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23

What spices to buy? I have listed commonly used spices/ingredients. If you are on a budget, purchase the ones with a (!) before them. Powders and Pastes ("Masalas") (!) Coriander Powder ("Dhania Powder") (!) Cumin Powder ("Jeera Powder") (!) Red Chilli Powder ("Laal Mirch Powder") Turmeric Powder ("Haldi Powder") Garam Masala Powder Ginger Garlic Paste ...


21

Garam masala is a catch-all term for an Indian spice blend. It has no fixed recipe but is likely to contain a combination of cloves, cardamom, cinnamon, bay, black pepper, star anise, dried chillies, coriander, cumin and maybe more or less. Blends vary according to family tradition and region. Spices are then dried out and possibly roasted, before being ...


17

Yogurt is a mesh of denatured milk protein that traps the whey. When yogurt is over-heated those proteins tighten and squeeze out the extra whey. When the protein matrix is cut it will also leak whey. To combat this add a little starch. A little cornstarch mixed into the yogurt will prevent the yogurt proteins from over-coagulating. All heated yogurt ...


17

Yogurt curdles at high temperatures. If you curdle a big lump of yogurt, breaking it up well is hard, and it doesn't taste too well. You want to end up with tiny particles evenly dispersed in the dish. So when you add it a spoon at a time, you can mix it really well before it has had time to curdle. An alternative method is to do it the other way round. ...


15

No. Sweetened condensed milk has a 40% sugar content. It is very sweet, suitable for desserts and such. It is entirely too sweet to substituted into a curry. The consistency is drastically different. Evaporated milk is about the same consistency as heavy cream. Sweetened condensed milk, because of its high sugar content, is more the consistency of a warm ...


13

1 - Oil is separated in curries normally after you have cooked spices or sauces for ~10-15 mins. You can tell by seeing "bubbles" appearing and the oil by making a thin layer on top of your sauces/curry. 2 - It varies, but normally after 10-15 mins the oil separates from your curry. 3 - Normally after cooking for 10-15 mins most of the water dries up which ...


13

Even though it isn't really milk (in the dairy sense), coconut milk still naturally separates into a thick cream and thinner liquid like regular milk. As such, when working with coconut milk you should still follow the same procedures you would to make a milk-based cream sauce. The number one rule when making any creamy sauce is: DON'T LET IT BOIL! Boiling ...


13

Half and half or heavy cream is a pretty good substitute. It has similar fat/water suspension, reduces and thickens similarly, and emulsifies similarly. You lose the coconut flavor, but it cooks similarly and you keep the texture. You cannot substitute coconut cream, because it is too rich, which changes the texture of the sauce greatly, and doesn't do ...


13

I like to add unground spices (cumin seeds, mustard seeds, fennel, star anise etc. and of course garlic and chili depending what curry I am making) at the beginning, gives a better flavour to the oil. Then I would add meat and/or veggies, stir fry them a little bit, and finally add the ground spices and water. Water will dissolve the spices and will make it ...


12

You are trying to add the yoghurt at too high a temperature. Let the dish cool to around 75 deg C before adding the yoghurt, and make adding the yoghurt the last thing you do before serving.


12

I think for Indian recipes you should in general look for an unstrained, set yoghurt. There are other factors that determine the final taste and texture of the yoghurt (the bacteria, the type of milk, length of fermentation, …) but you may not have much choice w.r.t. other factors than these two: Production process: Set yoghurt is yoghurt that's made the ...


11

If the English curry is similar to this, you are missing CREAM!


11

When you open a can of coconut milk, it usually has separated, with the thick stuff at the top, and more watery business at the bottom. Don't shake or stir it! Start your curry with just the thick stuff, and then thin it as needed with the remainder. I would definitely not add a starch-based thickener. That isn't traditional in Thai curries and will ...


11

I own the same book and was similarly surprised when I read that instruction, but in the section on ingredients, the author does mention a particular variety of onions called pink onions. The mention is on pg. 32, and there is a picture of a pink onion on the upper left of pg. 34. Here's an excerpt from pg. 32: "The longer the onions are fried, the ...


11

It sounds like you're assuming that recipes are scientific creations carefully engineered to achieve a precise result. But most "recipes" are an attempt to relay a rather imprecise series of steps based on available ingredients, familiarity, superstition, and habit in a way that is approximately reproducible by someone else. Even within the bounds of ...


10

Turmeric is an intense stain. I would use a little bit of bleach, let it sit until the stain disappears, then wash the mortar very thoroughly. Another option is just to accept that the mortar may develop colors over time, and think of it as character.


10

In addition to reducing the temperature of the curry, you can also: Temper the yoghurt - combine a small amount of the warm sauce to the yoghurt before adding it to the curry. This helps when adding cream, milk, or eggs to a sauce. Whisk the yoghurt - use a fork or whisk and vigorously mix the yoghurt. As the fats and proteins are emulsified in the ...


10

There is nothing inauthentic about using sugar in an Indian dish, even a savory one. For example, Gujarati cooks often add raw sugar (jaggery) to daal and curries. Quoth Wikipedia: "It is common to add a little sugar or jaggery to some of the sabzi/shaak and daal. The sweet flavour of these dishes is believed to neutralize the slightly salty taste of the ...


10

Allow it to cool, then put it in the fridge for a few hours. The fat should rise to the top and harden, making it easier to scoop away. If you can't wait for it to cool, either skim the oil off with a spoon or use some kitchen paper to soak it up.


9

Use double or triple that volume of spices, and gentle dry roast them first Use ghee (clarified butter) instead of oil Use loads of cream to finish the gravy


9

First, start your Thai coconut curry sauce in a separate pot (i.e. the coconut milk and later the seasonings; no meat , no vegetables, etc.). Make sure to shake the can of coconut milk before opening to ensure it is not separated. Add 1/2 the can to the pot. Bring to boil, reduce temperature and allow the mixture to reduce to almost a paste like texture. ...


9

In most Indian restaurants, one only sees the gravy based curries. This is just one side of Indian cooking. For dry curries, the technique is totally different. For most dry curries, you temper whole spices in hot oil (traditionally sunflower, mustard, canola or groundnut oil). After tempering, the vegetables are added (usually one one kind at a time in a ...


8

As ever, it depends on the exact recipe. It seems to me that garlic is conspicuously missing from your list of ingredients, though. Additionally, you could try very small amount (1/4 teaspoon for a medium put to start) of the following spices: Cloves Turmeric Cinnamon Cardamom (this really sorted out a dish I was making yesterday that was tasting a little ...


8

There are two traditional way to eat curry. Indians typically eat their curry with a type of bread. Usually Naan or Roti and use piece of the bread as a scoop/spoon of sort. Thai curry will tend to be eaten, as you suggested, over top of rice. Typically it is separated when it is served so the rice does not get soggy while it is waiting to be served. The ...


8

I suppose the Belgian "curry ketchup" is similar to the German varieties and no, they are usually not only seasoned with curry powder, but also other spices. There is no standard seasoning mix for curry ketchup, but common additional spices are ginger, black pepper, paprika, cayenne or other chili powders. I also think that some brands contain onions. The ...


8

I've seen and lived curries all my life. So, here it goes: Olive oil is something I won't use for curries. It has a very sweet flavour to it. Unlike suggestions from everyone else to use ghee, I would personally recommend you to use canola or sunflower oil but definitely more than half a teaspoon even if it is non-stick pan. Even though Ghee adds a lot of ...


8

You should definitely have a go at it, but I am afraid your time and effort would be better spent on finding a quality source of pre-made paste. This applies to most Asian cooking pastes and sauces. In most non-Asian countries you cannot get the fresh ingredients required to make them. If they are available, they generally are not the same variety and ...


8

It's down to oxidation reactions that are remarkably similar to those that cause meat and fats to go rancid. From Modernist Cuisine (2-98): ...[B]raised and pot roasted meats often develop a richer, more complex flavour if they have been cooled and aged after cooking, then later reheated for service. Surprisingly, the oxidation reactions that cause this ...


7

Yes, you will need to buy a pre-made curry paste if you want to get anywhere near 5 ingredients. Mae Ploy is a reputable brand.


7

Being a Thai, it's always confusing when I hear the term "red curry" because I am not sure exactly what kind of curry are being referred to. Red curry (Kaeng Ped or literally "spicy soup/curry") is a very general term and includes most spicy curry-based soups without specific names. The most common form of red curry in Bangkok restaurants is one with roasted ...



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