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42

There is considerable overlap between cupcakes and muffins. Method From a technical point of view, muffins are made by the muffin method, making them small quickbreads. In the muffin method, the wet ingredients are combined in one bowl; and the dry ingredients are combined in another bowl. Then the two are quickly incorporated together with minimal ...


13

Isn't that normal? I suppose if it's causing a problem, you could use a non-stick (teflon, etc.) muffin pan, without the paper liners. You could also try silicone-coated (parchment) liners. A quick check reveals that e.g., Amazon sells them. <purist>cornbread shall be cooked in preheated cast iron, and if that's sticking, you need to season your cast ...


10

I've not yet found a cake recipe which I could not use for cupcakes instead. I always change the baking time and only the baking time. I rotate the tray of cuppies after about 7 minutes, and after another 7 minutes or so I use the "clean toothpick" method to see when they are done. It does vary greatly, but from most cake recipes, I expect to get 18-24 ...


9

You are correct: Cupcakes are just regular sponge cakes cooked in approximately cup-sized tins.


8

I've had this happen too and I've found this little trick helps. Line your muffin/cupcake tin with your papers and then give the papers in the pan a light coating with non-stick spray.


7

Firstly, it strikes me as odd that your recipe has no raising agent - no baking powder, no bicarbonate/baking soda, no self-raising flour. Unless you're whipping a lot of air into the batter, the cakes will barely rise, and you will end up with 'cookies'. I would add 2 teaspoons of baking powder and 1/4 teaspoon of bicarbonate of soda (baking soda) and see ...


6

The short answer is no; there are no specific ingredients that don't scale (double or triple or quintuple, makes no real difference). There are, however, two pitfalls you need to be aware of when scaling any recipe: If your recipe uses volumetric measurements, especially very small ones for important ingredients (such as half a teaspoon of baking soda) ...


6

We used to make "display bread" using salt dough. Basically you add as much salt as flour (eg. 3 cups) to make it uninteresting for bacteria. To make the end result hard enough to last, you can add either hot water and a little oil or cold water and a spoon of wallpaper glue. Add as much water as necessary to form a bread like dough. Add anything (eg curry, ...


5

Bakeries often create fake cakes for display purposes that are non-edible structures decorated with royal icing and such that will last for long periods of time without going bad. I found this website with step-by-step instructions on making a fake cake: http://m.voices.yahoo.com/how-fake-cakes-display-564492.html


5

Quite often that look can be from having the temp too high on the oven. A convection oven should always be at least 25 (and some people will say up to 50) degrees cooler than a 'normal' oven. If you haven't tried it yet, knock down the temp of the oven. We used to call this 'lava tops', because basically the outside is baking and setting quickly, and then ...


5

For the cooking, reduce the time but keep the temperature the same as before. If the large tin took 30 mins, then the cupcake might just be 8 to 10 minutes. The other questions are too vague to answer. How many cupcakes will vary from recipe to recipe and some recipes require other changes to make them work. There's no single answer that can apply to ...


4

Other than issues with crowding issues (during cooking, in the mixing bowl, etc.), I can only think of one problem that I've specifically seen with baked goods, and it was directions to: add one egg at a time, beating for two minutes after each addition The person who made the cake followed the instructions exactly (rather than modify it to add double ...


4

If you put them upside down into the microwave under a wet paper towel for 15 seconds, the cupcake papers come right off.


4

Yes, it is bad. Most baking powder will begin to produce co2 as soon it gets wet. If you let the batter rest before putting it in the oven, your cake will thus lose some of airiness.


4

Yes and Maybe. You should definitely place the pan 'centered on the center rack' of a well pre-heated oven. The heat should be absorbed evenly and allow all of the cupcakes to bake at the same pace. (If your oven has 'hot spots' you may wish to rotate the pan once, 180°, about half way through the expected cooking time). As for how long to bake them, do ...


4

From personal experiences, reading cookbooks, and making far too many baked goods I've learned that it can be tricky to just adding extra ingredients while maintaining a universal base cake or cupcake recipe. However, with good judgment and some basic ingredients ratios you could come close to an archetype. Some ratios (by weight) of basic ingredients ...


4

The crusting is important so that any flowers or other intricate decorations will fix their shape and not slump when left out in warmer temperatures. (you don't want to refrigerate iced cakes, as when you remove them from the fridge, you'll get condensation). An icing that crusts quickly means that you can use an icing that's not quite as stiff for your ...


4

Due to thekitchn website the difference between muffins and cupcakes is the following: A muffin is something that's relatively healthy. It's not too sweet, perhaps made with whole wheat flour, and is more likely to be loaded with fruit than candy (ex: Blueberries). A muffin can also be savory instead of sweet. The texture is usually dryer and slightly ...


3

Yes, you should store them in a air-tight jar, and the best is to store the jar in a cool place in the house. The fridge is to moist for storing cupcakes. You can store them in the jar for about 3-4 days, but they won't taste fresh any more. So I would suggest if you want to store them longer then 1 or maybe 2 days, freeze them right after they cooled down ...


3

I immediately thought of this table, from the front of the muffin section in Bread, by Beth Hensperger*: Muffin size Baking time Yield Mini/gem (1 5/8") 10-15 minutes 18-20 Regular (2 3/4") 20-25 minutes 9-10 Oversized (3 1/4") 25-30 minutes 6-7 Muffin cake (8-9") 55-65 minutes 1 The baking times are for 375-400F; most ...


3

Depending on the size of the cupcake tin you may have to increase or decrease the cooking times and temperature. My favorite "brownie disguised as a cupcake" recipe is from Paula Deen - http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/paula-deen/peanut-butter-brownie-cupcakes-recipe/index.html


3

One question would be why do you need the wrappers? If you don't need them at all, just grease the pans and don't use them. I once agreed to make cupcakes for a wedding**, and as I knew this was a potential problem (and I didn't want people dressed nicely having to struggle with unwrapping frosted cupcakes), I greased the muffin tins, and purchased larger ...


3

Yes, a cupcake recipe is probably one of the few which can't just be tripled. All cupcake recipes I've come across are chemically leavened (they include baking powder or baking soda). With baking powder and baking soda, the leavening starts as soon as you mix the dry and the liquid parts of the batter - even before you put the batter into the oven. It ...


3

There are two main approaches to pairing: experience and (not always reliable, but sometimes surprising) chemical similarity. On the experience side, The Flavor Bible's listing for "oranges – in general" lists "mint" as a very highly recommended pairing (level 3 of 4). However, on the reverse it lists "orange" only as suggested by a few experts as a ...


2

I've made Angel Food mini cakes before. It was just a matter of adjusting the baking time. Using the standard "clean toothpick" method to ensure they were done worked fine for me.


2

I have just used the same mix and the same baking time, just using a mini muffin pan in place of a 9x9 or 9x13 pan. It worked quite well, although I suggest using the mini muffin liners in the pan, because cleaning all those individual spaces in the pan after brownie baking goes much smoother. I found that without the liners, the tiny brownies seemed to ...


2

I second the non-stick spray. Another suggestion would be putting a water bath in to keep the muffins or cupcakes from drying out too much and sticking to the paper.


2

If the size per cake is reduced then they will bake faster and also have a greater chance of becoming dryer. If they are the same size per cake simply more of them, then no they won't bake faster and will probably take a little longer to cook.


2

Yes, they will indeed cook faster, simply because the heat can penetrate through the cakes faster. Likewise, if you had 48 instead of 24, they would take even less time.


2

Many frostings incorporate more than butter as the fat in the icing. I recently made ones using shortening, coconut butter, and coconut milk solids. These three are all fats that have higher melting points and are more reliable at higher temperatures in comparison to butter. If you wish to retain as much of the butter mouthfeel as possible, you might ...



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