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7

Mortadella does need to be refrigerated. As for the proscuitto ... if it's real cured ham (and not the fake 'cured' stuff you get in the US) and was trimmed with a clean knife and wasn't otherwise contaminated when being cut, and it's not the middle of the summer where you are, it's likely fine being stored in a cool area of your kitchen. Mind you, the US ...


7

The website specifically says : All of our salame are cured and naturally aged. Other salumi items like our Mortadella are spiced and cooked in the Italian tradition. The problem is that there are two classifications of meat that only vary by a letter: Salami (the plural of salame) are cured, air-dried meats. They can be stored at room temperature ...


5

I have had some success with this recipe: http://awesomepickle.com/pickled-herring-recipe-how-to-fillet-a-fish/ The fish should keep for a couple of weeks once pickled, but I always tend to eat mine in the first few days.


5

I suspect that this is because in Europe, the pig has been a fairly common household animal. For example, in the past in Poland, all families that didn't live in closely packed towns would have their own pigs. Some of the reasons for keeping pigs is that they don't need much room and can eat almost anything - you can easily feed them household scraps, or ...


5

Curing is the process of using salt, sugar, nitrates, etc to preserve meat, generally by lowering the water activity below the point at which microorganisms can grow. Some cured meats are also fermented though, which complicates matters. Fermented sausages, such as salami are fermented with mold to add flavor and extend shelf life.


4

You should be fine scaling this recipe up, as long as you are sure to scale all components equally. The USDA regulations for commercial brining and curing give a maximum of 200ppm (parts per million) sodium nitrite in the finished product. They also stipulate a minimum of 120ppm ingoing nitrite for adequate preserving properties in refrigerated products. ...


4

Salting, fermenting and drying render these products safe. Always salting (including sodium nitrite, also known as pink salt) and always drying. This creates an inhospitable atmosphere for unsafe organisms. That would cover dried/cured meat products like prosciutto, pancetta or bacon. Most salumi are also fermented, which produces that pleasant, slightly ...


4

No, these are completely different products. As you indicate, so called "pink salt" is a mixture of sodium chloride (regular salt) and sodium nitrate (or sodium nitrite) for curing meats, tinted pink to distinguish it from regular table salt. it allows relatively accurate small batch curing, as in home sausage making. Himalayan pink salt is a naturally ...


4

So...you're both sort of correct, just depending on how you look at the question. Curing vs Fermentation First, let's have a quick science primer on food. All of the food humans consume and utilize for energy can be broadly categorized as differing ratios of protein(remember these are amino acid (AA) chains), carbohydrates(sugars and fiber are types of ...


4

Don't see why you can't make oaked meat. Corned beef and salt pork have been around for a long time. The 'corn' referred to isn't actually corn, but is rock salt. Here is a good starting point if you want to make oaked, corned beef which doesn't require refrigeration: http://science.howstuffworks.com/innovation/edible-innovations/food-preservation5.htm ...


3

According to Smoking Meat Forums, you would need 2 ounces of pink salt for 50 lbs of sausage, which is a ratio of 0.0025 pink salt to meat (they provide three significant digits) for short curing time sausages. These are sausages which will be cooked or smoked. Therefore, converting to metric, 50 kg, you would require 125 grams or so pink salt. Note ...


3

The salt in the cure inhibits bacterial growth (particularly if the salt is one made for curing, and contains nitrates). So you should be warned that you are trading a few blood pressure points for enhanced risk of foodborne illness. Unfortunately, I think your options are rather limited -- either to keep the salt as-is, or forgo jerky in your diet.


2

Liquid Smoke, you can use it as part of a rub or in a marinade or brine to infuse a rich smokey flavor to the meat as a pre-treatment. A Rub is most likely to get you the results you want. note: I have hopes that using oak chips in a brine would work as well, this is an a quick solution to your question.


2

From Wikipedia: Sodium nitrite, used as a curing agent, is what gives pepperoni the pink part of its distinct orange-pink color, while paprika or other capsicum provides the orange part. It cites a food science blog article as the source.


2

While the salt does inhibit bacterial growth, it is possible to safely make jerky in a dehydrator without it if you are careful about the temperature, moisture, and dehydrating time. There is more information on this thread.


2

You ned to get your hands on a computer fan (they are designed to run 24hrs a day). I simply mounted one of these inside wall of my curing chamber (down low - as wet air drops), cut a hole in the wall of the fridge with a hole saw - which allows the fan to exhaust the moist air from within the curing chamber. I also cut a similar sized hole at the top of ...


2

I have a vent in my curing chamber that's an old refrigerator converted over.I used a metal dryer vent and caulked the perimeter once installed, i also leave the metal flap open a bit with a magnet. This allows circulation of air inside of the chamber via the fan. I have a steady 58 degrees with 70% RH.


2

You give three examples here: ham, sausages, bacon and I'm sure there are plenty of others from pork. But you can get a similar range from beef or venison/game meat. I'm from South Africa and we have a traditional dish which is called boerewors which is sausage made from meat such as beef or game. We also have biltong which is a dried and cured meat also ...


2

As Jay mentioned, potassium nitrate or sodium nitrite is what gives commercially made corned beef its long-lasting pink color. Home cooks can use the same chemicals. Just make sure that whichever you buy is specifically labeled for use in food. Also, since you mentioned that the corned beef you buy comes with a spice mixture, check the ingredient list to ...


1

You could use the smoked salt, but it would not impart that much smoked flavor and would be quite expensive compared to normal kosher salt. Since most wet-cured bacon available at the grocery store is flavored with liquid smoke, an easy alternative would be to rub the belly with liquid smoke prior to roasting as described at The Splendid Table. As a side ...


1

Michael Ruhlman & Brian Polcyn have a recipe for Duck Prosciutto in their Charcuterie book. They suggested only using kosher salt and leave it completely surrounded with salt for 24 hours. Rinse thoroughly, pat dry completely, wrap in cheesecloth and tie and hang for a week in a cool humid place. Add a day or two if beast is squishy. It should be ...


1

Officially, you want 2% salt and 1/9th of that Pink salt. Although for fresh sausage you may find that a bit salty. 1% or 1.5% maybe taste better and be healthier. modern medicine is now onboard with cancer caused by Nitrites. If your meat is clean, from a good source and not from 100 different pigs, consider skipping the pink stuff. Salt IS indeed a ...


1

I don't know much about dry-curing in general, but dry-aging of beef, which is a similar process, has been studied in detail by Kenji at Serious Eats. Based on his findings, I would suggest you're running into a similar issue: So why does meat being aged stop losing moisture after the first few weeks? It's a matter of permeability. As meat loses ...


1

There are several variables that need to be considered to properly and safely dry cure meat...temperature, humidity, ph level, for example. Just on the topic of moisture loss, however...you will not be able to tell simply by looking. People who do this for a living can tell by touching...most of us weigh our product before hanging. In general, when there ...


1

Morton's Tender Quick is a fast cure salt meant to be mixed in with ground meats or used for curing thinner cuts (or fish). Hams must be brined for days in order for the salt solution to penetrate deeply through the flesh and prevent spoilage. It is important to follow good curing protocol and use the amount of salt as requested in the recipe. Sodium ...


1

This question is almost entirely a duplicate of this one on corned beef, sodium nitrite and Tender Quick.. Please see the answers for that question. The only thing not covered in that question are the proportions of salt, sodium nitrite and sodium nitrate in Tender Quick. You would need to calculate those ratios, and compare them with the ratios in pink ...


1

Too humid an environment will, as you are seeing, slow the curing process down. As long as they are still decreasing in weight you should be OK but you need to be careful of moisture forming on the outside of the casings as this may encourage nastier moulds to grow beyond the white one expected on salami. If they are not losing weight at all this is a ...



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