packets of 'Hog Lumps' were designed for the film by Edgar's brother, Oscar. I don't think they're real, although there have been some claims online that there is a real product out there that markets itself as 'Hog Lumps' : They're real. Mr Porky's Hog Lumps and they're ...



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